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"Britney's New Look"
South Park episode
Britneysnewlook.PNG
Britney Spears, preparing to shoot herself.
Episode no. Season 12
Episode 2
Written by Trey Parker
Directed by Trey Parker
Production no. 1202
Original airdate March 19, 2008
Season 12 episodes
South Park – Season 12
March 12, 2008 – November 19, 2008
  1. Tonsil Trouble
  2. Britney's New Look
  3. Major Boobage
  4. Canada on Strike
  5. Eek, a Penis!
  6. Over Logging
  7. Super Fun Time
  8. The China Probrem
  9. Breast Cancer Show Ever
  10. Pandemic
  11. Pandemic 2: The Startling
  12. About Last Night...
  13. Elementary School Musical
  14. The Ungroundable

Season 11 Season 13
List of South Park episodes

"Britney's New Look" is the second episode of the twelfth season of the animated series South Park. It was first aired on March 19, 2008.[1] In the episode, Kyle Broflovski and Stan Marsh take pity on Britney Spears after a botched attempt at suicide that removes the upper two-thirds of her head, and try to save her from the cruel cycle of cultural martyrdom.

The episode was written and directed by series co-founder Trey Parker, and was rated TV-MA in the United States.

Contents

Plot summary

After seeing on the news that Britney Spears has been spotted in South Park and a man has been paid $100,000 for a photo of her urinating on a ladybug, Stan, Kyle, Cartman and Butters decide to stage a photograph of her crapping on a squirrel (actually Butters in costume), although Butters feels that they should leave Spears alone. They pass the security at the "Komfort Inn," where she is staying, by claiming to be her children. Spears is elated that her children have come to see her, but once she realizes that they are not actually her kids she falls into deeper depression. Finally overwhelmed by the constant harassment and jokes, she attempts suicide by shooting herself in the head with a shotgun.

Miraculously, though the top two-thirds of her head is missing, Spears survives (in a manner similar to Mike). Guilt-ridden, Kyle and Stan visit her in hospital to apologize, telling themselves that they should have left her alone. When one of the paparazzi breaks through the window, Spears' manager sneaks her and the boys out the back into his car but the paparazzi chases them. They escape to her recording studio, where she is made to record a comeback song, although Stan and Kyle insist that this will only make matters worse. She later performs at the MTV Video Music Awards, where the crowd nitpicks her "flaws."

The boys decide they need to help Britney and devise a plan to take her to the North Pole by train to escape from it all. Kyle diverts the paparazzi and eventually confronts them for abusing her, pointing out that she is no longer in any condition to handle it. To Kyle's horror, they explain that she "has to die." A narrator announces Stan's mission to bring Britney to the North Pole. The train engineer notices Spears on his train and stops at a village site where the paparazzi, villagers, and Kyle are waiting. The villagers explain to the boys that ritual human sacrifice is needed for a good corn harvest; however, in modern, more civilized times, people prefer to drive their sacrifices to suicide rather than stoning them to death. The crowd overwhelms Spears and proceeds to somehow photograph her to death, leaving Stan and Kyle in shock.

Months later, South Park residents comment on the good corn harvest while at the supermarket. A newsflash appears on TV, informing the townspeople that Miley Cyrus (star of Hannah Montana) is quickly becoming a major superstar. The townsfolk of South Park see her as their next target. Stan and Kyle reluctantly go along with them, having given up all hopes of reasoning with them.

Cultural references

Stone and Parker indicate that the episode was based on placing Britney Spears in the Shirley Jackson short-story "The Lottery". [2]

Reception

Travis Fickett of IGN found the episode disappointing and gave it a review score of 6.0 out of 10.0. Fickett described the episode as being like "someone attempting to do South Park, and failing".[3]

References

External links

Preceded by
Tonsil Trouble
South Park episodes Followed by
Major Boobage
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