The Full Wiki

Brian Teacher: Wikis

  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Brian Teacher
Country  United States
Residence San Diego, California
Date of birth December 23, 1954 (1954-12-23) (age 55)
Place of birth Omaha, Nebraska
Height 6'3 (190 cm)
Weight 175 lbs (79 kg)
Turned pro -
Plays Right-handed
Career prize money US$1,426,514
Singles
Career record 335–235
Career titles 8
Highest ranking 7 (October 19, 1981)
Grand Slam results
Australian Open W (1980)
French Open 3R (1978)
Wimbledon QF (1982)
US Open 4R (1978, 1980)
Doubles
Career record 220–172
Career titles 16
Highest ranking 28 (January 2, 1984)
Last updated on: January 22, 2007.

Brian David Teacher (born December 23, 1954) is a 6' 3" right handed American former professional male tennis player. He reached World # 7 in 1981.

Contents

Tennis career

Teacher learned both tennis and swimming at the age of five, but concentrated solely on tennis after ear and throat troubles caused him to give up swimming.

He won a CIF singles title in 1972 while at Crawford High School.[1]

In 1972, he won the boys' 18 singles and doubles titles.[2] The following year, Teacher enrolled at the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) where he was an All-American from 1973-76, won the Pacific-8 singles and doubles championship in 1974, and was a member of UCLA's NCAA championship teams in 1975-76.

In 1976, just shy of graduating from UCLA with a degree in economics, Teacher turned professional.

In 1977 he won his first singles title, and reached the finals in both the South Australian and New South Wales Opens.

In 1978 at the Seiko World Super Tennis Tournament in Tokyo, Teacher upset UCLA graduates Jimmy Connors and Arthur Ashe before losing in the final to Björn Borg 6–3, 6–4.

Teacher is best remembered for his singles championship at the Australian Open in 1980. He won the final over Kim Warwick of Australia in straight sets (7-5, 7-6, 6-2), becoming the first Jewish male to win a singles title in a Grand Slam event since the 1950s.

He won 8 career singles titles, and 16 doubles titles.

Style of play

He was a terrific player on faster surfaces, where he could use a serve-and-volley attack.

Halls of fame

Teacher was inducted in 2001 into the Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) Hall of Fame.[3], in 2008 into the San Diego Tennis Hall of Fame,[1] and he is also a member of the NCAA Tennis Hall of Fame and the Southern California Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.[2]

Grand Slam singles final

Win (1)

Year Championship Opponent in Final Score in Final
1980 Australian Open Kim Warwick 7–5, 7–6(4), 6–2

Singles finals (23)

Wins (8)

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (1)
Tennis Masters Cup (0)
Grand Prix (7)
Titles by Surface
Hard (2)
Grass (2)
Clay (0)
Carpet (4)
No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in Final Score in Final
1. 1977 Jackson, Mississippi, U.S. Carpet United States Bill Scanlon 6–3, 6–3
2. 1978 Taipei, Taiwan Carpet United States Tom Gorman 6–3, 6–3, 6–3
3. 1979 Newport, Rhode Island, U.S. Grass United States Stan Smith 1–6, 6–3, 6–4
4. 1980 Australian Open, Melbourne Grass Australia Kim Warwick 7–5, 7–6, 6–2
5. 1981 Columbus, Ohio, U.S. Hard United States John Austin 6–3, 6–2
6. 1982 Dortmund WCT, Germany Carpet Poland Wojtek Fibak 6–7, 6–4, 6–4, 2–6, 6–4
7. 1983 Munich WCT, Germany Carpet United States Mark Dickson 1–6, 6–4, 6–2, 6–3
8. 1983 Columbus, Ohio, U.S. Hard United States Bill Scanlon 7–6, 6–4

Runner-ups (15)

No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in Final Score in Final
1. 1976 Newport, Rhode Island, U.S. Grass India Vijay Amritraj 6–3, 4–6, 6–3, 6–1
2. 1977 Adelaide, Australia Grass United States Victor Amaya 6–1, 6–4
3. 1977 Sydney Outdoor, Australia Grass United States Roscoe Tanner 6–3, 3–6, 6–3, 6–7, 6–4
4. 1978 Tokyo Indoor, Japan Carpet Sweden Björn Borg 6–3, 6–4
5. 1980 Los Angeles Hard United States Gene Mayer 6–3, 6–2
6. 1980 Hong Kong Hard Czech Republic Ivan Lendl 5–7, 7–6, 6–3
7. 1980 Taipei, Taiwan Carpet Czech Republic Ivan Lendl 6–7, 6–3, 6–3, 7–6
8. 1980 Bangkok, Thailand Carpet India Vijay Amritraj 6–3, 7–5
9. 1980 Sydney Outdoor, Australia Grass United States Fritz Buehning 6–3, 6–7, 7–6
10. 1981 San Francisco Carpet United States Eliot Teltscher 6–3, 7–6
11. 1982 Maui, Hawaii, U.S. Hard Australia John Fitzgerald 6–2, 6–3
12. 1983 Dallas, Texas, U.S. Hard Ecuador Andrés Gómez 6–7, 6–1, 6–1
13. 1984 Bristol, United Kingdom Grass United States Johan Kriek 6–7, 7–6, 6–4
14. 1984 Gstaad, Switzerland Clay Sweden Joakim Nyström 6–4, 6–2
15. 1985 Livingston, U.S. Hard United States Brad Gilbert 7–6, 6–4

