The Full Wiki

Blackboard Jungle: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Blackboard Jungle

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Richard Brooks
Produced by Pandro S. Berman
Written by Richard Brooks,
based on the novel by Evan Hunter
Starring Glenn Ford
Anne Francis
Louis Calhern
Sidney Poitier
Music by Max C. Freedman, Jimmy DeKnight (song "Rock Around the Clock") (uncredited), Willis Holman (song “Blackboard Jungle”), Jenny Lou Carson (song "Let Me Go, Lover!" (uncredited)
Cinematography Russell Harlan, ASC
Editing by Ferris Webster
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date(s) March 19, 1955 (U.S. release)
Running time 101 min.
Country United States
Language English

Blackboard Jungle is a 1955 social commentary film about teachers in an inner-city school. It is based on the novel of the same name by Evan Hunter.

Contents

Synopsis

Richard Dadier (Glenn Ford) is a teacher at North Manual High School, an inner-city school where many of the pupils, led by student Gregory Miller (Sidney Poitier), frequently engage in anti-social behavior. Dadier makes various attempts to engage the students' interest in education, challenging both the school staff and the pupils. He is subjected to violence as well as duplicitous schemes; he first suspects Miller, but later realizes that Artie West (Vic Morrow) is the perpetrator, and challenges him in a classroom showdown.

Cultural impact

Advertisements

Music and teen culture

The film has also been credited with sparking the rock and roll revolution by featuring Bill Haley & His Comets' "Rock Around the Clock", initially a B-side, over the film's opening credits, as well as in the first scene, in an instrumental version in the middle of the film, and at the close of the movie, establishing that song as an instant classic. Popularized by its use in the film, "Rock Around the Clock" reached number one on the Billboard charts, and remained there for eight weeks. The music also led to a huge teenage audience for the film, and their exuberant response to it sometimes overflowed into violence and vandalism at screenings.[1] In this sense, the film has been seen as marking the start of a period of visible teenage rebellion in the late 20th century.

The film marked a watershed in the United Kingdom. When shown at a South London Cinema in Elephant and Castle in 1956 the teenage teddy boy audience began to riot, tearing up seats and dancing in the aisles.[2] After that, riots took place around the country wherever the film was shown.[3]

In March 2005, the 50th anniversary of the release of the film and the subsequent upsurge in popularity of rock and roll, was marked by a series of "Rock Is Fifty" celebrations in Los Angeles and New York City, involving the surviving members of the original Bill Haley & His Comets. The film was released on DVD in North America on May 10, 2005.

Genre

Blackboard Jungle was the first of what would become a popular genre: the film in which an idealistic teacher is confronted with a class of cynical teenagers, who have disengaged from conventional schooling. As so often in later films, issues of race and class lie at the heart of the dynamics. Subsequent films that exploited the theme include:

Cast

The three cast members who received highest billing in the original release were:

Other cast members include:

This was the debut movie for Morrow and Farah, and one of Poitier's earliest. Farah later changed his name to Jamie Farr.

Blackboard Jungle was Rafael Campos' debut film. He was prolific in movies and tv for 4 decades. His last film, Fever Pitch was also directed by Richard Brooks in 1985.

Awards

Honors

In 2010, Turner Classic Movies (TCM) listed the soundtrack of the movie on its list of the Top 15 Most Influential Movie Soundtracks of all time. TCM described the impact and the influence of the movie:

"MGM brought Hollywood into the rock 'n'roll era with BLACKBOARD JUNGLE. In search of the kind of music teens like the film's potential delinquents were listening to, director Richard Brooks borrowed a few records from star Glenn Ford's son Peter. When he heard Bill Haley and his Comets perform 'Rock Around the Clock,' he found the perfect theme song -- the first rock song ever used in a Hollywood feature. Teens flocked to the film, dancing in theatre aisles as the song played over the opening credits. Parents may have been shocked by such uninhibited behavior, but things got worse when screenings also inspired violence and vandalism around the world. Thanks to BLACKBOARD JUNGLE, the song hit number one on the Billboard charts, eventually selling 25 million copies and becoming what Dick Clark called 'The National Anthem of Rock’n’ Roll.'"

References

Rock Around the Clock and Me by Peter Ford

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message