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Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bond, bonds, bonded, and bonding may refer to:

Contents

Fiduciary bonds

  • Bond (finance), in finance, a type of debt security
    • Government bond, a bond issued by a national government
      • War bonds, a type of government bond used to raise funding for a war effort
    • Municipal bond, a bond issued by a city or local government
    • Corporate bond, a bond issued by a corporation
    • Mortgage bond, in South Africa a bond or mortgage bond is the usual term for property mortgage.
  • Insurance bond (or investment bond), a life assurance-based single premium investment
  • Surety bond, a three party contract, where the surety promises to pay the obligee for non-performance or dishonesty by the principal
    • Performance bond, a surety bond for completion of work under a contract
    • Bail bond, a surety bond for return of a person to a court
  • Tenancy bond (or damage deposit), a deposit taken by a landlord in relation to rental of a property
  • Catastrophe bond (or cat bond), a form of reinsurance
  • Bonded labor (or debt bondage), a system of servitude where someone must work to pay off a debt
  • Bond of association, a basic building block of credit unions and co-operative banks
  • Bond vigilante, a form of political protest by selling bonds

Other legal terms

Physical sciences

  • Bond number, in fluid mechanics, a dimensionless number expressing the ratio of gravitational forces to surface tension forces
  • Chemical bond, the physical phenomenon of chemical substances being held together by attraction of atoms
  • Bond albedo, a measure of electromagnetic radiation of an astronomical body
  • Bond graph, a graphical description of a physical dynamic system
  • Bond fluctuation model, a lattice model for simulating the conformation and dynamics of polymer systems
  • The Bond (Chinese constellation), both a mansion in the White Tiger constellation and an asterism within that mansion
  • Bond Crater, a crater on Mars

Social sciences

Manufacturing, construction and electronics

  • Bond, the manner in which the bricks overlap as they are laid in brickwork
  • Bond paper, a high quality durable writing paper
  • Bonded leather (or reconstituted leather)
  • Bottled in bond, referring to a type of American whiskey
  • Wire bonding, a method of making interconnections between a microchip and the outside world as part of semiconductor device fabrication
  • Channel bonding (or modem bonding), an arrangement in which two or more network interfaces on a host computer are combined
  • Electrical bonding, practice of connecting all metal objects in a room to protect from electric shock

Company and product names

Organizations

Entertainment

  • The James Bond series of spy fiction originally created by Ian Fleming
    • James Bond (character), a British secret agent who is the central character in the series
    • James Bond novels, the original literary works by Fleming, plus works by other authors after Fleming's death (usually commissioned by the owner of the Fleming copyrights, a company now known as Ian Fleming Publications)
    • James Bond film series, a popular series of 25 films featuring Fleming's secret agent
  • Campion Bond, the fictional character from The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen
  • Bond (band), an Australian/British string quartet
    • Bond: Video Clip Collection, a video collection from the band
  • The Bond, a film by Charlie Chaplin supporting Liberty bonds
  • "The Bonding", a third-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation
  • Bond Street (film), a 1948 British film

Places

United States

People

Other uses

  • Peace-bonding, something which makes a weapon unusable as a weapon

See also


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

BOND,' in English law, an obligation by deed. Its design is to secure that the obligor, i.e. the person giving the bond, will either pay a sum of money, or do or refrain from doing some act; and for this purpose the obligor binds himself in a penalty to the obligee, with a condition added that, if the obligor pays the sum secured - which is usually half the penalty - or does or refrains from doing the specified act, the bond shall be void: otherwise it shall remain in full force. This condition is known as the defeasance because it defeats or undoes the bond. The form of a common money bond runs as follows: Know All Men by these presents that I, A. B. (name, address and description of obligor), am bound to C. D. (name, address and description of obligee) in the sum of £[2000] to be paid to the said (obligee), his executors, administrators or assigns or to his or their attorney or attorneys, for which payment I bind myself by these presents. Sealed with my seal. Dated this day of iq .

The condition of the above-written bond is such that if the above A. B. his heirs, executors or administrators, shall on the day of pay to the above-named C. D., his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns the sum of [ 1000], with interest for the same from the date of the above-written bond at the rate of per cent per annum without any deduction, then the above-written bond shall be void: otherwise the bond shall remain in full force. Signed, sealed and delivered by the above-named A. B.

in the presence of (witness) Recitals are frequently added to explain the circumstances under which the bond is given.

