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Blanchard, Oklahoma
—  City  —
Main Street in Blanchard
Location of Blanchard, Oklahoma
Coordinates: 35°8′56″N 97°39′2″W / 35.14889°N 97.65056°W / 35.14889; -97.65056Coordinates: 35°8′56″N 97°39′2″W / 35.14889°N 97.65056°W / 35.14889; -97.65056
Country United States
State Oklahoma
Counties McClain, Grady
Area
 - Total 11.1 sq mi (28.8 km2)
 - Land 11.1 sq mi (28.8 km2)
 - Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 1,270 ft (387 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 2,816
 Density 253.2/sq mi (97.8/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 73010
Area code(s) 405
FIPS code 40-06700[1]
GNIS feature ID 1090249[2]

Blanchard is a city in Grady and McClain counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The population was 2,816 at the 2000 census.

Contents

Geography

Blanchard is located at 35°8′56″N 97°39′2″W / 35.14889°N 97.65056°W / 35.14889; -97.65056 (35.148830, -97.650677)[3] at the intersection of Oklahoma State Highways 76 and 62.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 11.1 square miles (20.8 km²), all land.

Blanchard is considered to be \ of a rapidly growing area of northern McClain and Grady Counties known as the "Tri-City Area" with Newcastle and Tuttle.

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 2816 people. The population density was .5 people per square mile (97.8/km²). There were 11 housing units at an average density of 105.8/sq mi (40.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 91.62% White, 0.32% African American, 3.23% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.53% from other races, and 4.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.41% of the population.

There were 1,085 households which 36.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.0% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.6% were non-families. 22.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.5% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 13.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 4 years. For every 100 females there were 91.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,121, and the median income for a family was $43,028. Males had a median income of $31,691 versus $23,182 for females. The per capita income for the city was $2.00 About 7.8% of families and 10.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.5% of those under age 18 and 11.6% of those age 65 or over.

History

Blanchard is situated in Township 8 North, Range 4 West, Section 30 in northwestern McClain County. The town is served by U.S. Highway 62 and State Highway 76. Named after William G. "Bill" Blanchard, the community was organized originally by the Canadian Valley Construction Company, which also planned to build a railroad. However, the company went into bankruptcy, and the railroad came under the control of the Oklahoma Central Railroad which also experienced financial problems. The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway took over and completed the line.

The townsite was established by three lot sales beginning with the Canadian Valley Construction Company sale on September 19, 1906. The second sale was held on July 18, 1907, and final lots were sold on March 25, 1908, by the Blanchard Townsite Company. Within a year the town was described as having forty business establishments, including a state and national bank, four blacksmith shops, three livery barns, two grain elevators, and a weekly newspaper.

Several incorporation dates are reported in various publications pertaining to the history of Blanchard, and in the town offices as well. The most reliable source seems to be the Blanchard Record of October 25, 1907, which reported, "That Blanchard is now an incorporated town is realized by but a few of our citizens. The petition praying for incorporation was favorably acted upon at the [federal] courts at Chickasha [sic] last week. On or about November 19 notice of an election of officers will be given. In the meantime candidates will be chosen."

A population of 629 was reported by 1910, and 2,116 in 1996. The Blanchard post office charter was granted by the Post Office Department on December 19, 1906. Mail had previously been received at Womack. When Arthur H. "Art" and Bill Blanchard moved their store from Womack to the new townsite in 1906, they took the post office with them.

In 1909, the Northern District Court was established whereby McClain County was divided into two sections for legal matters for the convenience of the citizens. A court house was built in Blanchard, and the first case began on December 13, 1909. The district was disestablished in the late 1920s and combined with District One in Purcell, the county seat. At the turn of the twenty-first century Legal records could be found at Blanchard.

Blanchard today

Blanchard consists of a one square mile "core" of streets roughly laid out in a grid pattern situated atop a gentle hill surrounded by newer development and agricultural areas within about a four mile (6 km) radius of the center. Central Blanchard consists of homes (about half built before 1960), several churches and a historic Main Street downtown area. The commercial downtown features antique shops, eating establishments, city services, senior center and a fitness center.

On the periphery of the city center are schools, businesses and modern housing subdivisions. These subdivisions tend to be low-density (typically one to 5-acre (20,000 m2) lots.)

While Blanchard is often described as a commuter town with much of its workforce commuting to nearby Norman and Oklahoma City, local businesses are beginning to surge. As of 2008, local amenities include a supermarket, several restaurants, public library, banks, a large building supply center, new hardware store and a large car dealership.

Schools

Blanchard is served by four secondary schools with an average enrollment (as of 2008) of about 1,460 students. The elementary school is of recent construction and houses grades Pre-K through third. There is also an intermediate school for fourth and fifth grades and a middle school for sixth through eighth grades.

Blanchard High School is home to "The Lions" football team (class 3A.) The athletic program also includes baseball, softball, basketball, golf , cheerleading, powerlifting and wrestling. Most notable, though, is the Blanchard High School Marching Band which routinely wins top honors at state competitions.

Recreation

There are currently two parks in Blanchard as well as an athletic stadium and three nearby golf courses.

Annual festivals include "May Daze" in early May and "Pepperfest" in mid-June.

Growth issues

Residents of Blanchard tend to view it as a small town environment with character and charm, however, the rapid growth in the area has brought change. In an effort to keep the town from being swallowed by urban sprawl, a large annexation was effected in 2004 to provide Blanchard with a "buffer zone". A Main Street beautification project is underway and infrastructure is being improved to handle the rise in population. In 2007, several older buildings in central Blanchard were removed to allow the widening of U.S. Highway 62, yet the historic downtown commercial buildings were preserved.

Media

Residents of Blanchard and nearby Dibble, Oklahoma are served by the weekly newspaper The Blanchard News. The radio station KOJK ("Jack FM") identifies Blanchard as its home, however, only the transmitter is located in Blanchard, while the operating offices are in Oklahoma City.

References

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2005-05-03. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links


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