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Booker
Genre Crime drama
Created by Eric Blackeney
Stephen J. Cannell
Starring Richard Grieco
Carmen Argenziano
Marcia Strassman
Opening theme "Hot in the City" performed by Billy Idol
Composer(s) Mike Post
Country of origin  United States
Language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 22
Production
Executive producer(s) Bill Nuss
Producer(s) Carleton Eastlake
Brooke Kennedy
Jo Swerling, Jr.
Running time 60 mins. (approx)
Broadcast
Original channel FOX
Original run September 24, 1989 – May 6, 1990
Chronology
Related shows 21 Jump Street

Booker is an American crime drama series starring Richard Grieco that aired on the FOX Network from September 24, 1989 to May 6, 1990. The series was a spin-off of 21 Jump Street. The theme song for the series was "Hot in the City" by Billy Idol.

Contents

Synopsis

Booker was an hour-long television drama starring Richard Grieco that featured now-disgraced former Vancouver police officer/Jump Street Squad member Dennis Booker working within the "Private Investigations" division of a Vancouver-based, Japanese-owned mega-conglomerate. The series also starred Carmen Argenziano, Marcia Strassman, Katie Rich, and Lori Petty. He hated authority and being told what to do, and even went on his own missions to benefit his friends and family, not the government (or the Metro Vancouver police force).

FOX scheduled Booker in 21 Jump Street's lead-in timeslot on Sunday nights at 7/8 p.m. (21 Jump Street moved Mondays).[1] The series was later moved to the 9/10 p.m. Sunday timeslot. FOX then canceled the series after its first season run.[2]

Cast

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Notable guest stars

Episodes

Episode # Episode title Original airdate
1-1 "Booker" September 24, 1989
1-2 "The Pump" October 1, 1989
1-3 "Raising Arrizola" October 8, 1989
1-4 "High Rise" October 22, 1989
1-5 "All You Gotta Do Is Do It" October 29, 1989
1-6 "Bete Noir" November 5, 1989
1-7 "Flat Out" November 12, 1989
1-8 "Deals and Wheels: Part I" November 26, 1989
1-9 "Stole Lucille" December 10, 1989
1-10 "Cementhead" December 17, 1989
1-11 "The Red Dot" January 14, 1990
1-12 "Who Framed Roger Thornton?" January 21, 1990
1-13 "Hacker" February 4, 1990
1-14 "The Life and Death of Chick Sterling" February 11, 1990
1-15 "Black Diamond Run" February 18, 1990
1-16 "Love Life" February 25, 1990
1-17 "Reunion" March 25, 1990
1-18 "Wedding Bell Blues" April 1, 1990
1-19 "Molly and Eddie" April 8, 1990
1-20 "Crazy" April 5, 1990
1-21 "Mobile Home" April 29, 1990
1-22 "Father's Day" May 6, 1990

DVD releases

Region 4

Beyond Home Entertainment released Booker- The Complete Series on DVD in Australia on September 17, 2008, for the very first time. The episode titled "Deals and Wheels pt.1" has been removed as it is part of a crossover with 21 Jump Street. Both episodes are included on the 4th season release of 21 Jump Street.

Region 1

Mill Creek Entertainment released Booker- Collector's Edition on DVD for the very first time on August 25, 2009. [1] Music rights have kept the episodes "Someone Stole Lucille" and "Deal and Wheels Part 1" from appearing on the set, hence the title of the release has been changed. The theme song was also changed to a generic action piece as the rights to the Hot in the City could not be negotiated.

References

  1. ^ Shales, Tom (1989-07-29). "FOX Finds Success By Aiming Low". archive.deseretnews.com. http://archive.deseretnews.com/archive/57447/FOX-FINDS-SUCCESS-BY-AIMING-LOW.html. Retrieved 2009-02-25.  
  2. ^ "Top 10 Worst TV Spin-Offs". time.com. http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1845866_1846026_1846013,00.html. Retrieved 2009-02-25.  
  3. ^ a b Ariano, Tara; Bunting, Sarha (2006). Television Without Pity: 752 Things We Love to Hate (and Hate to Love) about TV. Quirk Books. pp. 280. ISBN 1-594-74117-4.  

External links


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