If the condition is not performed, i.e. if the obligor does not pay the money by the day stipulated, or do or refrain from doing the act provided for, the bond becomes forfeit or absolute at law, and charges the obligor and his estate (see Conveyancing Act 1881, s. 59). In old days, when a bond was forfeit, the whole penalty was recoverable at law and payment post diem could not be pleaded to an action on it, but the court of chancery early interposed to prevent oppression. It held the penalty of a bond to be the form, not the substance of it, a pledge merely to secure repayment of the sum bona fide advanced, and would not permit a man to take more than in conscience he ought, i.e. in case of a common money bond, his principal, interest and expenses. This equitable relief received statutory recognition by an act of 1705, which provided that, in case of a common money bond, payment of the lesser sum with interest and costs shall be taken in full satisfaction of the bond. An obligee of a common money bond can, since the date of the Judicature Act, obtain summary judgment under 0. xiv. (R.S.C. 1883) by specially endorsing his writ under O. iii. R. 6.

Bonds were, however, and still are given to secure performance of a variety of matters other than the payment of a sum of money at a fixed date. They may be given and are given, for instance, 1 This word, meaning "that which binds," is a phonetic variant of "band," and is derived from the Teutonic root seen in bindan, to bind; it must be distinguished from the obsolete "bond," meaning originally a householder. In the laws of Canute this word is used as equal to the Old English ceorl (see Churl), and thus, as the churl's position became less free after the Norman Conquest, the "bond" approximated to the "villein," and still later to the "serf." The word is in Old English bonda, and appears in "husband" (q.v.), and is derived from the root of the verb bz a, to dwell, to have a house, the Latin colere, and thus in origin is cognate with German Bauer and English "boor," The transition in meaning to the idea of serfdom, and hence to slavery, is due to an early confusion with "bond," from "bind." The same wrong connexion appears in the transition of meaning in "bondage," properly "tenure in villeinage," but now used as synonymous with "slavery." A trace of the early meaning still survives in "bondager" (q.v.).

to guarantee the fidelity of a clerk, of a rent collector, or of a person in an office of public trust, or to secure that an intended husband will settle a sum on his wife in the event of her surviving him, or that a building contract shall be carried out, or that a rival business shall not be carried on by the obligor except within certain limits of time and space. The same object can often be attained - and more conveniently attained - by a covenant than by bond, and covenants have in the practice of conveyancers largely superseded bonds, but there are cases where security by bond is still preferable to security by covenant. Thus under a bond to secure an annuity, if the obligor makes default, judgment may be entered for the penalty and stand as security for the future payments without the necessity of bringing a fresh action for each payment. In cases of bonds with special conditions, such as those instanced above, the remedy of the obligee for breach of the condition is prescribed by an act of 1696, the procedure under which is preserved by the Judicature Act (0. xxii. R. i, 0. xiii. R. 14). The obligee assigns the particular breaches of which he complains, damages in respect of such breaches are assessed, and, on payment into court by the obligor of the amount of such damages, the court enters a stay of execution. A difficulty which has much exercised and still exercises the courts is to determine, in these cases of special conditions, whether the sum for which the bond is given is a true penalty or only liquidated damages. There is nothing to prevent the parties to a bond from agreeing the damages for a breach, and if they have done so, the court will not interfere, as it will in the case of a penalty. The leading case on the subject is Kemble v. Farren (1829; 6 Bing. 148).

Bonds given to secure the doing of anything which is contrary to the policy of the law are void. Such, for instance, is a bond given to a woman for future cohabitation (as distinguished from past cohabitation), or a marriage brocage bond, that is, a bond given to procure a marriage between parties. (See the matrimonial agency case, Hermann v. Charlesworth, 1905, 2 K.B. 123). It was not without design that Shakespeare laid the scene of Shylock's suit on Antonio's bond in a Venetian court; the bond would have had short shrift in an English court.

