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Bradley Wiggins
Bradley Wiggins at the 2009 Northern Rock Cyclone Beaumont Trophy
Bradley Wiggins at the
2009 Northern Rock Cyclone Beaumont Trophy
Personal information
Full name Bradley Wiggins
Date of birth 28 April 1980 (1980-04-28) (age 29)
Country  England
 United Kingdom
Height 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in)[1]
Weight 71 kg (160 lb; 11.2 st)[1]
Team information
Current team Team Sky
Discipline Road & Track
Role Rider
Rider type All-Rounder
Professional team(s)1
2001
2002–2003
2004–2005
2006–2007
2008
2009
2010–
Linda McCartney Racing Team
Française des Jeux
Crédit Agricole
Cofidis
Team High Road
Garmin-Slipstream
Team Sky
Major wins
Gold medal.svg Olympic Games, Pursuit (2004, 2008)
Arc en ciel.svg World Championship, Pursuit (2003, 2007, 2008)
Arc en ciel.svg World Championship, Madison (2008)
Arc en ciel.svg World Championship, Team Pursuit (2007, 2008)
Dauphiné Libéré, 1 stage (2007)
United Kingdom British National Time Trial Championships (2009)
Infobox last updated on:
10 December 2009

1 Team names given are those prevailing
at time of rider beginning association with that team.

Bradley Marc Wiggins, CBE (born 28 April 1980) is a British professional track and road bicycle racer, currently riding for Team Sky. He won three medals on the track at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics, and two gold medals at the Beijing 2008 Summer Olympics. He came fourth in the 2009 Tour de France.

Contents

Early years and family life

The son of a professional cyclist, Gary Wiggins, Bradley Wiggins was born in Ghent, Belgium and spent his childhood in London with his mother Linda and younger brother, Ryan. He started racing at south London's Herne Hill Velodrome aged 12.[2] He lives in Eccleston, Lancashire. He married Catherine Cockram in Manchester in November 2004. They have two children, Ben and Isabella.[3]

International cycling

At 20, Wiggins won a bronze medal for Britain in the team pursuit at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney.

In 2001 he signed for the British professional road Linda McCartney Racing Team before it disbanded in early 2001.[4] He joined Française des Jeux in 2002, before moving to Crédit Agricole in 2004.

At the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, Wiggins became the first British athlete in 40 years to win three medals at one Games, the last being Mary Rand at the 1964 Olympic Games in Tokyo. He won the gold in the pursuit, silver in the team pursuit, and bronze in the madison with his race partner Rob Hayles. Wiggins was appointed OBE in the 2005 New Year Honours for services to sport.[4]

In 2005, Wiggins rode Giro d'Italia for Crédit Agricole. He moved to Cofidis in 2006, and rode that year's Tour de France. He returned to the track for the Manchester round of the UCI World Cup and the world championships in 2007, winning the individual and team pursuit. He followed on the road by winning the prologue of the Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré.

He raced for Cofidis in the 2007 Tour de France and finished fourth in the prologue in London. He won the combativity award on stage six for a long solo breakaway. Cofidis withdrew after Cristian Moreni failed a doping test.[5]

Wiggins at the 2008 Tour of Britain

2008

In 2008 he signed with Team High Road, a team now known as Team HTC-Columbia. At the 2008 UCI Track Cycling World Championships in Manchester, he won three gold medals: pursuit, team pursuit and madison.

At the 2008 Beijing Olympics he again won the pursuit, the first rider to successfully defend a pursuit title at the Olympics. On 17 August, he was a member of the Olympic pursuit team which broke the world record in the heats with 3:55:202, beating Russia to the ride-off for silver and gold.[6] The following day, the team won the gold with a world record of 3:53:314, beating Denmark by 6.7s.[7] Wiggins paired up with Mark Cavendish in the madison and finished ninth[8].

In October 2008 he published his autobiography, In Pursuit of Glory [9] and joined the Garmin-Slipstream team for the 2009 season.[10]

On 14 December 2008 Wiggins came ninth in the BBC Sports Personality Awards with 5,633 votes.[11] On 31 December Wiggins was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2009 New Year Honours.[12]

2009

Bradley Wiggins at the 2009 Tour de France

After finishing the 2009 Giro d'Italia 71st, which included second place in the final stage, Wiggins arrived at the 2009 Tour de France having lost six kilos.[13][14] He came third in the opening time-trial in Monaco and helped Garmin to second place in the team time-trial despite losing four riders. In the first mountain finish, Wiggins finished 12th, and at 5th place overall entering the second week, had the highest second-week place by a British rider since Robert Millar. On the second mountain finish, in Verbier, Wiggins finished fifth to climb to third overall. He was attacked by the Schleck brothers on stage 17 and dropped to sixth, but moved to fourth in the stage 18 time-trial. On stage 20 to Mont Ventoux, Wiggins finished tenth and held fourth by three seconds ahead of Frank Schleck. He held that position in the final stage, joining Robert Millar as best British rider in Tour.[15].

Wiggins won the British National Time Trial Championships in September 2009.[16]

In October 2009, he won the Herald Sun Tour after helping team-mates most of the race. He led after winning the stage five time-trial in Geelong by 14 seconds over team-mate Svein Tuft.

