The Full Wiki

Blues scale: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The term blues scale is used to describe a few scales with differing number of pitches and related characteristics.

The hexatonic, or six note, blues scale consists of the minor pentatonic scale plus the 4 or 5 degree[1][2][3]. A major feature of the blues scale is the use of blue notes,[4 ] however, since blue notes are considered alternative inflections, a blues scale may be considered to not fit the traditional definition of a scale.[5] At its most basic, a single version of this "blues scale" is commonly used over all changes (or chords) in a twelve bar blues progression.[6] Likewise, in contemporary jazz theory, its use is commonly based upon the key rather than the individual chord.[2]

Blues scale as minor pentatonic plus flat-5th/sharp-4th

The heptatonic, or seven note, conception of the "blues scale" is as a diatonic scale (a major scale) with lowered third, fifth, and seventh degrees[7] and blues practice is derived from the "conjunction of 'African scales' and the diatonic western scales".[8] Steven Smith argues that, "to assign blues notes to a 'blues scale' is a momentous mistake, then, after all, unless we alter the meaning of 'scale'.[9]

Blues scale as diatonic scale with lowered 3rd, 5th, and 7th degrees

Despite this, an essentially nine note blues scale is defined by Benward and Saker[10] as a chromatic variation of the major scale featuring a flat third and seventh degrees which, "alternating with the normal third and seventh scale degrees are used to create the blues inflection. These 'blue notes' represent the influence of African scales on this music."[11]

Blues scale as a chromatic variant of the major scale

References

  1. ^ Ferguson, Jim (2000). All Blues Scale for Jazz Guitar, p.6. ISBN 0786652136.
  2. ^ a b Arnold, Bruce (2002). The Essentials: Chord Charts, Scales and Lead Patterns for Guitar, p.8. ISBN 1890944947.
  3. ^ Harrison, Mark (2003). Blues Piano: Hal Leonard Keyboard Style Series, p.8. ISBN 0634061690.
  4. ^ "The Pentatonic and Blues Scale". How To Play Blues Guitar. 2008-07-09. http://how-to-play-blues-guitar.com/blues-concepts/the-pentatonic-and-blues-scale/. Retrieved 2008-07-11.  
  5. ^ J. Bradford Robinson/Barry Kernfeld. "Blue Note", The New Grove Dictionary of Jazz, Second Edition, London (2002)
  6. ^ "Blues Licks From Blues Scales". Between the Licks. 2008-02-25. http://betweenthelicks.com/blues-guitar/blues-licks-from-blues-scales. Retrieved 2008-06-24.  
  7. ^ Smallwood, Richard (1980). "Gospel and Blues Improvisation" p.102, Music Educators Journal, Vol. 66, No. 5. (Jan., 1980), p.100-104.
  8. ^ Oliver, Paul. "That Certain Feeling: Blues and Jazz... in 1890?" p.13, Popular Music, Vol. 10, No. 1, The 1890s. (Jan., 1991), pp. 11-19. Cites Rudi Blesh.
  9. ^ Smith, Steven G. (1992). "Blues and Our Mind-Body Problem", Popular Music, Vol. 11, No. 1. (Jan., 1992), pp. 41-52.
  10. ^ Benward & Saker (2003). Music: In Theory and Practice, Vol. I, p.39. Seventh Edition. ISBN 978-0-07-294262-0.
  11. ^ Gunther Schuller. Early Jazz: Its Roots and Musical Development (New York: Oxford University Press, 1968), pp.46-52). Cited in Benward & Saker (2003), p.39.

External links

Advertisements

Simple English

The blues scale is a hexatonic scale with minor pentatonic scale.[1][2][3] But, because blues notes (or blue notes) have a different form, there can be no one blues scale[4]. As named in contemporary jazz theory, its use is based on the key and not the chord,[2] unlike some chords in jazz. The semitone differences for a blues scale are 3-2-1-1-3-2 for instance- C-Eb-F-F#-G-Bb-C

References

  1. Ferguson, Jim (2000). All Blues Scale for Jazz Guitar, p.6. ISBN 0786652136.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Arnold, Bruce (2002). The Essentials: Chord Charts, Scales and Lead Patterns for Guitar, p.8. ISBN 1890944947.
  3. Harrison, Mark (2003). Blues Piano: Hal Leonard Keyboard Style Series, p.8. ISBN 0634061690.
  4. J. Bradford Robinson/Barry Kernfeld. "Blue Note", The New Grove Dictionary of Jazz, Second Edition, London (2002)


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message