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Brother Bear

Promotional poster
Directed by Aaron Blaise
Robert Walker
Produced by Igor Khait
Chuck Williams
Written by Tab Murphy
Lorne Cameron
David Hoselton
Steve Bencich
Ron J. Friedman
Starring Joaquin Phoenix
Jeremy Suarez
Rick Moranis
Dave Thomas
Jason Raize
D.B. Sweeney
Joan Copeland
Michael Clarke Duncan
Music by Phil Collins
Mark Mancina
Distributed by Walt Disney Pictures
Release date(s) November 1, 2003 (2003-11-01)
Running time 85 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Gross revenue $250,397,798
Followed by Brother Bear 2

Brother Bear is a 2003 American animated film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures, the 44th animated feature in the Walt Disney Animated Classics. In the film, an Inuit boy pursues a bear in revenge for a battle that he provoked in which his oldest brother is killed. He tracks down the bear and kills it, but the Spirits, angered by this needless death, change the boy into a bear himself as punishment. Originally titled Bears, it was the third and final Disney animated feature produced primarily by the Feature Animation studio at Disney-MGM Studios in Orlando, Florida; the studio was shut down in March 2004, not long after the release of this film in favor of computer animated features.[1] The film received an Academy Award nomination for Best Animated Feature, but lost against Finding Nemo. A sequel, Brother Bear 2 was released on August 29, 2006.[2]

Contents

Plot

The film is set in a post-ice age North America, where the local tribesmen believe all creatures are created through the Spirits, who are said to appear in the form of an aurora. Three brothers, Kenai, Denahi and Sitka, return to their tribe in order for Kenahi to receive his sacred totem, its meaning being what he must achieve to call himself a man. Unlike Sitka, who gained the eagle of guidance, and Denahi who gained the wolf of wisdom, Kenai receives the bear of love, much to his objections, stating that bears are thieves. His point is made a fact when a bear steals some salmon. Kenai and his brothers pursue the bear, but a fight follows on an glacier, Sitka giving him life to save his brothers, although the bear survives. Vengeful, Kenai heads out to avenge Sitka. He chases the bear up onto a mountain and kills it, unaware that the mountain is where the Spirits make contact with the Earth. The Spirits, represented by Sitka's spirit in the form of a bald eagle, transforms Kenai into a bear. Denahi arrives, mistaking Kenai for dead, and his bear form is responsible for it, vows to avenge Kenai.

Kenai falls down some river rapids, survives, and is healed by Tanana, the shaman of Kenai's tribe. She does not speak the bear language, but advises him to return to the mountain to find Sikta and be turned back to normal. Kenai quickly discovers the wildlife can talk, meeting two brother mooses, Rutt and Took. He gets caught in a trap, but is freed by a chatty bear cub named Koda. The two bears make a deal, Kenai will go with Koda to a nearby salmon run and then the cub will lead Kenai to the mountain. The two eventually form a sibling-like bond, Koda revealing his mother is missing. The two are hunted by Denahi who fails multiple times to kill Kenai, still unaware that he is his brother. Rutt and Took run into the bears multiple times, the group hitching a ride on a herd of mammoths to quicken the pace to the salmon run, but the moose are left behind when the bears move on. Kenai and Koda escape Denahi again, and reach the salmon run, where a large number of bears live as a family, including the leader Tug, a black bear. Kenai becomes very much at home and at content with the other bears. During a discussion among the bears, Koda tells a story about his mother fighting human hunters, making Kenai realise he killed Koda's mother.

Kenai's contentment is about to be shattered when Koda tells the story of his separation from his mother

Guilty and horrified, Kenai runs away but Koda soon finds him. Kenai subtly reveals the truth to Koda, who runs away grief-stricken. An apologetic Kenai leaves to reach the mountain. Rutt and Took, having fallen out, reform their brotherhood in front of Koda, prompting him to go after Kenai. Denahi confronts Kenai on the mountain, but their fight is intervened by Koda who steals Denahi's hunting pike. Kenai goes to Koda's aid out of love, prompting Sitka to appear and turn him back into a human, much to Denahi and Koda's surprise. However, Kenai asks Sitka to transform him back into a bear so he can look after Koda. Sitka complies, and Koda is reunited briefly with the spirit of his mother, before she and Sitka return to the Spirits. In the end, Kenai lives with the rest of the bears and gains his title as a man, through being a bear.

