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Brian Gerard James
Ring name(s) (The) Dark Secret[1][2]
Brian Armstrong[1][2]
(The) Roadie[1][2]
Jesse James[1][2]
Jesse James Armstrong[2][3]
(The) Road Dogg[1][2]
B.G. James[1][2]
Billed height 6 ft 3 in (191 cm)[1][2][4]
Billed weight 240 lb (109 kg)[3][4]
Born May 20, 1969 (1969-05-20) (age 40)[2][5]
Marietta, Georgia[1][2]
Resides Jay, Florida[1]
Billed from Nashville, Tennessee[3]
Marietta, Georgia[4]
Pensacola, Florida
Trained by Bob Armstrong[2][3]
Brad Armstrong[2]
Paul Orndorff[2]
Debut 1992[2][3]

Brian Gerard (B.G.) James[3] (born May 20, 1969)[5] is an American professional wrestler known for his work in Total Nonstop Action Wrestling, but perhaps best known for his appearances with the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) as "The Road Dogg" Jesse James or simply Road Dogg. He is a former member of D-Generation X and the tag team partner of Billy Gunn, with whom he comprised the New Age Outlaws in the WWF and The James Gang and Voodoo Kin Mafia in Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA). In the WWF, James is a one time Intercontinental Champion, a one time Hardcore Champion, and a five time Tag Team Champion with Billy Gunn. In TNA, he is a two time NWA World Tag Team Champion with Konnan and Ron Killings.

Contents

Early career

James served in the United States Marine Corps from 1987 to 1993 and fought in Operation Desert Storm in 1991, where he was a platoon Sergeant in command of thirty-three Marines.[1][2]

Professional wrestling career

World Wrestling Federation (1994–2000)

The Roadie

After wrestling for a whole year in Smoky Mountain Wrestling as The Dark Secret and making occasional appearances for World Championship Wrestling as Brian Armstrong, James began his career with the World Wrestling Federation towards the end of 1994.[6] He was billed as The Roadie, an assistant to "Double J" Jeff Jarrett, a would-be country singer.[6] He wrestled on several pay-per-views and television shows, but most of his first WWF tenure was spent accompanying Jarrett and interfering in his matches. In early 1995, Jarrett released the song "With My Baby Tonight," that Jarrett claimed he had sung himself. The planned angle was to reveal that it was The Roadie, not Jarrett, who had really performed the vocals on this song, sparking a feud between the two wrestlers.[6] Before this revelation could take place, Jarrett and James suddenly left the WWF following the second In Your House pay-per-view on July 23, 1995. James then joined the United States Wrestling Association as Jesse James Armstrong, winning the heavyweight and tag titles before being forced to leave as a result of a loss at the hands of Jarrett.[6]

New Age Outlaws

Road Dogg at the King of the Ring 2000

James returned to the WWF in 1996 as Jesse James, "The Real Double J", and revealed himself to be the true singer of "With My Baby Tonight".[6] He languished as a midcard singles wrestler until he formed a tag team with Billy Gunn, New Age Outlaws.[6] A change in creative direction in the WWF in late 1997 led Gunn, who had formerly been stuck under the tutelage of The Honky Tonk Man in the unpopular gimmick of "Rockabilly", to dye his hair back to its original blond color and assume the name "Badd Ass" Billy Gunn (also known as Mr. Ass), while James became "The Road Dogg" Jesse James and he began to grow his hair out into shoulder-length cornrows. The appearance and mannerisms of the team became more and more controversial and anti-social, with the team becoming known as the New Age Outlaws. The Outlaws feuded with the Road Warriors and the short-lived tag team of Cactus Jack and Chainsaw Charlie (Terry Funk) before joining D-Generation X the night after WrestleMania XIV.[6]

The Outlaws amassed five Tag Team Championship reigns before Gunn was legitimately injured in early 2000 and thrown out of DX to explain his absence. James then teamed with fellow DX member X-Pac throughout the summer of 2000 but failed to regain his former popularity or title success.[6] The team eventually split, and DX fell apart. James then formed a tag team with newcomer K-Kwik.[6] He was suspended in December 2000 and was then released from the WWF on January 26, 2001.[7]

Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (2002–2009)

After making appearances on the independent circuit, most prominently with the short-lived World Wrestling All-Stars (WWA) promotion, James debuted for the Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA) promotion on September 18, 2002 wrestling as B.G. James, as the popular Road Dogg gimmick was owned by WWE. He was initially a villain and one of the founding members of Vince Russo's Sports Entertainment Xtreme faction.[6]

3Live Kru (2003–2005)

In July 2003, James formed the stable known as the 3Live Kru with Hispanic wrestler Konnan and the African American wrestler Ron Killings.[8][9] James was presented as a white trash redneck. The stable was popular from the outset and was notable because they sang their own entrance music as they approached the ring. The 3Live Kru turned out to be a successful gimmick as Killings held the NWA World Heavyweight Championship for a second time and all three members enjoyed Tag Title reigns.[6]

Tension arose when James' former partner Billy Gunn joined TNA as "The New Age Outlaw" (later shortened to "The Outlaw") in February 2005.[10] The Outlaw repeatedly courted James, seeking to split the Kru and recreate the New Age Outlaws. When The Outlaw began feuding with the Kru, James repeatedly found his loyalties divided, unwilling to fight either his former or current tag team partners. For a time, James stopped appearing with the Kru but did not align himself with The Outlaw, who had by then changed his name to "Kip James" as a "tribute" to James' father. At Sacrifice, he reasserted his allegiance with 3LK as the special guest referee in a match between the other members of 3LK and the team of Kip James and Monty Brown.[11] Kip tried to warm up to 3LK again in the lead-up to Bound for Glory by saving James several times from Team Canada. At Bound for Glory, he offered his protective services to them against Team Canada to neutralize Scott D'Amore. When they lost, Kip came down to the ring, appearing ready to hit Konnan with a steel chair since he originally vetoed Kip's offer.[12] Kip instead saved Konnan from Team Canada, thus proving his original intentions.[12]

On the November 26 episode of Impact!, James brought Kip and the 3LK to the ring and asked Killings and Konnan to give Kip a yes/no vote to be accepted into the group.[13] After James got heated with Konnan, both gave Kip yes votes and the 4Live Kru was born.[13] The 4Live Kru was short lived as Konnan, still apparently upset at Kip's induction into the Kru, hit both James and Kip over the head with a steel chair at Turning Point.[14] Konnan, still wanting Killings to be his "family," tried talking with Killings. Killings told Konnan that he was done with the Kru and wanted to leave it all behind him.

The James Gang (2006)

After the incident, James and Kip regrouped, reformed their old tag team as The James Gang, and feuded with Konnan's new stable, The Latin American Xchange (LAX), which he formed with Homicide and Apolo. Apolo was sent home from Against All Odds after complaining about being used as enhancement talent and was quickly replaced by a relative unknown named Machete.

On a subsequent edition of Impact!, James' real life father "Bullet" Bob Armstrong informed The James Gang that he was sick of the shenanigans of LAX and how they always used strength in numbers to their advantage. He informed them that he was going to see Larry Zbyszko to have himself added to the Destination X match as their partner, effectively making it a three-man tag team. A despondent James turned to Kip and comically uttered "Mom is gonna KILL me!". "Bullet" was in fact added to the team and, they won the match at Destination X.[15] The next month an arm wrestling match was booked between Armstrong and Konnan, where the losing team would get hit ten times with a leather whip. Armstrong prevailed with the victory, so LAX was whipped several times upon scrambling out of the cage for survival.

Following rivalry with LAX, James and Kip went after Team 3D.[6] The two teams cut promos arguing over their long term histories with past promotions such as WWE and ECW.[6] The rivalry came to a head at Sacrifice when The James Gang beat Team 3D using a lead pipe.[16] The James Gang and Team 3D feuded throughout the summer. They were scheduled for a number one contendership match at Hard Justice but, due to a fire, the match was canceled. The match was rescheduled for Impact!, which the Gang lost.

