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Bob Feerick
Position(s) Forward/Guard
Jersey #(s) 10
Listed height 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Listed weight 190 lb (86 kg)
Born January 2, 1920(1920-01-02)
Died June 8, 1976 (aged 56)
Career information
Year(s) 1946–1950
College Santa Clara University
Professional team(s)
Career stats (NBA and/or ABA)
Points     2,936
Rebounds     None recorded
Assists     440
Stats @ Basketball-Reference.com
Career highlights and awards
Coaching

Robert Joseph (Bob) Feerick (January 2, 1920 – June 8, 1976) was an American professional basketball player, coach and general manager. He was born in San Francisco, California.

A 6-3 guard from Santa Clara University, Feerick played for the Washington Capitols from 1946 to 1950, the NBA's first four seasons of existence (the league was known as the Basketball Association of America during the first three).[1] Playing under coach Red Auerbach, he was named to the All NBA First Team during 1947 and 1948 after averaging 16.8 (second behind Joe Fulks's 23.1) and 16.1 points per game respectively. In 1949, the league's first season as the newly formed NBA, the Capitols named Feerick player-coach. In 221 games, he scored 2936 points for an average of 13.3 per game.[2]

After his short pro career, Feerick returned Santa Clara to head-coach its basketball team.[3] In addition to coaching the Capitols while still an active player, Feerick also was Wilt Chamberlain's coach with the San Francisco Warriors during the 1962-63 season.[4] The franchise had just relocated from Philadelphia and hired Feerick, the native San Franciscan, to replace Frank McGuire, who resigned rather than make the move with the team. The Warriors finished 31-49 in their first year in San Francisco after losing to the Boston Celtics in each of the previous three Eastern Division finals. The following season, Alex Hannum replaced Feerick as coach.

He was nominated into NBA 25th Anniversary Team on 1971.[5]

Notes

External links

Preceded by
Red Auerbach
Washington Capitols Head Coach
1949–1950
Succeeded by
Bones McKinney
Preceded by
Sam Pesco
Santa Clara Broncos Head Coach
1950–1962
Succeeded by
Dick Garibaldi
Preceded by
Frank McGuire
San Francisco Warriors head coach
1962–1963
Succeeded by
Alex Hannum
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