Cast

Production

In 2002 Digital Media Effects reported the title of the film as Bears.[3] An article in IGN in 2001 also mentioned an upcoming Disney release with the title Bears[4] as did Jim Hill of Ain’t It Cool News.[5]

The film is traditionally animated but includes some CG elements such as “a salmon run and a caribou stampede”.[6] Layout artist Armand Serrano, speaking about the drawing process on the film, said that “we had to do a life drawing session with live bear cubs and also outdoor drawing and painting sessions at Fort Wilderness in Florida three times a week for two months [...]”.[7]

According to Ruben Aquino, supervising animator for the character of Denahi, Denahi was originally meant to be Kenai's father; later this was changed to Kenai's brother.[8] Byron Howard, supervising animator for Kenai in bear form, said that earlier in production a bear named Grizz (who resembles Tug in the film and is even voiced by the same person) was supposed to have the role of Kenai's mentor.[9] Art Director Robh Ruppel stated that the ending of the film originally showed how Kenai and Denahi get together once a year to play when the northern lights are in the sky.[9]

Wil Wheaton is listed by many sources, previously including the Internet Movie Database as providing "additional voices" for the film. Willie Wheaton, the credited voice actor, is a different person.

Reception

The reaction from film reviewers was mixed with many panning the film as a retread of older Disney films like The Lion King and the 20th Century Fox film Ice Age (although Brother Bear began production before Ice Age did), while others defended the film as a legitimate variation of the theme. The popular American movie critics Roger Ebert and Richard Roeper have given positive reviews of the film.[10]

The American reaction to the film revealed a sharp difference of opinion between Christian fundamentalists and the rest of society. The fundamentalist reviewers attacked the film as immoral for presenting a story world of divine spirits and promoting the idea of the fundamental spiritual equality of humanity and animals which was at odds with the Bible. On the other hand, The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops praised the film as extolling a philosophy similar to St. Francis of Assisi. In addition, secular critics who liked the film praised its story as a very moral work with messages about forgiveness, empathy, and brotherhood.

Of note to many critics and viewers was the use of the film's aspect ratio as a storytelling device. The film begins at a standard widescreen aspect ratio of 1.75:1 (similar to the 1.85:1 ratio common in U.S. cinema or the 1.78:1 ratio of HDTV), while Kenai is a human; in addition, the film's art direction and color scheme are grounded in realism. After Kenai transforms into a bear twenty-four minutes into the picture, the film itself transforms as well: to an anamorphic aspect ratio of 2.35:1 and towards brighter, more fanciful colors and slightly more caricatured art direction. Brother Bear was the first feature since The Horse Whisperer to do a widescreen shift. It was the only animated feature to do this trick, until The Simpsons Movie and Enchanted in 2007.

The film made $85,336,277 during its domestic theatrical run and then went on to earn $164,700,000 outside the U.S., bringing its worldwide total to $250,383,219, which is successful. In addition, its March 30, 2004 DVD release brought in more than $167 million in DVD and VHS sales and rentals.[11] In April 2004 alone, 5.51 million copies of Brother Bear were sold.[1]

Soundtrack

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Brother Bear (2003) - News". IMDb. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0328880/news. 
  2. ^ "Brother Bear 2 (2006) (V) - Release dates". IMDb. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0465925/releaseinfo. 
  3. ^ Tracy, Joe. "A Look at Animated Movies Coming Out in 2003". Digital Media FX. http://www.digitalmediafx.com/Features/2003animatedmovies.html. Retrieved 2009-08-07. 
  4. ^ Linder, Brian (2001-07-06). "A Sneak Peek at Disney's Future Films". IGN Entertainment, Inc.. http://movies.ign.com/articles/301/301167p1.html. Retrieved 2009-06-03. 
  5. ^ Hill, Jim (2001-10-11). "New Pics!!! Jim Hill Schools Us About All Things NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS & Long Term Changes At DISNEYLAND!!!". Ain't It Cool News. Harry Knowles. http://www.aintitcool.com/display.cgi?id=10467. Retrieved 2009-08-15. 
  6. ^ Wloszczyna, Susan (October 29, 2003). "Looks like a bear market for 2-D animation". USA Today. http://www.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2003-10-28-2d-animation_x.htm. Retrieved 2009-01-01. 
  7. ^ Milicevic, Pavle. "An interview with Armand Serrano". The Render Node Magazine. http://www.rendernode.com/articles.php?articleId=134. Retrieved 2009-01-04. 
  8. ^ "Das Interview mit Ruben Aquino, Supervising-Animator (English transcript)". OutNow.CH. February 5, 2007. http://outnow.ch/Specials/2004/BrotherBear/Interview.E/. Retrieved 2009-01-03. 
  9. ^ a b (DVD) Brother Bear: Bonus Features: Art Review. Buena Vista Home Entertainment. 2004. 
  10. ^ "Animated News » Brother Bear Two Thumbs Up!". http://www.animated-news.com/2003/brother-bear-two-thumbs-up/. 
  11. ^ "The Year on DVD and Tape". Washingtonpost.com. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A26716-2005Jan21.html. 

