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Blount County, Tennessee
Map of Tennessee highlighting Blount County
Location in the state of Tennessee
Map of the U.S. highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location in the U.S.
Seat Maryville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

567 sq mi (1,469 km²)
559 sq mi (1,448 km²)
8 sq mi (21 km²), 1.43%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

105,823
189/sq mi (73/km²)
Founded 1795
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Blount-county-tennessee-courthouse1.jpg
Blount County Courthouse in Maryville
Website www.blounttn.org

Blount County is a U.S. county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. Its population was 105,823 at the United States Census, 2000. The 2006 Census Estimate placed the population at 118,186[1]. The county seat is at Maryville[2], which is also the county's largest city.

It is included in the Knoxville, Tennessee, Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

History

What is today Blount County was for many thousands of years Indian territory, passed down to the Cherokee tribe that claimed the land upon the arrival of white settlers in the late 18th century. Shortly thereafter, On July 11, 1795, Blount County became the tenth county established in Tennessee, when the Territorial Legislature voted to split adjacent Knox and Jefferson counties. The new county was named for the governor of the state of Tennessee, William Blount, and its county seat, Maryville, was named for his wife Mary Grainger Blount. This establishment, however, did little to settle the differences between white immigrants and Cherokee natives, which was, for the most part, not accomplished until an 1819 treaty[3].

Throughout its history the boundaries of Blount County have been altered numerous times, most notably in 1870 when a large swath of western Blount was split into Loudon and portions of other counties. Also, the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in 1936, while not affecting the territory of Blount County, has significantly impacted the use of southeastern Blount County [4].

Economy

Most of the early settlers were of very little means, existing on subsistence-based agriculture throughout the early years of the county's establishment. The first industry to make its mark on Blount County, as in other neighboring counties, was that of lumber. It was the massive development of this industry in the mountains of east Blount that, in part, led to the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which includes the southeastern portion of the county. Today manufacturing has replaced lumber in importance, with over 100 manufacturing plants located in the county[3].

Denso Manufacturing Tennessee Inc., a division of Denso Global, is the county's largest employer, with about 3,000 employees[5][6].

Government

The following list consists of the current elected members of the Blount County government[7]:

  • Commissioners: David Ballard, Tonya Burchfield, Gary Farmer, Ronald French, David Graham, Steve Hargis, Brad Harrison, Mark Hasty, Scott Helton, John Keeble, Gerald Kirby, Holden Lail, Mike Lewis, Joe McCulley, Kenneth Melton, Monika Murrell, Bob Profitt, Robert Ramsey, Wendy Pitts Reeves, Steve Samples, and Mike Walker
County government: Blount County
County Executive: Jerry Cunningham
Assessor of Property: Mike Morton
Clerk and Master: James Carroll
County Clerk: Roy Crawford Jr
Clerk of Courts: Thomas Hatcher
County Treasurer: {{{cty_treasurer}}}
District Attorney: Mike Flynn
Registrar of Deeds: Penny Whaley
Chief Highway Officer: Bill Dunlap
Registrar of Probate: {{{probate}}}
County Sheriff: James Berrong
Trustee: Scott Graves
State government
State Representative(s): 2 Representatives:Joe McCord (R-Tennessee District 8), Douglas Overbey (R-Tennessee District 20)
State Senator(s): 1 Senators:Raymond Finney (R-Tennessee District 8)
Federal government
U.S. Representative(s): John Duncan (R-2nd District)
U.S. Senators: Lamar Alexander (R)
Bob Corker (R)


The office of Constable was abolished in the 1990s.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 567 square miles (1,468 km²), of which, 559 square miles (1,447 km²) is land and 8 square miles (21 km²) (1.43%) is water.

The foothills of the Appalachian Mountains determine much of Blount County's landscape, with a segment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park extending into southeastern Blount County. In addition to the dominant mountains, the Little Tennessee River flows through the county and forms several man-made lakes created by the Tennessee Valley Authority.