On the November 2, 2006 edition of Impact!, Kip and James announced that they were going to quit TNA.[17] While attempting to speak about it, their microphones were cut off.[17] When the show returned, the announcers speculated that they may have been frustrated due to the influx of new talent entering TNA. It was later reported that the segment was a worked shoot that Vince Russo had written in order to renew interest upon their eventual return.[18]

Voodoo Kin Mafia (2006–2008)

On the November 16 airing of Impact!, The James Gang announced that they would now be known as Voodoo Kin Mafia (VKM) (a pun on the name Vincent Kennedy McMahon). They spent their airtime bashing McMahon and both members of D-Generation X, using their real names: Paul Levesque and Michael Hickenbottom. After calling Triple H "Triple Hollywood" and Shawn Michaels "Shawn Kiss-My-Bottom", VKM claimed they were declaring war on DX and Vincent Kennedy McMahon. On the November 23 airing of Impact!, they drove around searching for their targets, but they ended up arriving at a Target store. At the end of the episode, VKM argued, and Kip pointed straight ahead to the WWE World Headquarters, which prompted James to respond, "We're back!". In December 2006, as acknowledged by TNA's website, VKM accepted The Hardys' open challenge to a match at December to Dismember. WWE never acknowledged their acceptance. Over the following weeks, VKM aired several more videos bashing DX and Vince McMahon. They also made a $1,000,000 challenge to DX as announced on the TNA website. They declared 'victory' at Final Resolution, after receiving no answer from WWE.[19] In early 2007, however, James said in a shoot interview along with his tag team partner Kip that he would jump back to WWE if he could get out of his TNA contract and get a WWE offer.[20]

On August 4, James returned to the Boston based Millennium Wrestling Federation's Soul Survivor IV wrestling event and fanfest.[21] James worked for the promotion when it opened in 2001, but no-showed a benefit for "Superstar" Billy Graham in October 2002 due to his "personal demons". MWF has brought the real life situation into the storyline.[22] James and Beau Douglas went on to win the MWF Tag Team Championship from the Canadian Superstars (J-Busta and Dave Cole). During a pre-event question and answer session, James went into his hatred of Jim Ross and his feelings that WWE ruins families and lives. James and Douglas lost the titles back to the Canadians on October 27, 2007 at a Special Olympics fundraiser in Salem, Massachusetts.[23] After five years of bad blood, James made peace with promoter Dan Mirade for sabotaging the Graham benefit and has agreed to return in the future.

At Turning Point, James won one of the cases in the Feast or Fired match, which was later revealed to contain a TNA World Tag Team Championship match.[24] Instead of teaming with Kip, he chose his real life father "Bullet" Bob Armstrong to be his tag team partner. B.G. and Bullet Bob lost their title match against A.J. Styles and Tomko in the opening match of Against All Odds.[25] He and Kip had turned face but on the February 21, 2008 edition of Impact!, Kip turned on James and James' dad "Bullet" Bob Armstrong by hitting them both with a crutch and thus turning heel. At Lockdown, he finally defeated Kip in a six-sides of steel match.[26] Over the next few weeks, James only made brief cameos on Impact!.

Sporadic appearances and departure (2008–2009)

At Final Resolution, James returned to TNA television for the first time in months and participated in the Feast or Fired Match, which was won by Curry Man, Homicide, Hernandez, and Jay Lethal.[27] James was also seen on Impact! two weeks later as he was trying to hold back Jeff Jarrett from fighting Kurt Angle. The week afterwards, he was punched by Angle while he and Jarrett were fighting.[28] On the January 8, 2009 edition of Impact!, James faced off against Angle, but lost the match after Angle applied the ankle lock.[29]

On September 15, 2009, James was released from his TNA contract.[30]

Independent circuit (2009–present)

After leaving TNA, James began to compete on the independent circuit and returned to Jersey All Pro Wrestling for its Halloween Hell event on October 17, where he unsuccessfully competed in a 20-man Jersey City Rumble to determine the number one contender for the Heavyweight Championship.[31] Later on in the event, James acted as a substitute tag team partner for Necro Butcher to successfully defend the Tag Team Championship against the Garden State Gods (Corvis Fear and Myke Quest).[31]

On November 7, James resumed his Road Dogg gimmick for the first time in nearly ten years as he and Mini Gunn defeated the Last Kings of Scotland (Josh Stark and Kyle Cassidy) in a tag team match for the Extreme Wrestling Federation.[31]