External links

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Brother Bear
File:Brother Bear
Promotional poster
Directed by Aaron Blaise
Robert Walker
Produced by Igor Khait
Chuck Williams
Written by Tab Murphy
Lorne Cameron
David Hoselton
Steve Bencich
Ron J. Friedman
Starring Joaquin Phoenix
Jeremy Suarez
Rick Moranis
Dave Thomas
Jason Raize
D.B. Sweeney
Music by Phil Collins
Mark Mancina
Studio Walt Disney Feature Animation
Distributed by Walt Disney Pictures
Buena Vista Distribution
Release date(s) November 1, 2003 (2003-11-01)
Running time 85 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Gross revenue $250,397,798
Followed by Brother Bear 2

Brother Bear is a 2003 animated film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures, the forty-fourth animated feature in the Walt Disney Animated Classics. In the film, an Inuit boy pursues a bear in revenge for a battle that he provoked in which his oldest brother is killed. He tracks down the bear and kills it, but the Spirits, angered by this needless death, change the boy into a bear himself as punishment. Originally titled Bears, it was the third and final Disney animated feature produced primarily by the Feature Animation studio at Disney-MGM Studios in Orlando, Florida; the studio was shut down in March 2004, not long after the release of this film in favor of computer animated features. The film received an Academy Award nomination for Best Animated Feature, but lost against Finding Nemo. A sequel, Brother Bear 2 was released on August 29, 2006.

Contents

Plot

The film is set in a post-ice age North America, where the local tribesmen believe all creatures are created through the Spirits, who are said to appear in the form of an aurora. Three brothers, Kenai (voiced by Joaquin Phoenix), Denahi (voiced by Jason Raize) and Sitka (voiced by D.B. Sweeney), return to their tribe in order for Kenai to receive his sacred totem, its meaning being what he must achieve to call himself a man. Unlike Sitka, who gained the eagle of guidance, and Denahi who gained the wolf wisdom, Kenai receives the bear of love, much to his objections, stating that bears are thieves. His point is made a fact when a bear steals some salmon. Kenai and his brothers pursue the bear, but a fight follows on an glacier, Sitka giving his life to save his brothers, although the bear survives. Vengeful, Kenai heads out to avenge Sitka. He chases the bear up onto a mountain and kills it, unaware that the mountain is where the Spirits make contact with the Earth. The Spirits, represented by Sitka's spirit in the form of a bald eagle transforms Kenai into a bear after the dead bear's body disappears. Denahi arrives, mistaking Kenai for dead, and his bear form is responsible for it, vows to avenge Kenai.

Kenai falls down some river rapids, survives, and is healed by Tanana (voiced by Joan Copeland), the shaman of Kenai's tribe. She does not speak the bear language, but advises him to return to the mountain to find Sikta and be turned back to normal. Kenai quickly discovers the wildlife can talk, meeting two brother mooses, Rutt and Tuke (voiced by Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas). He gets caught in a trap, but is freed by a chatty bear cub named Koda (voiced by Jeremy Suarez). The two bears make a deal, Kenai will go with Koda to a nearby salmon run and then the cub will lead Kenai to the mountain. The two eventually form a sibling-like bond, Koda revealing his mother is missing. The two are hunted by Denahi who fails multiple times to kill Kenai, still unaware that he is his brother. Rutt and Tuke run into the bears multiple times, the group hitching a ride on a herd of mammoths to quicken the pace to the salmon run, but the moose are left behind when the bears move on. Kenai and Koda escape Denahi again, and reach the salmon run, where a large number of bears live as a family, including the leader Tug (voiced by Michael Clarke Duncan), a Grizzly Bear. Kenai becomes very much at home and at content with the other bears. During a discussion among the bears, Koda tells a story about his mother fighting human hunters, making Kenai realize he killed Koda's mother.