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Adjacent counties

Geographical features

National protected area

Demographics

Age pyramid Blount County[8]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 105,823 people, 42,667 households, and 30,634 families residing in the county. The population density was 190 people per square mile (73/km²). There were 47,059 housing units at an average density of 84 per square mile (33/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 94.73% White, 2.91% Black or African American, 0.29% Native American, 0.72% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.34% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. 1.06% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 42,667 households out of which 30.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.40% were married couples living together, 10.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.20% are classified as non-families by the United States Census Bureau. Of the 42,667 households, 1,384 are unmarried partner households: 1,147 heterosexual, 107 same-sex male, 130 same-sex female. 24.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.80% under the age of 18, 8.30% from 18 to 24, 29.40% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 14.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,862, and the median income for a family was $45,038. Males had a median income of $31,877 versus $23,007 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,416. About 7.30% of families and 9.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.30% of those under age 18 and 9.10% of those age 65 or over.

Infrastructure

Parks

In addition to the federally operated Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which draws many visitors to the county each year, Blount County operates numerous smaller community parks and recreation centers, primarily in the cities of Alcoa and Maryville. Some of these facilities include[10]:

  • Amerine Park (Maryville)
  • Bassell Courts (Alcoa)
  • Bicentennial Park (Greenbelt)(Maryville)
  • Eagleton Park (Maryville)
  • Everett Athletic Complex (Maryville)
  • Everett Park/Everett Senior Center (Maryville)
  • Howe Street Park (Alcoa)
  • John Sevier Park/Pool (Maryville)
  • Louisville Point Park (Louisville)
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Center (Alcoa)
  • Oldfield Mini Park (Alcoa)
  • Pearson Springs Park (Maryville)
  • Pole Climbers Athletic Fields (Alcoa)
  • Richard Williams Park (Alcoa)
  • Rock Garden Park (Alcoa)
  • Sandy Springs Park (Maryville)
  • Springbrook Park/Pool (Alcoa)

Schools, Colleges and Universities

See Blount County Schools for a full list of public schools in the county system. The cities of Maryville and Alcoa operate separate, independent school systems. Private schools located in the county include: Maryville Christian School [11][12]; Montessori Middle School (opening in 2009[13]); and New Horizon Montessori School.

Blount County is home to two post-secondary educational institutions: Maryville College, in downtown Maryville, and a satellite campus of Knoxville-based Pellissippi State Technical Community College, referred to as Pellissippi State Technical Community College, Blount County Campus.

Transportation

Paratransit

Blount County is served by the East Tennessee Human Resource Agency's Public Transit system. ETHRA, as it is commonly referred to, operates over sixteen counties in eastern Tennessee, and is headquartered in the nearby city of Loudon. The service offers residents of any of the counties covered by ETHRA door-to-door pickup transportation across its service area by request only[14].

Airports

TYS, McGhee Tyson Airport

Highways

  • State highways
    • TN State Primary Route 33 Old Knoxville Hwy, Broadway & Hwy 411 South
    • TN State Primary Route 35 Sevierville Road, Washington Street & North Hall Road
    • TN State Primary Route 72 Calderwood Hwy
    • TN State Primary Route 73 Lamar Alexander Pkwy & Wears Valley Road
    • TN State Primary Route 115 Airport Hwy/Alcoa Hwy, Hwy 411 South & Calderwood Hwy
    • TN State Primary Route 162 Pellissippi Pkwy
  • Secondary Routes
    • TN Secondary Route 333 Topside Road, Louisville Road, Quarry Rd & Miser Station Road
    • TN Secondary Route 334 Louisville Road
    • TN Secondary Route 335 William Blount Drive, Hunt Road & Old Glory Road
    • TN Secondary Route 336 Montvale Road, Six Mile Road, Brick Mill Road
    • TN Secondary Route 337 Wears Valley Road
    • TN Secondary Route 429 Airbase Road
    • TN Secondary Route 446
    • TN Secondary Route 447

Cities and unincorporated communities

Map of Blount County, Tennessee showing cities, CDPs, and Census county divisions.