Wiggins had been contracted to ride for Garmin Slipstream in 2010, but following much speculation it was announced in December 2009 that he was to leave to join Team Sky, having signed a four year contract with the new British based team.[17]

Palmarès

Olympic Games

2000 Summer Olympics
Bronze medal olympic.svg Bronze, team pursuit
2004 Summer Olympics
Gold medal olympic.svg Gold, 4km individual pursuit
Silver medal olympic.svg Silver, team pursuit
Bronze medal olympic.svg Bronze, madison
2008 Summer Olympics
Gold medal olympic.svg Gold, 4km individual pursuit
Gold medal olympic.svg Gold, team pursuit

World Championships

1997 UCI Junior Track Cycling World Championships
Gold medal blank.svg Gold, 2km individual pursuit
2000 UCI Track Cycling World Championships
Silver medal blank.svg Silver, team pursuit
2001 Track Cycling World Championships
Silver medal blank.svg Silver, team pursuit
2002 UCI Track Cycling World Championships
Bronze medal blank.svg Bronze, team pursuit
2003 UCI Track Cycling World Championships
Gold medal blank.svg Gold, 4km individual pursuit
Silver medal blank.svg Silver, team pursuit
2007 UCI Track Cycling World Championships
Gold medal blank.svg Gold, 4km individual pursuit
Gold medal blank.svg Gold, team pursuit
2008 UCI Track Cycling World Championships
Gold medal blank.svg Gold, 4km individual pursuit
Gold medal blank.svg Gold, Team pursuit (world record time)
Gold medal blank.svg Gold, madison

Commonwealth Games

2002 Commonwealth Games
Silver medal blank.svg Silver, 4km individual pursuit
Silver medal blank.svg Silver, team pursuit
1998 Commonwealth Games
Silver medal blank.svg Silver, team pursuit

Professional victories

2003
1st Stage 1 ITT, Tour de l'Avenir
1st Six Days of Ghent
2005
1st Stage 2 ITT, Circuit de Lorraine
1st Stage 8, Tour de l'Avenir
2007
1st Prologue, Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré
1st Stage 1 ITT, Four Days of Dunkirk
1st Stage 4 ITT, Tour du Poitou-Charentes et de la Vienne
1st Duo Normand
Jersey red number.svg Stage 6, combativity award
2009
1st United Kingdom British National Time Trial Championships
1st Overall Herald Sun Tour
1st Stage 5 ITT
1st Stage 1 TTT, Tour of Qatar
1st Stage 3b ITT, Driedaagse De Panne-Koksijde
1st Beaumont Trophy
4th Overall, Tour de France

Grand Tour General Classification results timeline

Grand Tour 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
Giro 134 71
Tour 124 WD 4
Vuelta

WD = withdrew

World records

  • 4000m Team Pursuit, 3:55:202, (as part of Great British team), Beijing China, 2008
  • 4000m Team Pursuit, 3:53:314, (as part of Great British team), Beijing China, 2008

Quotes

  • "Most people were too drunk to notice me." On his experiences of late-night practice runs for the London leg of the Tour de France.[18]
  • "It is nice to be recognised for actually achieving something in life as opposed to spending seven weeks in a house on TV with a load of other muppets." A reference to the television programme, Big Brother, after finishing fourth in the Tour de France prologue.[19]

References

  1. ^ a b "Athlete Biography - WIGGINS Bradley". Beijing Olympics official website. http://results.beijing2008.cn/WRM/ENG/BIO/Athlete/8/225168.shtml.  
  2. ^ "Sport blog: Looking down from Herne Hill, I can see the future is bright". Guardian Unlimited. 8 April 2007. http://blogs.guardian.co.uk/sport/2007/04/08/looking_down_from_herne_hill_i.html.  
  3. ^ Mike Pattenden (2008-08-24). "On the move: Bradley Wiggins". London: The Sunday Times. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/men/article4588225.ece. Retrieved 2009-07-26.  
  4. ^ a b "Wiggins wheels his way to history". BBC SPORT. 31 December 2004. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/front_page/4135289.stm.  
  5. ^ "Wiggins' Cofidis team out of Tour". BBC SPORT. 25 July 2007. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/other_sports/cycling/6916422.stm.  
  6. ^ "GB pursuit team set world record". BBC Sport. 17 August 2008. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/olympics/cycling/7566164.stm.  
  7. ^ "GB storm to gold in team pursuit". BBC Sport. 18 August 2008. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/olympics/cycling/7567845.stm.  
  8. ^ "Official Results". Beijing 2008. 20 July 2009. http://results.beijing2008.cn/WRM/ENG/INF/CT/C73H/CTM409100.shtml#CTM409101.  
  9. ^ "In Pursuit of Glory". Orion Books. http://www.orionbooks.co.uk/HB-43193/In-Pursuit-of-Glory.htm.  
  10. ^ "BRADLEY WIGGINS SET TO JOIN GARMIN-CHIPOTLE". Cycling Weekly. http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/Bradley_Wiggins_set_to_join_GarminChipotle_article_266739.html.  
  11. ^ "Sports Personality – The Full Results". Cycling Weekly. 2008-12-15. http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/Sports_personality_the_full_results_article_273946.html.  
  12. ^ London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 58929, p. 8, 31 December 2008.
  13. ^ "Wiggins stays with leaders in Tour de France". Cycling Weekly. 12 July 2009. http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/latest/382663/wiggins-stays-with-leaders-in-tour-de-france.html.  
  14. ^ "Wiggins Erases the Bitterness of 2007 Tour". New York Times. 15 July 2009. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/16/sports/cycling/16tour.html.  
  15. ^ Robert Millar came fourth in 1984
  16. ^ "Wiggins and Pooley take British TT Champs titles". Cycling Weekly. 2009-09-06. http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/latest/395970/wiggins-and-pooley-take-british-tt-champs-titles.html.  
  17. ^ William Fotheringham (2009-12-10). "Bradley Wiggins joins Team Sky on four-year-deal". The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2009/dec/10/bradley-wiggins-team-sky-transfer.  
  18. ^ "Quotes of the Week". BBC News. 2007-07-17. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/funny_old_game/6900962.stm.  
  19. ^ "Fun and Games:Quotes of the Week". BBC News. 17 July 2007. http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/funny_old_game/6900962.stm.  

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