Personal life

James is married to Tracy E. Conant. The two were married on September 14, 1996 in Shelby County, Tennessee. Together they have three children: an adopted son called Dustin (born 1991) and two biological daughters called Amber (born 1997) and Hannah (born 2003).[32]

James admits to having had problems with drugs all of his life.[7] In high school, he began smoking marijuana and graduated to pain killers during his time in D-Generation X.[7] After being suspended from the WWF, he went to rehab in an attempt to straighten out his life.[7]

In wrestling

  • Nicknames
    • "The Real Double J"[1]
    • "The Road Dogg" Jesse James[2]
    • "B-Jizzle"[3]
    • "The Trailer Park Gangsta"[3]

Championships and accomplishments

  • Atlantic Coast Championship Wrestling
    • ACCW Heavyweight Championship (1 time)[3]
  • Other titles
    • CCWA Heavyweight Championship (1 time)[3]
    • CWF Heavyweight Championship (1 time)[1]
    • UCW Heavyweight Championship (1 time)[3]

1James defended the title with either Konnan or Killings under the Freebird Rule during their first reign.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "OWOW profile". Online World Of Wrestling. http://www.onlineworldofwrestling.com/profiles/b/bg-james.html. Retrieved 2008-03-01. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Cagematch profile". http://www.cagematch.de/?id=2&nr=760. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "BG James". Bodyslamming.com. http://bodyslamming.com/tna/bgjames.html. Retrieved 2008-03-01. 
  4. ^ a b c "TNA profile". TNA Wrestling. http://www.tnawrestling.com/content/view/272/37/. Retrieved 2008-10-13. 
  5. ^ a b "BG James Profile". Wrestling Digest. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FCO/is_3_3/ai_78264745. Retrieved 2008-03-01. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Milner, John M.. "SLAM! profile". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/Bios/james.html. Retrieved 2009-02-03. 
  7. ^ a b c d Bill Apter (October 2001). "Down a Dark Road: Interview from Wrestling Digest". http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FCO/is_3_3/ai_78264745. Retrieved 2007-05-14. 
  8. ^ Abreu, Donnie (2003-07-10). "TNA: Legend makes an impact, Callis debuts". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/2003/07/10/132081.html. Retrieved 2009-01-31. 
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  10. ^ "2007 Wrestling Almanac & Book of Facts". Wrestling’s Historical Cards (Kappa Publishing): p. 123. 2007. 
  11. ^ LaCroix, Corey David (2005-08-15). "TNA makes a great Sacrifice". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/PPVReports/2005/08/15/1174128.html. Retrieved 2009-01-31. 
  12. ^ a b Kapur, Bob (2005-10-24). "Rhino upsets Jarrett at Bound for Glory". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/PPVReports/2005/10/24/1276228.html. Retrieved 2009-01-31. 
  13. ^ a b Sokol, Chris (2005-11-27). "Impact: A wild time had by all". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/2005/11/27/1326502.html. Retrieved 2009-01-31. 
  14. ^ Kapur, Bob (2005-12-12). "Ups and downs to Turning Point". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/PPVReports/2005/12/12/1349497.html. Retrieved 2009-01-31. 
  15. ^ LaCroix, Corey David (2006-03-13). "Destination X marks a great PPV". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/PPVReports/2006/03/13/1485900.html. Retrieved 2009-02-03. 
  16. ^ Sokol, Chris (2006-05-15). "TNA makes good on Sacrifice PPV". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/PPVReports/2006/05/15/1587120.html. Retrieved 2009-02-03. 
  17. ^ a b Sokol, Chris (2006-11-03). "Impact: Styles claims X Division title". SLAM! SPorts. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/2006/11/03/2220031.html. Retrieved 2009-02-03. 
  18. ^ Daniel Pena (2006-11-04). "TNA Interested In Trish Stratus; TNA Site Hacked, James Gang". Rajah. http://rajah.com/base/node/6675. Retrieved 2006-11-05. 
  19. ^ Sokol, Chris (2007-01-15). "Cage, Angle on top after Final Resolution". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/PPVReports/2007/01/15/3383190.html. Retrieved 2009-01-02. 
  20. ^ "TNA Star To WWE, Konnan's Promos, More". Archived from the original on 2008-01-18. http://web.archive.org/web/20080118112226/http://www.wrestlingexposed.com/headlines/19717.shtml. Retrieved 2007-05-14. 
  21. ^ http://www.http://www.MWFprowrestling.com/mwfevents20070804-SSIV.html
  22. ^ MWFprowrestling.com - MWF Newsline - Bigger Shocker! Road Dogg Returns To The MWF August 4th!
  23. ^ MWFprowrestling.com - MWF ULTRA & Xtra Television Web-Casts & MWF Underground News
  24. ^ Sokol, Chris (2007-12-03). "Chaos rules at Turning Point". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/PPVReports/2007/12/03/4704399.html. Retrieved 2009-02-02. 
  25. ^ Sokol, Chris (2008-02-11). "Against All Odds: Angle still TNA champ". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/PPVReports/2008/02/11/4839768.html. Retrieved 2009-02-02. 
  26. ^ Sokol, Chris (2008-04-13). "TNA Lockdown: Joe captures gold". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/PPVReports/2008/04/13/5275576.html. Retrieved 2009-02-02. 
  27. ^ Sokol, Chris; Sokol, Bryan (2008-12-07). "Final Resolution: The Mafia makes strides". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/PPVReports/2008/12/07/7664991.html. Retrieved 2009-02-03. 
  28. ^ Sokol, Chris (2008-12-26). "Impact: Foley Claus is coming to town". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/2008/12/26/7851216.html. Retrieved 2009-02-03. 
  29. ^ Sokol, Chris (2009-01-09). "Impact: Mafia shatters an ankle before Genesis". SLAM! Sports. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/2009/01/09/7969081.html. Retrieved 2009-02-03. 
  30. ^ Boone, Matt (2009-09-15). "Breaking News: TNA fires Jim Cornette and B.G. James". WrestleZone. http://www.wrestlezone.com/news/article/breaking-news-tna-fires-jim-cornette-bg-james-85613. Retrieved 2009-09-15. 
  31. ^ a b c "Cagematch match listings". http://www.cagematch.de/?id=2&nr=760&view=matches#matches. 
  32. ^ Fansite
  33. ^ a b WWE Summerslam 2000. [DVD]. WWE Video Sony. http://www.amazon.com/WWE-Summerslam-2000-Rock/dp/B00004YRWU. Retrieved 2009-08-06. 
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  40. ^ "NWA Alabama Heavyweight Championship". http://www.wrestling-titles.com/us/al/al-h.html. 
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  45. ^ "WWA World Heavyweight Championship history". http://www.solie.org/titlehistories/whtwwas.html. 
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Notes