File:Brother Bear
Kenai's contentment is about to be shattered when Koda tells the story of his separation from his mother

Guilty and horrified, Kenai runs away but Koda soon finds him. Kenai subtly reveals the truth to Koda, who runs away grief-stricken. An apologetic Kenai leaves to reach the mountain. Rutt and Took, having fallen out, reform their brotherhood in front of Koda, prompting him to go after Kenai. Denahi confronts Kenai on the mountain, but their fight is intervened by Koda who steals Denahi's hunting pike. Kenai goes to Koda's aid out of love, prompting Sitka to appear and turn him back into a human, much to Denahi and Koda's surprise. However, Kenai asks Sitka to transform him back into a bear so he can look after Koda. Sitka complies, and Koda is reunited briefly with the spirit of his mother, before she and Sitka return to the Spirits. In the end, Kenai lives with the rest of the bears and gains his title as a man, through being a bear.

Cast

Additional Voices by Pamela Adlon, Bob Bergen, Rodger Bumpass, Randy Crenshaw, Jennifer Darling, Debi Derryberry, Bill Farmer, Sherry Lynn, Mickie McGowan, Tim Mertens, Patrick Pinney, Brian Posehn, Philip Proctor, Oren Waters, Maxine Waters-Willard, and Wil Wheaton

Production

In 2002 Digital Media Effects reported the title of the film as Bears.[1] An article in IGN in 2001 also mentioned an upcoming Disney release with the title Bears[2] as did Jim Hill of Ain't It Cool News.[3]

The film is traditionally animated but includes some CG elements such as "a salmon run and a caribou stampede".[4] Layout artist Armand Serrano, speaking about the drawing process on the film, said that "we had to do a life drawing session with live bear cubs and also outdoor drawing and painting sessions at Fort Wilderness in Florida three times a week for two months [...]".[citation needed]

According to Ruben Aquino, supervising animator for the character of Denahi, Denahi was originally meant to be Kenai's father; later this was changed to Kenai's brother.[5] Byron Howard, supervising animator for Kenai in bear form, said that earlier in production a bear named Grizz (who resembles Tug in the film and is even voiced by the same person) was supposed to have the role of Kenai's mentor.[6] Art Director Robh Ruppel stated that the ending of the film originally showed how Kenai and Denahi get together once a year to play when the northern lights are in the sky.[6]

Wil Wheaton is listed by many sources, previously including the Internet Movie Database as providing "additional voices" for the film. Willie Wheaton, the credited voice actor, is a different person.

Reception

The reaction from film reviewers was mixed with many panning the film as a retread of older Disney films like The Lion King and the 20th Century Fox film Ice Age (although Brother Bear began production before Ice Age did), while others defended the film as a legitimate variation of the theme. The popular American movie critics Roger Ebert and Richard Roeper have given positive reviews of the film.[7]

The American reaction to the film revealed a sharp difference of opinion between Christian fundamentalists and the rest of society. The fundamentalist reviewers[citation needed] attacked the film as immoral for presenting a story world of divine spirits and promoting the idea of the fundamental spiritual equality of humanity and animals which was at odds with the Bible. On the other hand, The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops praised the film as extolling a philosophy similar to St. Francis of Assisi. USA Today praised its story as moral with messages about forgiveness, empathy, and brotherhood.

Of note to many critics and viewers was the use of the film's aspect ratio as a storytelling device. The film begins at a standard widescreen aspect ratio of 1.75:1 (similar to the 1.85:1 ratio common in U.S. cinema or the 1.78:1 ratio of HDTV), while Kenai is a human; in addition, the film's art direction and color scheme are grounded in realism. After Kenai transforms into a bear twenty-four minutes into the picture, the film itself transforms as well: to an anamorphic aspect ratio of 2.35:1 and towards brighter, more fanciful colors and slightly more caricatured art direction. Brother Bear was the first feature since The Horse Whisperer to do a widescreen shift. It was the only animated feature to do this trick, until The Simpsons Movie and Enchanted in 2007.

