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Butylone
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-(methylamino)butan-1-one
Identifiers
CAS number 17762-90-2
ATC code  ?
PubChem  ?
ChemSpider 21073070
Chemical data
Formula C 12H15NO3  
Mol. mass 221.2524 g/mol
SMILES eMolecules & PubChem
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability  ?
Metabolism  ?
Half life  ?
Excretion  ?
Therapeutic considerations
Pregnancy cat.  ?
Legal status
Routes  ?

Butylone, also known as β-keto-N-methyl-3,4-benzodioxolylbutanamine (bk-MBDB), is a psychoactive drug and research chemical of the phenethylamine chemical class that acts as an entactogen, psychedelic, and stimulant. It is the β-keto analogue of methylbenzodioxylbutanamine (MBDB).

Butylone was first synthesized by Koeppe, Ludwig and Zeile which is mentioned in their 1967 paper.[1] It remained an obscure product of academia until 2005 when it was synthesized by a chemical supply company, and has since continued to be sold as a designer drug.[2] It has since been explored as a possible entheogen. Butylone shares the same relationship to MBDB as methylone does to methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "Ecstasy"). The dosage range is not fully understood but seems to be lower than for MBDB. Formal research on this chemical was first conducted in 2009, when it was shown to be metabolised in a similar manner to related drugs like methylone.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Koeppe, Ludwig and Zeile. US Patent No. 3478050.  
  2. ^ Uchiyama N, Kikura-Hanajiri R, Kawahara N, Goda Y. Analysis of designer drugs detected in the products purchased in fiscal year 2006. (Japanese). Yakugaku Zasshi. 2008 Oct;128(10):1499-505. PMID 18827471
  3. ^ Zaitsu K, Katagi M, Kamata HT, Kamata T, Shima N, Miki A, Tsuchihashi H, Mori Y (July 2009). "Determination of the metabolites of the new designer drugs bk-MBDB and bk-MDEA in human urine". Forensic Science International 188 (1-3): 131–9. doi:10.1016/j.forsciint.2009.04.001. PMID 19406592.  

External links


Bk-MBDB
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-(methylamino)butan-1-one
Identifiers
CAS number 17762-90-2
ATC code  ?
PubChem  ?
Chemical data
Formula C12H15NO3 
Mol. mass 221.2524 g/mol
SMILES eMolecules & PubChem
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability  ?
Metabolism  ?
Half life  ?
Excretion  ?
Therapeutic considerations
Pregnancy cat.

?

Legal status
Routes  ?

Butylone (beta-ketone-3,4-methylenedioxy-alpha-ethyl-N-methylphenethylamine, bk-MBDB) is a psychedelic, stimulant, and empathogen-entactogen of the phenethylamine and cathinone chemical classes. It is the beta-ketone analogue of MBDB.

Butylone was first synthesized by Koeppe, Ludwig and Zeile which is mentioned in their 1967 paper. It remained an obscure product of academia until 2005 when it was synthesized by a chemical supply company, and has since continued to be sold as a designer drug.[1] It has since been explored as a possible entheogen. The chemical shares the same relationship to MBDB as methylone does to MDMA. The dosage range is not fully understood but seems to be lower than for MBDB. No formal research has been done on this chemical, and nothing is known of its pharmacological profile or toxicology, although anecdotal reports indicate it is subjectively similar to but milder than methylone.

When it first was available, the alternate names "butylone" and "mebylone" were proposed. These were abandoned because Butylone was found to be a trademarked name for pentobarbital, and the name "mebylone" was phonetically too easy to confuse with methylone and did not really reflect the chemical's structure.

See also

External links

References

  1. Uchiyama N, Kikura-Hanajiri R, Kawahara N, Goda Y. Analysis of designer drugs detected in the products purchased in fiscal year 2006. (Japanese). Yakugaku Zasshi. 2008 Oct;128(10):1499-505. PMID 18827471







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