External links


Simple English

Brian Gerard James
File:B.G.
Statistics
Ring name(s) B.G. James[1]
Brian Armstrong[1]
(The) Dark Secret[1]
Jesse James[1]
Jesse James Armstrong[2]
(The) Road Dogg[1]
(The) Roadie[1]
Billed height6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)[1][3]
Billed weight240 lb (109 kg)[2][3]
BornMay 20, 1969 (1969-05-20) (age 41)[4]
Marietta, Georgia[1]
ResidesJay, Florida[1]
Billed fromNashville, Tennessee[2]
Marietta, Georgia[3]
Trained byBob Armstrong[2]
Debut1992[2]

Brian Gerard James[2] (born May 20, 1969)[4] is an American pro wrestler known for his work in Total Nonstop Action Wrestling, but perhaps best known for his work with the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) as "The Road Dogg" Jesse James or just Road Dogg. He is a former member of D-Generation X and the tag team partner of Billy Gunn, with whom he made the New Age Outlaws in the WWF and The James Gang and Voodoo Kin Mafia in Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA). In the WWF, James is a one time Intercontinental Champion, a one time Hardcore Champion, and a five time Tag Team Champion with Billy Gunn. In TNA, he is a two time NWA World Tag Team Champion with Konnan and Ron Killings. James is also a one time world heavyweight champion after becoming the first-ever WWA World Heavyweight Champion in 2002.

References








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