The Full Wiki

More info on Bonus track

Bonus track: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In terms of recorded music, a bonus track (also known as a bonus cut or bonus) is a piece of music which has been included on specific releases or reissues of an album. This is most often done as a promotional device, either as an incentive to customers to purchase albums they might otherwise not, or to repurchase albums they already own. In contrast to hidden tracks, bonus tracks are included on track listings.

Many international releases — most commonly Japanese releases of European or American albums, but not confined to just Japan, or just music going from West to East — contain a few bonus tracks. These are often B-sides from singles. Alternate takes are other tracks often released as bonus tracks. It has also been said that this is the industry's way to get consumers to purchase albums from Japanese distributors, instead of sometimes less expensive imports from the West.

It's not uncommon to release singles as bonus tracks on re-issues of old albums, where those weren't originally included.

With the advent of online music stores, such as Apple's iTunes Music Store, à la carte song buying has become the norm. Bonus tracks are often included if a customer buys a whole album rather than just one or two hit songs from the artist. The song is not necessarily free nor is it available as a stand alone download, adding also to the incentive to buy the complete album.

The bonus track as a marketing technique: Japan as a nation is the one of largest music markets in the world. However, music is more expensive there than elsewhere, so labels tend to favor adding a few extras in an attempt be competitive with imports, and from a musicians perspective this enticement is made in an attempt to incorporate this market into a broad international fanbase.

In popular culture

A song by MC Lars featuring Ashley Jade entitled "The Bonus Track for Japan" pokes fun at the Japan-specific instance of this phenomenon, with Lars singing a series of facts about Japan. It was actually used as the "Japanese bonus track" for Lars' album The Graduate

See also

Advertisements

In terms of recorded music, a bonus track (also known as a bonus cut or bonus) is a piece of music which has been included on specific releases or reissues of an album. This is most often done as a promotional device, either as an incentive to customers to purchase albums they might otherwise not, or to repurchase albums they already own. In contrast to hidden tracks, bonus tracks are included on track listings.

Many international releases — most commonly Japanese releases of European or American albums, but not confined to just Japan, or just music going from West to East — contain a few bonus tracks. These are often B-sides from singles. Alternate takes are other tracks often released as bonus tracks. It has also been said that this is the industry's way to get consumers to purchase albums from Japanese distributors, instead of sometimes less expensive imports from the West.

It's not uncommon to release singles as bonus tracks on re-issues of old albums, where those weren't originally included.

With the advent of online music stores, such as Apple's iTunes Music Store, à la carte song buying has become the norm. Bonus tracks are often included if a customer buys a whole album rather than just one or two hit songs from the artist. The song is not necessarily free nor is it available as a stand alone download, adding also to the incentive to buy the complete album.

The bonus track as a marketing technique: Japan is the one of largest music markets in the world. However, music is more expensive there than in America or Europe, so Japanese labels often arrange for additional content in the locally printed discs in an attempt to be competitive with imports.

In popular culture

A song by MC Lars featuring Ashley Jade entitled "The Bonus Track for Japan" pokes fun at the Japan-specific instance of this phenomenon, with Lars singing a series of facts about Japan. It was actually used as the "Japanese bonus track" for Lars' album The Graduate.

Synthpop band Hyperbubble added a bonus track named "Bonus Track" at the end of their second album Airbrushed Alibis. The song starts with the sentence "Wait! There's more!" and features lyrics such as "It's on the CD but it only has a number, it makes you feel like you had a better deal. It may not be as good as the others but that's ok because it's just a... bonus track".

See also


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message