The film made $85,336,277 during its domestic theatrical run and then went on to earn $164,700,000 outside the U.S., bringing its worldwide total to $250,383,219, which is successful. In addition, its March 30, 2004 DVD release brought in more than $167 million in DVD and VHS sales and rentals.[8] In April 2004 alone, 5.51 million copies of Brother Bear were sold.[9]

Soundtrack

See also

References

  1. ^ Tracy, Joe. "A Look at Animated Movies Coming Out in 2003". Digital Media FX. http://www.digitalmediafx.com/Features/2003animatedmovies.html. Retrieved August 7, 2009. 
  2. ^ Linder, Brian (July 6, 2001). "A Sneak Peek at Disney's Future Films". IGN. http://movies.ign.com/articles/301/301167p1.html. Retrieved June 3, 2009. 
  3. ^ Hill, Jim (October 11, 2001). "New Pics!!! Jim Hill Schools Us About All Things Nightmare Before Christmas & Long Term Changes At DisneyLand!!!". Ain't It Cool News. Harry Knowles. http://www.aintitcool.com/display.cgi?id=10467. Retrieved August 15, 2009. 
  4. ^ Wloszczyna, Susan (October 29, 2003). "Looks like a bear market for 2-D animation". USA Today. http://www.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2003-10-28-2d-animation_x.htm. Retrieved January 1, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Das Interview mit Ruben Aquino, Supervising-Animator (English transcript)". OutNow.CH. February 5, 2007. http://outnow.ch/Specials/2004/BrotherBear/Interview.E/. Retrieved January 3, 2009. 
  6. ^ a b (DVD) Brother Bear: Bonus Features: Art Review. Buena Vista Home Entertainment. 2004. 
  7. ^ "Animated News » Brother Bear Two Thumbs Up!". Animated Views. October 28, 2003. http://animatedviews.com/2003/brother-bear-two-thumbs-up/. Retrieved July 16, 2010. 
  8. ^ Chaney, Jen (January 23, 2005). "The Year on DVD and Tape". Washingtonpost.com. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A26716-2005Jan21.html. Retrieved April 27, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Brother Bear (2003) - News". IMDb. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0328880/news. Retrieved July 16, 2010. 

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Brother Bear is a 2003 animated film from Walt Disney Pictures.

Contents

Kenai

  • [scoffs] Spirits. Thanks for your wisdom.
  • [first lines] Get down!
  • Sitka?
  • A man wouldn't just sit here and do nothing!
  • [silently] He needs me.
  • But... [sighs] Denahi...
  • The bear of love?
  • Who wants to trade?
  • Never try to milk a caribou.
  • AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!
  • Koda...I did something very wrong.
  • Your mother's not coming.
  • I'm not a beaver, I'm a huma-, no, I mean I'm not a animal, I'm a MAN!
  • Keep all that cuddly human stuff to a minimum, okay, kid?
  • H-hey! You! You just talked!
  • Oh, really?
  • Uhh! Enough with the stories! I don't care about-about the time you and Binky found, you know, the world's biggest pine cone ever!
  • I'm so sorry.
  • No, bear, No! [a bear his jumped and licked his face with Kenai] Stop that right now at licking his face, Please, Come on, you don't, Stop! Get off [Kenai's hand with face wishing].

Denahi

  • No matter what you choose, you'll always be my little brother. Ha, ha. [When Kenai transforms into a human] Did I say "little"?
  • I don't blame the bear, Kenai!

Rutt

  • My name's Rutt. This is my brother, Tuke.
  • I love dew too, eh.
  • He looking for a bear.
  • A bear licking his face with Kenai. Come on, Tuke.

Tuke

  • How's it going, bear?
  • Because I love... dew.
  • Yes, Rutt, There's no problem.

Tanana

  • There is no trading!

Tug

  • Hey, don't throw your fish bones over there! Someone could choke on that...

Dialogue

Kenai: Yeah, I'll probably get, like, a sabretooth tiger for bravery, or strength, or greatness, you know, something that fits me...
Denahi: How about a mammoth for your fat head? Just make sure you get that basket tied up.
Kenai: Don't worry! No stupid bear's gonna get anywhere near this fish!
Denahi: Just tie it up.

