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Boswellia: Wikis

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Boswellia
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Sapindales
Family: Burseraceae
Genus: Boswellia
Roxb. ex Colebr.
Species

see text

Boswellia is a genus of trees known for their fragrant resin which has many pharmacological uses particularly as anti-inflammatories. The Biblical incense frankincense was probably an extract from the resin of the tree, Boswellia sacra.

There are four main species of Boswellia which produce true frankincense and each type of resin is available in various grades. The grades depend on the time of harvesting, and the resin is hand sorted for quality. Anyone interested in frankincense would be well advised to first obtain a small sample of each type from a reputable dealer in order to ascertain the difference between each resin.

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Medicinal uses

Boswellia has long been used in Ayurvedic medicine. Recently, the boswellic acids that are a component of the resin it produces have shown some promise as a treatment for asthma and various inflammatory conditions [1] In West Africa, the bark of Boswellia dalzielii is used to treat fever, rheumatism and gastrointestinal problems.[2] Boswellia incense may even relieve depression.[3]

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Species

Gallery

Notes

  1. ^ Gupta I, Gupta V, Parihar A, et al. Effects of Boswellia serrata gum resin in patients with bronchial asthma: results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, 6-week clinical study. European Journal of Herbal Medicine 1998; 3:511-14.
  2. ^ Arbonnier 2002. Arbres, arbustes et lianes des zones s├Ęches de l'Afrique de l'Ouest
  3. ^ [1] "Incensole acetate, an incense component, elicits psychoactivity by activating TRPV3 channels in the brain", The FASEB Journal, 20 May, 2008.
  4. ^ a b c d e f "Species in GRIN for genus". www.ars-grin.gov. http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/splist.pl?1604. Retrieved 2009-01-14.  

External links


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