Men's doubles finals (23)

Wins (16)

No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponent in Final Score in Final
1. 1976 Columbus, Ohio, U.S. Hard United States William Brown United States Fred McNair
United States Sherwood Stewart
6–3, 6–4
2. 1978 Manila, Philippines Clay United States Sherwood Stewart Australia Ross Case
Australia Chris Kachel
6–3, 7–6
3. 1980 Washington-2, Washington, D.C. Carpet United States Ferdi Taygan South Africa Kevin Curren
United States Steve Denton
4–6, 6–3, 7–6
4. 1980 Los Angeles Hard United States Butch Walts India Anand Amritraj
United States John Austin
6–2, 6–4
5. 1980 Toronto, Canada Hard United States Bruce Manson Switzerland Heinz Günthardt
United States Sandy Mayer
6–3, 3–6, 6–4
6. 1980 Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S. Hard United States Bruce Manson Poland Wojtek Fibak
Czech Republic Ivan Lendl
6–7, 7–5, 6–4
7. 1980 Taipei, Taiwan Carpet United States Bruce Manson United States John Austin
United States Ferdi Taygan
6–4, 6–0
8. 1980 Bangkok, Thailand Carpet United States Ferdi Taygan Netherlands Tom Okker
United States Dick Stockton
7–6, 7–6
9. 1981 La Quinta, California, U.S. Hard United States Bruce Manson United States Terry Moor
United States Eliot Teltscher
7–6, 6–2
10. 1981 Frankfurt, Germany Carpet United States Butch Walts United States Vitas Gerulaitis
United States John McEnroe
7–5, 6–7, 7–5
11. 1981 Queen's Club Championships, London Grass United States Pat Du Pré South Africa Kevin Curren
United States Steve Denton
3–6, 7–6, 11–9
12. 1981 Columbus, Ohio, U.S. Hard United States Bruce Manson India Anand Amritraj
India Vijay Amritraj
6–1, 6–1
13. 1982 Stuttgart Outdoor, Germany Clay Australia Mark Edmondson Germany Andreas Maurer
Germany Wolfgang Popp
6–3, 6–1
14. 1982 San Francisco Carpet United States Fritz Buehning United States Marty Davis
United States Chris Dunk
6–7, 6–2, 7–5
15. 1983 Columbus, Ohio, U.S. Hard United States Scott Davis India Anand Amritraj
Australia John Fitzgerald
6–1, 4–6, 7–6
16. 1983 Johannesburg, South Africa Hard United States Steve Meister Ecuador Andrés Gómez
United States Sherwood Stewart
6–7, 7–6, 6–2

Runner-ups (7)

No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponent in Final Score in Final
1. 1978 Miami, Florida, U.S. Clay Australia Bob Carmichael United States Tom Gullikson
United States Gene Mayer
7–6, 6–3
2. 1979 Washington Indoor, U.S. Carpet Australia Bob Carmichael United States Robert Lutz
United States Stan Smith
6–4, 7–5, 3–6, 7–6
3. 1979 Stuttgart Indoor, Germany Hard (i) Australia Bob Carmichael Poland Wojtek Fibak
Netherlands Tom Okker
6–3, 5–7, 7–6
4. 1980 Rotterdam, Netherlands Carpet United States Bill Scanlon India Vijay Amritraj
United States Stan Smith
6–4, 6–3
5. 1980 Hong Kong Hard United States Bruce Manson United States Peter Fleming
United States Ferdi Taygan
7–5, 6–2
6. 1982 Los Angeles Hard United States Bruce Manson United States Sherwood Stewart
United States Ferdi Taygan
6–1, 6–7, 6–3
7. 1983 Richmond, Virginia, U.S. Carpet United States Fritz Buehning Czech Republic Pavel Složil
Czech Republic Tomáš Šmíd
6–2, 6–4

Miscellaneous

  • He continued successfully as a coach, working with among others Greg Rusedski, Max Mirnyi, and doubles teams of Knowles/Nestor and Grabb/Reneberg.[4]
  • He has two daughters with wife Lori: Noel and Kelly.
  • The book Superlearning 2000 (update on the 1979 original version) attributes the rise in Teacher's career during 1980 to his experiments with suggestive accelerated learning methods, which were introduced to him by Powell Blankenship, a tennis teacher in San Diego.

References

External links








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message