Kenai: Yeah... I guess the spirits messed up on both of our totems.
Sitka: You know, I felt the same way when Tanana gave me mine.
Kenai: Get out of here.
Sitka: No, really. I said, The eagle of guidance? What does that mean?... But now that I'm older, I know it's about being a leader... and keeping an eye on you two.
Kenai: ...I just want to get my hand print on that wall.
Sitka: Just be patient, Kenai. When you live by your totem... you will.
Kenai: Really?
Sitka: Guarantee it.

Kenai: Hey, I've got a mountain to get to. Come on, kid.
Koda: I told you before. My name's Koda. Say it with me... Ko-da.
Kenai: (sarcastically) Are you sure your mom didn't ditch you, Ko-da?

Kenai: Koda, there's... something I ought to... you know that story you told me last night?
Koda: Yeah.
Kenai: Well, I have a story to tell you.
Koda: Really? What's it about?
Kenai: Well, it's kind of about a man... and kind of about a bear. But mostly, it's about a monster.

Koda: Mom says the spirits make all the magical changes in the world, like how the leaves change color, or how the moon changes shape, or tadpoles change into frogs...
Kenai: Yeah, I get it. You know, for a change, maybe they could just leave things alone.
Koda: What do you mean?
Kenai: My brother's a spirit, and if it wasn't for him, I... I wouldn't be here.
Koda: You have a brother up there? What happened to him?
Kenai: He was killed by a bea... by a monster.
Koda: What's your brother's name?
Kenai: Sitka.
Koda: Thanks, Sitka. If it weren't for you, I would have never met Kenai. (lays down and snuggles into the mammoth's tusks) I always wanted a brother.

Tanana: (looking over Kenai's body after his transformation) Hmm, strange. The spirits don't usually make these kind of changes! Oh, hmmm... (looking into his eyes) Oh, my, my, my my... Sitka must have something really big planned for you, yup, yup, yup. You're gonna get a whole new perspective on things! Oh, do you see in black and white, or color?

Kenai: Enough with the stories. I don't care about the time you and Binky found the world's biggest pine cone ever.
Koda: First of all, his name's Bucky, not Binky. And second, it wasn't a pine cone, it was a pine nut, and it was huge, even bigger than your fat head!

Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

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Brother Bear
Box artwork for Brother Bear.
Developer(s)
KnowWonder
Publisher(s) Disney Interactive
Release date(s)
Windows
Game Boy Advance
Genre(s) Action-adventure
System(s) Windows, Game Boy Advance
Rating(s)
ESRB: Everyone
System requirements (help)
System RAM

128MiB

DirectX version
Version 9.0b

Brother Bear is a Disney game targeted at 6 to 10 year olds, the goal being to control Kenai, the hunter who has been transformed into a bear, through the levels whilst Rutt and Tuke (the moose) tell the story. The plot is similar to the film and so you are journeying to the mountain where the light touches the earth.

While on this journey, Kenai is constantly being followed by his brother, Denahi, who believes that Kenai actually killed him in his human form, whereas he was just transformed into a bear after he killed Koda's mother (he didn't know at the time) by his older brother who was already dead, Sidga.

During the game there are certain levels where you have to roar at Denahi to knock him out until his health is empty. You won't have killed him, just knocked him out. There are also minigames such as sliding down mountains, and having races to catch the most fish.

Table of Contents

  • Controls
Walkthrough
Appendices

Simple English

Brother Bear
Directed by Aaron Blaise
Robert Walker
Produced by Igor Khait
Chuck Williams
Written by Lorne Cameron
David Hoselton
Tab Murphy
Steve Bencich (screenplay)
Broose Johnson (story)
Jeffrey Stepakoff (additional writer, story)
Starring Joaquin Phoenix
Jeremy Suarez
Rick Moranis
Dave Thomas
Jason Raize
D.B. Sweeney
Joan Copeland
Michael Clarke Duncan
Music by Phil Collins
Mark Mancina
Distributed by Walt Disney Pictures
Release date(s) November 1, 2003
Running time 85 minutes
Language English
Gross revenue $250,397,277
Followed by Brother Bear 2 (2006)
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Brother Bear is a 2003 Academy Award nominated traditionally-animated movie produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures on November 1, 2003. It is about a human named Kenai who turns into a bear and discovers brotherhood. The 43rd animated feature in the Disney animated features canon, it was originally titled Bears, and was the third and final Disney animated movie produced mainly by the Feature Animation studio at Disney-MGM Studios in Orlando, Florida, that studio was shut down in March 2004, not long after the release of this movie in favor of computer animated features.[1] The movie received an Academy Award nomination for Best Animated Feature, but lost against Finding Nemo. A sequel, Brother Bear 2 was released on August 29, 2006.

