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Boeing Model 40: Wikis

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Boeing Model 40
Role Mail plane
Manufacturer Boeing
First flight 20 July 1925
Introduced 1 July 1927
Number built ca. 80

The Boeing Model 40 was a United States mail plane that became the first aircraft built by the Boeing company to carry passengers. It was of conventional biplane configuration with a combination of standard and warren-truss style interplane struts. Originally designed to compete for a US Mail contract in 1925, it was rejected in favour of the Douglas M-2.

The design was revived in 1927 as part of Boeing's tender for newly-privatised airmail routes. Designated the Model 40A, this variant was powered by an air-cooled Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine, which offered a 200 lb weight saving over the water-cooled Liberty specified by the postal service in 1925. Although the primary purpose of the aircraft was to carry mail, two passengers could be accommodated in the small cabin, allowing Boeing to operate it on any of the routes that the firm might bid for. The original fuselage design was changed to one using welded steel tubing.

Boeing successfully bid on the San Francisco-Chicago route, and Boeing Air Transport commenced operations on 1 July 1927 with 24 Model 40As.

Contents

Survivors

As of February 17, 2008, Boeing 40C S/N 1043 became the only airworthy example in the world. It also holds the title of the oldest flying Boeing in the world. In 1928, the aircraft was substantially damaged in a crash near Canyonville, OR. After being recovered, it was completely rebuilt over a eight year period and an estimated 18,000 man hours by Pemberton and Sons Aviation in Spokane, Washington.[1].

The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, contains a 1927 Boeing 40B-2, number 285.

The Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, Illinois has a 1928 Boeing Model 40-B on display in its Transportation Gallery. (N288)

The Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington has a complete full-scale replica and two partially finished replica fuselages (showing what the original Boeing factory would have looked like circa 1928-29) on display.

Model 40C Pilot's panel with some modern features added for safe operation

Variants

Model 40
Original 1925 design with Liberty engine.
Model 40A
Revised 1927 design for BATC. the aircraft was powered by a Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine, plus seating for two passengers in an enclosed cabin; 25 built.
Model 40B
Model 40As re-engined with a 525-hp (391-kW) Pratt & Whitney Hornet radial piston engine. 19 Model 40A were converted. Redesignated Model 40B-2.
Model 40B-4
Revised Model 40B with seating for four passengers and other improvements. Equipped with openable windows, plus seating for four passengers; 38 built.
Model 40B-4A
One Model 40B used as engine testbed by Pratt & Whitney.
Model 40H-4
Four Model 40B-4s built by Boeing Canada. Two aircraft were exported on New Zealand.
Boeing Model 40C at Oshkosh 2008
Model 40C
Similar to Model 40B-4 but with Pratt & Whitney Wasp engine of Model 40A. (10 built, all later converted to Model 40B-4 standard).[2][3]
Model 40X
Unique special-order machine similar to Model 40C with only two-passenger cabin and extra open cockpit forward of pilot's cockpit.
Model 40Y
Unique special-order machine similar to Model 40X, but with Pratt & Whitney Hornet engine.
Model 40C at Oshkosh 2008. Both passenger entry doors, one for each of the two-seat rows, are on the left side of the fuselage.

Operators

 United States

Specifications (Model 40A)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 2 passengers
  • Length: 33 ft 2 in (10.12 m)
  • Wingspan: 44 ft 2 in (13.47 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 3 in (3.73 m)
  • Wing area: 547 sq ft (50.82 m²)
  • Empty weight: 3,531 lb (1602 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 6000 lb (2722 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1× Pratt & Whitney Wasp, 420 hp (313 kW)

Performance

Model 40C front seat of rear passenger cabin showing the fold-down writing desk/table.

See also

References

  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 170. 
  • World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. File 890 Sheet 52. 

Boeing History - Boeing Model 40A Commercial Transport Retrieved June 17, 2006.


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