Cities

Unincorporated

  • Alnwick
  • Binfield
  • Clover Hill
  • Cold Springs
  • Dry Valley
  • Eagleton Village (CDP)
  • Happy Valley
  • Kinzel Springs
  • Laws Chapel
  • Melrose
  • Mentor
  • Mint
  • Seymour (CDP; partially in Sevier County)
  • Six Mile
  • Sunshine
  • Walland
  • Wildwood

References

  1. ^ U.S. Census Bureau data
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/usamap.cfm. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  
  3. ^ a b About Blount County Blount County official website
  4. ^ Lansford, D., and D. Waterworth. "Blount County History," TNGenWeb Project
  5. ^ "DENSO Plant 203 is a key marker in 20-year history," The Maryville-Alcoa Daily Times, April 7, 2008
  6. ^ "Denso Tennessee names new president," The Knoxville News-Sentinel, April 1, 2008
  7. ^ Blount County, National Association of Counties website
  8. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  
  10. ^ Maryville-Alcoa-Blount County Parks & Rec website
  11. ^ Maryville Christian School website
  12. ^ Millard, B. "Maryville Christian welcomes record class," The Maryville-Alcoa Daily Times, Sept. 17, 2006
  13. ^ Tucker, M. "New Montessori Middle construction progressing," The Maryville-Alcoa Daily Times, April 15, 2008
  14. ^ ETHRA homepage
  • Inez Burns (1995). History of Blount County, Tennessee. Windmill Publications.

External links

Coordinates: 35°41′N 83°56′W / 35.69°N 83.93°W / 35.69; -83.93


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

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Blount County, Tennessee
Map
File:Map of Tennessee highlighting Blount County.png
Location in the state of Tennessee
Map of the USA highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded 1795
Seat Maryville
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 1.43%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

105823
Time zone Eastern : UTC-5/-4
Website: www.blounttn.org

Blount County is a U.S. county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. Its population was 105,823 at the United States Census. The 2006 Census Estimate placed the population at 118,186 [1]. The county seat is at Maryville6, which is also the county's largest city.

It is included in the Knoxville Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

History

What is today Blount County was for many thousands of years Indian territory, passed down to the Cherokee tribe that claimed the land upon the arrival of white settlers in the late 18th century. Shortly thereafter, On July 11, 1795, Blount County became the tenth county established in Tennessee, when the Territorial Legislature voted to split adjacent Knox and Jefferson counties. The new county was named for the governor of the state of Tennessee, William Blount, and its county seat, Maryville, was named for his wife Mary Grainger Blount. This establishment, however, did little to settle the differences between white immigrants and Cherokee natives, which was, for the most part, not accomplished until an 1819 treaty[2].

Throughout its history the boundaries of Blount County have been altered numerous times, most notably in 1870 when a large swath of western Blount was split into Loudon and portions of other counties. Also, the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in 1936, while not affecting the territory of Blount County, has significantly impacted the use of southeastern Blount[3].

Economy

Most of the early settlers were of very little means, existing on subsistence-based agriculture throughout the early years of the county's establishment. The first industry to make its mark on Blount County, as in other neighboring counties, was that of lumber. It was the massive development of this industry in the mountains of east Blount that, in part, led to the creation of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which includes the southeastern portion of the county. Today manufacturing is [4]

Government

The following list consists of the current elected members of the Blount County government[5]:

  • County Mayor: Jerry Cunningham
  • Commissioners: Bob Arwood', Bob Profitt, Dennis Cardin , Donna Dowdy , W. C. Evans, Joe Everett, Gary Farmer, David Graham, Steve Gray, Steve Hargis, John Keeble, Bob Kidd, Robby Kirkland , Jeff McCall, Kenneth Melton, David Ballard, Otto Slater, Ernest Tallent, Shirley Townsend, and Mike Walker
  • Sheriff: James Berrong
  • Highway Chief Administrative Officer: Bill Dunlap
  • Trustee: Scott Graves
  • Assessor of Property: Mike Morton
  • County Clerk: Roy Crawford Jr.
  • Register of Deeds: Penny Whaley
  • Clerk & Master: James Carroll
  • Circuit Court Clerk: Thomas Hatcher

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,468 km² (567 sq mi). 1,447 km² (559 sq mi) of it is land and 21 km² (8 sq mi) of it (1.43%) is water.