Contents

The Story

Long ago, as the Earth was emerging from the Ice Age, there were three brothers. After a bear takes the life of Sitka, the oldest brother, the impulsive youngest brother Kenai kills the bear in revenge, only to be changed into a bear himself by the Great Spirits. Denahi, the middle brother, comes upon this bear and, thinking it killed Kenai, vows revenge. Now, with brother hunting brother, Kenai's only hope to change back is to find the place where the lights touch the Earth. Along the way he meets a grizzly cub named Koda, who is also going there. So the adventure ensues and in the end, Kenai (with the help of Koda) discovers the true meaning of brotherhood.

Reception

The reaction from movie reviewers was mixed with many panning the movie as coping older Disney movies like The Lion King and the 20th Century Fox movie Ice Age (although Brother Bear began production before Ice Age did), while others defended the movie as a different and resonable variation of the theme. The popular American movie critics Roger Ebert and Richard Roeper have given positive reviews of the movie.[2]

Cast

  • Joaquin Phoenix as Kenai, the youngest of three brothers who gets turned into a bear, to teach him to see through their eyes
  • Jeremy Suarez as Koda, a wisecracking grizzly bear cub, who helps Kenai on his journey to where the Lights Touch the Earth
  • Rick Moranis as Rutt, a comic Canadian moose
  • Dave Thomas as Tuke, another comic Canadian moose
  • Jason Raize as Denahi, the middle brother
  • D.B. Sweeney as Sitka, the oldest brother
  • Joan Copeland as Tanana, the shaman-woman of Kenai's tribe
  • Michael Clarke Duncan as Tug, a wise old cave bear

Crew

Crew Position
Directed by Aaron Blaise
Robert Walker
Produced by Chuck Williams
Written by Tab Murphy
Lorne Cameron
David Hoselton
Steve Bencich
Ron J. Friedman
Songs by Phil Collins
Original Score by Mark Mancina
Phil Collins
Associate Producer Igor Khait
Art Director Robh Ruppel
Film Editor Tim Mertens
Artistic Supervisors Steve Anderson (Story supervisor)
Jeff Dickson (Layout supervisor)
Barry R. Kooser (Background supervisor)
Phillip S. Boyd & Chrisine Lawrence-Finney (Clean-up supervisor)
Garrett Wren (Effects supervisor)
Supervising Animators Byron Howard (Kenai-Bear)
Alex Kuperschmidt (Koda)
Ruben A. Aquino (Denahi)
James Young Jackson (Kenai-Human)
Tony Stanley (Rutt)
Broose Johnson (Tuke)
Anthony Wayne Michaels (Sitka)
Tom Gately (Tanana)
Rune Brandt Bennicke (Tug & Koda's Mom)
Background Stylist
Character Design
Artistic Coordinator
Production Manager
Xiangyuan Jie
Rune Brandt Bennicke
Kirk Bodyfelt
Bruce Anderson

Songs

Song Performed by Available on the soundtrack disc? Heard in the film?
Great Spirits Tina Turner Yes Yes
Transformation Phil Collins Yes No
Transformation Bulgarian Women's Choir Yes Yes
On My Way Phil Collins Yes Yes (except Koda sings the first few lyrics and the last lyric)
On My Way (this version contains Koda singing the first few lyrics and the last lyric) Jeremy Suarez
Phil Collins
No Yes
Welcome Phil Collins Yes No
Welcome Phil Collins
The Blind Boys of Alabama
Yes Yes
No Way Out (theme from Brother Bear) Phil Collins Yes Yes
Look Through My Eyes Phil Collins Yes Yes (also on bonus material)

Score by Mark Mancina/Phil Collins

Deleted songs

  • "The Fishing Song" - This was intended for the salmon run sequence, but was replaced by "Welcome".
  • "This Can't Be My Destiny" This was song by Phil Collins. But unfortuantly it never made it to the movie. The song was however mention in the special feature by Phil Collins. This song was never released.

References

  1. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0328880/news Brother Bear (2003) - News
  2. http://www.animated-news.com/2003/brother-bear-two-thumbs-up/ Animated News » Brother Bear Two Thumbs Up!

Other websites

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