Post Obit Bonds

A post obit bond is one given by an expectant heir or legatee, payable on or after the death of the person from whom the obligor has expectations. Such a bond, if the obligee has exacted unconscionable terms, may be set aside.

Bottomry Bonds

A bottomry bond is a contract of hypothecation by which the owner of a ship, or the master as his agent, borrows money for the use of the ship to meet some emergency, e.g. necessary repairs, and pledges the ship (or keel or bottom of the ship, partem pro toto) as security for repayment. If the ship safely accomplishes her voyage, the obligee gets his money back with the agreed interest: if the ship is totally lost, he loses it altogether.

Lloyd's Bonds, - Lloyd's bonds are instruments under the seal of a railway company, admitting the indebtedness of the company to the obligee to a specified amount for work done or goods supplied, with a covenant to pay him such amount with interest on a future day. They are a device by which railway companies were enabled to increase their indebtedness without technically violating their charter. The name is derived from the counsel who settled the form of the bond.

Debenture Bonds. - Debenture bonds are bonds secured only by the covenant of the company without any floating or fixed charge on the assets. (See Debentures And Debenture Stock.) Recognizance. - A recognizance differs from a bond in being entered into before a court of record and thereby becoming an obligation of record.

Heritable bond is a Scots law term, meaning a bond for money, joined with a conveyance of land, and held by a creditor as security for his debt.

For goods "in bond" see BONDED WAREHOUSE. (E. MA.)


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010
(Redirected to bond article)

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

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Contents

English

Etymology

Phonetic variant of band, influenced by Old English bonda.

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
bond

Plural
bonds

bond (plural bonds)

  1. (law) Evidence of a long-term debt, by which the bond issuer (the borrower) is obliged to pay interest when due, and repay the principal at maturity, as specified on the face of the bond certificate. The rights of the holder are specified in the bond indenture, which contains the legal terms and conditions under which the bond was issued. Bonds are available in two forms: registered bonds, and bearer bonds.
  2. (finance) A documentary obligation to pay a sum or to perform a contract; a debenture.
    Many say that government and corporate bonds are a good investment to balance against a portfolio consisting primarily of stocks.
  3. A physical connection which binds, a band; often plural.
    The prisoner was brought before the tribunal in iron bonds.
  4. An emotional link, connection or union.
    They had grown up as friends and neighbors, and not even vastly differing political views could break the bond of their friendship.
  5. (chemistry) A link or force between neighbouring atoms in a molecule.
    Organic chemistry primarily consists of the study of carbon bonds, in their many variations.
  6. A binding agreement, a covenant.
    Herbert resented his wife for subjecting him to the bonds of matrimony; he claimed they had gotten married while drunk.
  7. A sum of money paid as bail or surety.
    The bailiff released the prisoner as soon as the bond was posted.
  8. Any constraining or cementing force or material.
    A bond of superglue adhered the teacups to the ceiling, much to the consternation of the cafe owners.
  9. (construction) In building, a specific pattern of bricklaying.
  10. In Scotland, a mortgage.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

Infinitive
to bond

Third person singular
bonds

Simple past
bonded

Past participle
bonded

Present participle
bonding

to bond (third-person singular simple present bonds, present participle bonding, simple past and past participle bonded)

  1. (transitive) To connect, secure or tie with a bond; to bind.
    The gargantuan ape was bonded in iron chains and carted onto the stage.
  2. (transitive) To cause to adhere (one material with another).
    The children bonded their snapshots to the scrapbook pages with mucilage.
  3. (transitive, chemistry) To form a chemical compound with.
    Under unusual conditions, even gold can be made to bond with other elements.
  4. (transitive) To guarantee or secure a financial risk.
    The contractor was bonded with a local underwriter.
  5. To form a friendship or emotional connection.
    The men had bonded while serving together in Vietnam.
  6. (transitive) To put in a bonded warehouse.
  7. (transitive, construction) To lay bricks in a specific pattern.
  8. (transitive, electricity) To make a reliable electrical connection between two conductors (or any pieces of metal that may potentially become conductors).
    A house's distribution panel should always be bonded to the grounding rods via a panel bond.

Translations


Dutch

Noun

bond m. (plural bonden)

  1. union

French

Etymology

From bondir.

