The Full Wiki

More info on British XX Corps

British XX Corps: Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

(Redirected to XX Corps (United Kingdom) article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

XX Corps
Active World War II
Country United Kingdom
Branch British Army
Type Field corps

The XX Corps was an army corps of the British Army that was formed in Palestine in 1917. Following the British failure in the Second Battle of Gaza, the Egyptian Expeditionary Force underwent a major rearrangement with the appointment of General Edmund Allenby as the new Commander-in-Chief. The infantry component of the force was divided into two corps; XX Corps and XXI Corps. The XX Corps was commanded by General Philip Chetwode, formerly the commander of the Desert Column.

The corps initially comprised four infantry divisions:

The XX Corps first saw action in the Beersheba phase of the Third Battle of Gaza on October 31, 1917. The 60th and 74th Divisions captured Turkish outposts west of the town but were not involved in the final assault. Following Beersheba on November 6, the corps made a frontal assault against the Turkish fortifications in the vicinity of Sheria where the 10th, 60th and 74th Divisions succeeded in breaking through. The 10th Division captured the Hareira Redoubt on November 7 and the 60th Division advanced on Huj in support of the Australian Mounted Division's effort to cut off the retreating Turkish army.

During the Battle of Megiddo (1918) the formation was:[1]

References

  1. ^ Perrett, Bryan (1999). Megiddo 1918: the last great cavalry victory. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 1855328275.  
  • Doughty, Robert A. (2005). Pyrrhic Victory: French Strategy and Operation in the Great War. Belknap Press.  

See also

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message