The foothills of the Appalachian Mountains determine much of Blount County's landscape, with a segment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park extending into southeastern Blount County. In addition to the dominant mountains, the Little Tennessee River flows through the county and forms several man-made lakes created by the Tennessee Valley Authority.

Adjacent counties

Geographical features

Demographics

Age pyramid Blount County[1]

As of the census² of 2000, there were 105,823 people, 42,667 households, and 30,634 families residing in the county. The population density was 73/km² (190/sq mi). There were 47,059 housing units at an average density of 33/km² (84/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 94.73% White, 2.91% Black or African American, 0.29% Native American, 0.72% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.34% from other races, and 0.99% from two or more races. 1.06% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 42,667 households out of which 30.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.40% were married couples living together, 10.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.20% are classified as non-families by the United States Census Bureau. Of the 42,667 households, 1,384 are unmarried partner households: 1,147 heterosexual, 107 same-sex male, 130 same-sex female. 24.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.80% under the age of 18, 8.30% from 18 to 24, 29.40% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 14.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,862, and the median income for a family was $45,038. Males had a median income of $31,877 versus $23,007 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,416. About 7.30% of families and 9.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.30% of those under age 18 and 9.10% of those age 65 or over.

Infrastructure

Parks

In addition to the federally operated Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which draws many visitors to the county each year, Blount County operates numerous smaller community parks and recreation centers, primarily in the cities of Alcoa and Maryville. Some of these facilities include[6]:

  • Amerine Park (Maryville)
  • Bassell Courts (Alcoa)
  • Eagleton Park (Maryville)
  • Everett Athletic Complex (Maryville)
  • Everett Park/Everett Senior Center (Maryville)
  • Howe Street Park (Alcoa)
  • John Sevier Park/Pool (Maryville)
  • Louisville Point Park (Louisville)
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Center (Alcoa)
  • Oldfield Mini Park (Alcoa)
  • Pearson Springs Park (Maryville)
  • Pole Climbers Athletic Fields (Alcoa)
  • Richard Williams Park (Alcoa)
  • Rock Garden Park (Alcoa)
  • Sandy Springs Park (Maryville)
  • Springbrook Park/Pool (Alcoa)

Schools, Colleges and Universities

See Blount County Schools for a full list of county schools.

Blount County is home to two post-secondary educational institutions: Maryville College, in downtown Maryville, and a satellite campus of Knoxville based Pellissippi State Technical Community College, referred to as Pellissippi State Technical Community College, Blount County Campus.

Transportation

Paratransit

Blount County is served by the East Tennessee Human Resource Agency's Public Transit system. ETHRA, as it is commonly referred to, operates over sixteen counties in eastern Tennessee, and is headquartered in the nearby city of Loudon. The service offers residents of any of the counties covered by ETHRA door-to-door pickup transportation across its service area by request only[7].

Airports

TYS, McGhee Tyson Airport

Highways

Cities and towns

Map of Blount County, Tennessee showing cities, CDPs, and townships.

References

  1. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  • Inez Burns (1995). History of Blount County, Tennessee. Windmill Publications.

External links


Coordinates: 35°41′N 83°56′W / 35.69, -83.93

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Blount County, Tennessee. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Blount County, TennesseeRDF feed
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Tennessee  +
Short name Blount County  +

This article uses material from the "Blount County, Tennessee" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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