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Boeing YB-9/Y1B-9
Y1B-9 test flight, 1932.
Role Bomber aircraft
Manufacturer Boeing
Designed by John Sanders
First flight 1931-04-29
Introduced 1931-11-05
Retired 1934
Status No surviving examples
Primary user United States Army Air Corps
Produced 1930-1933
Number built 7

The Boeing B-9 was the first all-metal monoplane bomber aircraft designed for the United States Army Air Corps. The first service model, dubbed the YB-9, was originally tested and developed by the United States aircraft manufacturing company Boeing as XB-901 and first flew on April 29, 1931. The YB-9 was an enlarged alteration of Boeing's Model 200 Commercial Transport. The Pratt & Whitney R-1830-13 radial engines used on the YB-9 gave it a top speed of 163 mph (262 km/h).

The second test model, named the Y1B-9 (Y1 indicating funding outside normal fiscal year procurement), originally used liquid-cooled Curtiss V-1570-29 'Conqueror' engines. The increased power from these engines, combined with increased streamlining of the engine nacelles, increased its top speed to 173 mph (278 km/h). With the exception of the B-2 Condor, liquid-cooled engines were never used on production bombers for the United States military. The air-cooled radial engine was lighter and more reliable than the liquid-cooled engine, and less vulnerable to enemy damage.

The Y1B-9A was an improved version of the YB-9, featuring more powerful engines and a redesigned vertical stabilizer. Utilising two Pratt & Whitney R-1860-11 Hornet engines, the plane equalled the speed of all existing American fighter aircraft.[1] While enclosed canopys were consided and designed, the B-9 was never fitted.

For all the advances the B-9 offered, it was quickly superseded by the performance of the next generation of Martin bombers; the B10 (121 built) & B-12 (32 built).

Contents

Variations

First flight: 29 April 1931
  • YB-9 (1 produced). Pratt & Whitney R-1830-13 (575 hp). Reengined with supercharged Pratt & Whitney R-1830-11 (600 hp) and was fitted with three-bladed propellers. Trim tab ran the full height of the rudder
Boeing model B-215
contract number: XB-901
s/n: 32-301 (c/n: 1459) (NX10633)
  • Y1B-9 (1 produced). Curtiss GIV-1570 (V-1570-29) (600 hp). Reengined with supercharged Pratt & Whitney R-1830-11 (600 hp) and was fitted with three-bladed propellers. Short trim tab on rudder.
Boeing model B-214
s/n: 32-302 (c/n: 1458)
  • Y1B-9A (5 produced). Pratt & Whitney Y1G1SR-1860B (R-1860-11) (600 hp). Metal instead of fabric covering on the control surfaces. There were also many internal structural and equipment changes
Boeing model B-246
s/n: 32-303 / 32-307 (c/n: 1671 / 1675)

Operators

 United States
  • United States Army Air Corp
Wright Field
2nd BG
20th BG
49th BG

Specifications (Y1B-9A)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 4
  • Length: 51 ft 6 in (15.7 m)
  • Wingspan: 76 ft 10 in (23.4 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 8 in (3.86 m)
  • Wing area: 954 ft² (88.6 m²)
  • Empty weight: 8,941 lb (4,056 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 13,932 lb (6,320 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 14,320 lb (6,500 kg)
  • Powerplant:Pratt & Whitney R-1860-11 "Hornet" radial engine, 600 hp (450 kW) each

Performance

Armament

  • Guns: 2× .30 in (7.62 mm) machine guns
  • Bombs: 2,200 lb (1,000 kg) bombs

References

See also

Related development

Comparable aircraft

Related lists

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Boeing YB-9/Y1B-9
Y1B-9 test flight, 1932.
Role Bomber aircraft
Manufacturer Boeing
First flight 1931-04-29
Retired 1934
Status No surviving examples
Primary user United States Army Air Corps
Produced 1930-1933
Number built 7

The Boeing B-9 was the first all-metal monoplane bomber aircraft designed for the United States Army Air Corps. The first service model, dubbed the YB-9, was originally tested and developed by the United States aircraft manufacturing company Boeing as XB-901 and first flew on April 29, 1931. The YB-9 was an enlarged alteration of Boeing's Model 200 Commercial Transport. The Pratt & Whitney R-1830-13 radial engines used on the YB-9 gave it a top speed of 163 mph (262 km/h).

The second test model, named the Y1B-9 (Y1 indicating funding outside normal fiscal year procurement), used liquid-cooled Curtiss V-1570-29 'Conqueror' engines. The increased power from these engines, combined with increased streamlining of the engine nacelles, increased its top speed to 173 mph (278 km/h). With the exception of the B-2 Condor, liquid-cooled engines were never used on production bombers for the United States military. The air-cooled radial engine was lighter and more reliable than the liquid-cooled engine, and less vulnerable to enemy damage.

The Y1B-9A was an improved version of the YB-9, featuring more powerful engines and a redesigned vertical stabilizer. Utilising two Pratt & Whitney R-1860-11 Hornet engines, the plane equalled the speed of all existing American fighter aircraft.[1] The Y1B-9 was the first enclosed-cockpit plane flown by the Army. Its high speeds made open cockpits extremely impractical. Five were ordered by the Army in September 1931.

Specifications (Y1B-9A)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 4
  • Length: 51 ft 6 in (15.7 m)
  • Wingspan: 76 ft 10 in (23.4 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 8 in (3.86 m)
  • Wing area: 954 ft² (88.6 m²)
  • Empty weight: 8,941 lb (4,056 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 13,932 lb (6,320 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 14,320 lb (6,500 kg)
  • Powerplant:Pratt & Whitney R-1860-11 "Hornet" radial engine, 600 hp (450 kW) each

Performance

Armament
  • Guns: 2× .30 in (7.26 mm) machine guns
  • Bombs: 2,200 lb (1,000 kg) bombs
 

References

See also

Related development

  • Boeing Monomail

Comparable aircraft

Related lists


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