Pronunciation

Noun

bond m. (plural bonds)

  1. jump, bound, leap
  2. bounce

Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to James Bond (ornithologist) article)

From Wikispecies

(1900-1989)


Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki


an obligation of any kind (Num. 30:2, 4, 12). The word means also oppression or affliction (Ps. 116:16; Phil. 1:7). Christian love is the "bond of perfectness" (Col. 3:14), and the influences of the Spirit are the "bond of peace" (Eph. 4:3).

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

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Simple English

Simple English Wiktionary has the word meaning for:

Uses of bond, bonds, bonded, and bonding:

Contents

Financial bonds

  • Bond (finance), in finance, a debt security, issued by Issuer
    • Government bond, a bond issued by a national government
    • Bond market, a financial market for bonds
  • Investment bond, a life assurance based single premium investment
  • A surety bond is a three party contract, where the surety promises to pay the obligee for non-performance or dishonesty by the principal. Workers in many jobs must be bonded. [1]
    • A performance bond is a surety bond for completion of work under a contract
    • A bail bond is a surety bond for return of a person to a court
  • Tenancy bond (or damage deposit), a deposit taken by a landlord in relation to rental of a property
  • Catastrophe bond (or cat bond), a form of reinsurance
  • Bonded labor (or debt bondage) is a system of servitude where someone must work to pay off a debt

Physical sciences

Social sciences

  • In biology, a pair bond is the strong affinity that develops in some species between the male and female in a breeding pair.
  • Psychological bond, a form of relationship
    • Human bonding
    • Maternal bond
    • Paternal bond
    • Male bonding
    • Female bonding
    • Affectional bond
    • Capture-bonding, the evolved psychological mechanism behind Stockholm syndrome
  • In anthropology, acephalous societies are categorized as village-bonded, land-bonded, and lineage-bonded

Manufacturing, construction and electronics

  • In manufacturing, bonding may be done via adhesives, welding, or fasteners (such as screws, bolts, nails, rivets)
  • Bond is the manner in which the bricks overlap as they are laid in brickwork
  • Bond paper, a high quality durable writing paper
  • Bonded Leather (or reconstituted leather)
  • Bottled in bond refers to a type American whiskey
  • Wire bonding, a method of making interconnections between a microchip and the outside world as part of semiconductor device fabrication
  • Channel bonding (or modem bonding), an arrangement in which two or more network interfaces on a host computer are combined
  • Electrical bonding, concept in electricity distribution

Company and product names

  • Bonds (company) an Australian clothing company
  • Bonds was formerly the name of a department store in Norwich, England, now called John Lewis Norwich
  • Bonds was formerly the name of a department store in Chelmsford, Essex, now called Debenhams Chelmsford
  • Bond Cars Ltd a small scale car manufacturer between 1949 and 1971 manufacturer of the Bond bug and Bond 875 three-wheeled motor cars
  • BOND, RAD Software tool
  • Gold Bond medicated powder
  • Bond Street brand of cigarette
  • Eaton's Corrasable Bond was a brand of erasable typing paper
  • Bond Guitars manufactured the Bond Electraglide electric guitar

Organizations

  • Afrikaner Bond, a political party in the Cape Colony in the 19th century
  • bonding-studenteninitiative e.V., a German student organisation
  • Church of the Universal Bond, a British religious group

Entertainment

  • James Bond, a fictional secret agent created by Ian Fleming
    • Bond 22 is the working title of a future James Bond film
  • bond is an Australian/British string quartet
  • The Bond a film by Charlie Chaplin supporting Liberty Bonds
  • "The Bonding", a third-season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation
  • Any Bonds Today?, a propaganda film for War Bonds during World War II

Other uses

  • Peace-bonding is something which makes a weapon unusable as a weapon
  • A peace bond is a protection order from a Canadian court

Places

  • Bond Street, a major shopping street in the West End of London
  • Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia
    • Bond South Africa, South African campus of Bond University
  • Bonds in New York City
  • Bond, Colorado
  • Bond Hill, Ohio
  • Bond Falls, a waterfall in the Ontonagon River
  • Mount Bond, a mountain in Grafton County, New Hampshire
  • Bond Head, Ontario
  • Bond County, Illinois

Other pages








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