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The Bishop of Dover is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Canterbury, England.[1] The title takes its name after the town of Dover in Kent. Unlike the other three suffragans in the diocese, he holds the additional title of "Bishop in Canterbury" and is empowered to act almost as if he were the diocesan bishop of Canterbury, since the actual diocesan bishop (the Archbishop of Canterbury) is so frequently away fulfilling national and international duties. Among other things, this gives the Bishop of Dover an ex officio seat in the Church's General Synod.

The current Bishop of Dover is the Right Reverend Dr Stephen Venner, who is retiring in November 2009.

List of the Bishops of Dover

No. Incumbent From Until Notes
1 Richard Yngworth 1536 1545 Consecrated 9 December 1536; died in 1545.[2]
2 Richard Thornden 1545 1557 Consecrated in 1545; died in 1557.[2]
no appointment 1557 1569
3 Richard Rogers 1569 1597 Consecrated 15 May 1569; died 19 May 1597.[2]
in abeyance 1597 1870
4 Edward Parry 1870 1890
5 George Rodney Eden 1890 1897 Translated to Wakefield
6 William Walsh 1898 1916
7 Harold Ernest Bilbrough 1916 1927 Translated to Newcastle
8 John Victor Macmillan 1927 1934 Translated to Guildford
9 Alfred Carey Wollaston Rose 1935 1957
10 Lewis Evan Meredith 1957 1964
11 Anthony Paul Tremlett 1964 1980
12 Richard Henry McPhail Third 1980 1992 Formerly Bishop of Maidstone
13 John Richard Allan Llewellin 1992 1999 Formerly Bishop of St Germans
14 Stephen Squires Venner 1999 2009 (b.1944). Formerly Bishop of Middleton
15 Trevor Willmott 2009 present (b.1951). Formerly Bishop of Basingstoke

References

  1. ^ Crockford's Clerical Directory 2008/2009 (100th edition), Church House Publishing (ISBN 978-0-7151-1030-0).
  2. ^ a b c Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (Third Edition, revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 287. ISBN 0-521-56350-X.  

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File:Canterbury cathedral.jpg Anglicanism portal

The Bishop of Dover is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Canterbury, England.[1] The title takes its name after the town of Dover in Kent. Unlike the other suffragan in the diocese, the Bishop of Maidstone, the Bishop of Dover holds the additional title of "Bishop in Canterbury" and is empowered to act almost as if he were the diocesan bishop of Canterbury, since the actual diocesan bishop (the Archbishop of Canterbury) is based at Lambeth Palace in London, and thus is so frequently away from his diocese fulfilling national and international duties. Among other things, this gives the Bishop of Dover an ex officio seat in the Church's General Synod.

The current Bishop of Dover, since February 2010, is the Right Reverend Trevor Willmott.

List of the Bishops of Dover

No. Incumbent From Until Notes
1 Richard Yngworth 1536 1545 Consecrated 9 December 1536; died in 1545.[2]
2 Richard Thornden 1545 1557 Consecrated in 1545; died in 1557.[2]
no appointment 1557 1569
3 Richard Rogers 1569 1597 Consecrated 15 May 1569; died 19 May 1597.[2]
in abeyance 1597 1870
4 Edward Parry 1870 1890
5 George Rodney Eden 1890 1897 Translated to Wakefield
6 William Walsh 1898 1916
7 Harold Ernest Bilbrough 1916 1927 Translated to Newcastle
8 John Victor Macmillan 1927 1934 Translated to Guildford
9 Alfred Carey Wollaston Rose 1935 1957
10 Lewis Evan Meredith 1957 1964
11 Anthony Paul Tremlett 1964 1980
12 Richard Henry McPhail Third 1980 1992 Formerly Bishop of Maidstone
13 John Richard Allan Llewellin 1992 1999 Formerly Bishop of St Germans
14 Stephen Squires Venner 1999 2009 (b.1944). Formerly Bishop of Middleton
15 Trevor Willmott 2010 present (b.1951). Formerly Bishop of Basingstoke

References

  1. ^ Crockford's Clerical Directory 2008/2009 (100th edition), Church House Publishing (ISBN 978-0-7151-1030-0).
  2. ^ a b c Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (Third Edition, revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 287. ISBN 0-521-56350-X. 

External links



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