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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bright's disease is a historical classification of kidney diseases that would be described in modern medicine as acute or chronic nephritis. The term is no longer used, as diseases are now classified according to their more fully understood causes.[1][2][3]

It is typically denoted by the presence of serum albumin (blood plasma protein) in the urine, and frequently accompanied by edema and hypertension.

Contents

Symptoms

These common symptoms of kidney disease were first described in 1827 by noted English physician Richard Bright.[4] It is now known that the symptoms accompany various morbid kidney conditions.[5] Thus, the term Bright's disease is retained strictly for historical application.[6]

The symptoms are usually severe. Back pain, vomiting and fever commonly signal an attack. Oedema, varying in degree from slight puffiness of the face to an accumulation of fluid sufficient to distend the whole body, and sometimes severely restrict breathing, is very common. Urine is reduced in quantity, is of dark, smoky or bloody color, and has higher levels of albumin (albuminuria). Under the microscope, blood corpuscles and urinary casts are found in abundance.

This state of acute inflammation may severely limit normal daily activities, and if left unchecked, may lead to one of the chronic forms of Bright's disease. In many cases though, the inflammation is reduced, marked by increased urine output and the gradual disappearance of its albumen and other abnormal by-products. A reduction in edema and a rapid recovery of strength usually follows.

Treatment

Acute Bright's disease was treated with local depletion, warm baths, diuretics, and laxatives. There was no successful treatment for chronic Bright's disease, though dietary modifications were sometimes suggested.

Well-known victims of Bright's disease

References

  1. ^ Cameron JS (October 1972). "Bright's disease today: the pathogenesis and treatment of glomerulonephritis--I". British medical journal 4 (5832): 87–90 contd. PMID 4562073.  
  2. ^ Cameron JS (October 1972). "Bright's disease today: the pathogenesis and treatment of glomerulonephritis. II". British medical journal 4 (5833): 160–3 contd. PMID 4263317.  
  3. ^ Cameron JS (October 1972). "Bright's disease today: the pathogenesis and treatment of glomerulonephritis. 3". British medical journal 4 (5834): 217–20. PMID 4563134.  
  4. ^ Bright, R (1827-1831). Reports of Medical Cases, Selected with a View of Illustrating the Symptoms and Cure of Diseases by a Reference to Morbid Anatomy, vol. I. London: Longmans.  
  5. ^ Wolf G (2002). "Friedrich Theodor von Frerichs (1819-1885) and Bright's disease". American journal of nephrology 22 (5-6): 596–602. PMID 12381966. http://content.karger.com/produktedb/produkte.asp?typ=fulltext&file=ajn22596.  
  6. ^ Peitzman SJ (1989). "From dropsy to Bright's disease to end-stage renal disease". The Milbank quarterly 67 Suppl 1: 16–32. PMID 2682170.  
  7. ^ Nature Doctors Pioneers in Naturopathic medicine, Kirchfeld and Boyle, NCNM press 2005 p. 215.
  8. ^ Smith, P. David. Ouray - Chief of the Utes. Ridgway, Colorado: Wayfinder Press, 1990.
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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

BRIGHT'S DISEASE, a term in medicine applied to a class of diseases of the kidneys (acute and chronic nephritis) which have as their most prominent symptom the presence of albumen in the urine, and frequently also the coexistence of dropsy.

These associated symptoms in connexion with kidney disease were first described in 1827 by Dr Richard Bright (1789-1858). Since that period it has been established that the symptoms, instead of being, as was formerly supposed, the result of one form of disease of the kidneys, may be dependent on various morbid conditions of those organs (see Kidney Diseases). Hence the term Bright's disease, which is retained in medical nomenclature in honour of Dr Bright, must be understood as having a generic application.

The symptoms are usually of a severe character. Pain in the back, vomiting and febrile disturbance commonly usher in the attack. Dropsy, varying in degree from slight puffiness of the face to an accumulation of fluid sufficient to distend the whole body, and to occasion serious embarrassment to respiration, is a very common accompaniment. The urine is reduced in quantity, is of dark, smoky or bloody colour, and exhibits to chemical reaction the presence of a large amount of albumen, while, under the microscope, blood corpuscles and casts, as above mentioned, are found in abundance.

This state of acute inflammation may by its severity destroy life, or, short of this, may by continuance result in the establishment of one of the chronic forms of Bright's disease. On the other hand an arrest of the inflammatory action frequently occurs, and this is marked by the increased amount of the urine, and the gradual disappearance of its albumen and other abnormal constituents; as also by the subsidence of the dropsy and the rapid recovery of strength.

In the treatment of acute Bright's disease, good results are often obtained from local depletion, from warm baths and from the careful employment of diuretics and purgatives. Chronic Bright's disease is much less amenable to treatment, but by efforts to maintain the strength and improve the quality of the blood by strong nourishment, and at the same time by guarding against the risks of complications, life may often be prolonged in comparative comfort, and even a certain measure of improvement be experienced.


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

Etymology

From Dr Richard Bright.

Noun

Singular
Bright's disease

Plural
uncountable

Bright's disease (uncountable)

  1. (pathology) Any of several diseases of the kidney characterized by inflammation, and the presence of albumin in the urine; nephritis.

Simple English

Bright's disease is a historical classification of kidney diseases that would be known in modern medicine as acute or chronic nephritis. The term is no longer used, as diseases are now classified by their more fully known etiologies.


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