Bruce Fairchild Barton: Wikis

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Bruce Fairchild Barton (5 August 1886 – 5 July 1967) was an American author, advertising executive, and politician. [1][2][3]

Contents

Early years

Born in Tennessee in 1886, he graduated from Amherst College in 1907. He worked as a publicist and magazine editor before co-founding the Barton, Durstine & Osborn (BDO) advertising agency in 1919. Nine years later the agency merged with the George Batten agency to become Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn (BBDO). Barton headed the agency until 1961, building it into one of the industry's leaders. Among other famous campaigns, he created the character of "Betty Crocker". He is also credited with naming General Motors and General Electric. Politically conservative, he offered his public relations expertise to many Republican candidates over the years. A staunch opponent of Roosevelt and the New Deal, he served two terms in the United States House of Representatives (1937-1941), and ran in 1940 unsuccessfully for U.S. Senator from New York.

Barton was most famous, however, as the author of many bestselling guides to personal success. He also wrote literally hundreds of articles for popular magazines, offering readers advice and inspiration for pursuing the American dream. His most famous book, The Man Nobody Knows (1925), depicted Jesus Christ as a successful salesman, publicist and role model for the modern businessman. One historian writes: "Barton believed incurably in material progress, in self-improvement, in individualism, and in the Judeo-Christian ethic, and none of the profound crises through which his generation lived appreciably changed the tenor of his writings or their capacity to reflect what masses of Americans, optimists in the progressive tradition, apparently continued to want to hear."

Bruce Barton was a descendant of the Rev. John Davenport, the founder of Yale University, and of New Haven, Connecticut, through his mother.

1925 donation request letter receiving a 100% response

In 1925, Barton wrote a letter to 24 rich men who all replied with at least $1,000.

Dear Mr. Blank,

For the past three or four years things have been going pretty well at our house. We pay our bills, afford such luxuries as having the children’s tonsils out, and still have something in the bank at the end of the year. So far as business is concerned, therefore, I have felt fairly well content.

But there is another side to a man, which every now and then gets restless. It says: “What good are you anyway? What influences have you set up, aside from your business, that would go on working if you were to shuffle off tomorrow?”

Of course, we chip in to the Church and the Salvation Army, and dribble out a little money right along in response to all sorts of appeals. But there isn’t much satisfaction in it. For one thing, it’s too diffused and, for another, I’m never very sure in my own mind that the thing I’m giving to is worth a hurrah and I don’t have time to find out.

A couple of years ago I said: “I’d like to discover the one place in the United States where a dollar does more net good than anywhere else.” It was a rather thrilling idea, and I went at it in the same spirit in which our advertising agency conducts a market investigation for a manufacturer. Without bothering you with a long story, I believe I have found the place.

This letter is being mailed to 23 men besides yourself, twenty-five of us altogether. I honestly believe that it offers an opportunity to get a maximum amount of satisfaction for a minimum sum.

Let me give you the background.

Among the first comers to this country were some pure blooded English folks who settled in Virginia but, being more hardy and venturesome than the average, pushed on west and settled in the mountains of Kentucky, Tennessee, North and South Carolina. They were stalwart lads and lassies. They fought the first battle against the British and shed the first blood. In the Revolution they won the battle of King’s Mountain. Later, under Andy Jackson, they fought and won the only land victory that we managed to pull off in the War of 1812. Although they lived in southern states they refused to secede in 1860. They broke off from Virginia and formed the state of West Virginia; they kept Kentucky in the Union; and they sent a million men into the northern armies. It is not too much to say that they were the deciding factor in winning the struggle to keep these United States united.

They have had a rotten deal from Fate. There are no roads into the mountains, no trains, no ways of making money. So our prosperity has circled all around them and left them pretty much untouched. They are great folks. The girls are as good looking as any in the world. Take one of them out of her two-roomed log cabin home, give her a stylish dress and a permanent wave, and she’d be a hit on Fifth Avenue. Take one of the boys, who maybe never saw a railroad train until he was 21: give him a few years of education and he goes back into the mountains as a teacher or doctor or lawyer or carpenter, and changes the life of a town or county.

This gives you an idea of the raw material. Clean, sound timber – no knots, no wormholes; a great contrast to the imported stuff with which our social settlements have to work in New York and other cities.

Now, away back in the Civil War days, a little college was started in the Kentucky mountains. It started with faith, hope, and sacrifice, and those three virtues are the only endowment it has ever had. Yet today it has accumulated, by little gifts picked up by passing the hat, a plant that takes care of 3000 students a year. It’s the most wonderful manufacturing proposition you ever heard of. They raise their own food, can it in their own cannery; milk their own cows; make brooms and weave rugs that are sold all over the country; do their own carpentry, painting, printing, horseshoeing, and everything, teaching every boy and girl a trade while he and she is studying. And so efficiently is the job done that –

  • a room rents for 60 cents a week (including heat and light)
  • meals are 11 cents apiece (yet all the students gain weight on the faire; every student gets a quart of milk a day)
  • the whole cost to a boy or girl for a year’s study – room, board, books, etc., - is $146. More than half of this the student earns by work; many students earn all.

One boy walked in a hundred miles, leading a cow. He stabled the cow in the village, milked her night and morning, peddled the milk, and put himself through college. He is now a major in the United States Army. His brother, who owned half of the cow, is a missionary in Africa. Seventy-five percent of the graduates go back to the mountains, and their touch is on the mountain counties of five states; better homes, better food, better child health, better churches, better schools; no more feuds; lower death rates.

Now we come to the hook. It costs this college, which is named Berea, $100 a year per student to carry on. She could, of course, turn away 1500 students each year and break even on the other 1500. Or she could charge $100 tuition. But then she would be just one more college for the well-to-do. Either plan would be a moral crime. The boys and girls in those one-room and two-room cabins deserve a chance. They are of the same stuff as Lincoln and Daniel Boone and Henry Clay; they are the very best raw material that can be found in the United States.

I have agreed to take ten boys and pay the deficit on their education each year, $1,000. I have agreed to do this if I can get twenty-four other men who will each take ten. The president, Dr. William J. Hutchins (Yale 1892), who ought to be giving every minute of his time to running the college, is out passing the hat and riding the rails from town to town. He can manage to get $50,000 or $70,000 a year. I want to lift part of his load by turning in $25,000.

This is my proposition to you. Let me pick out ten boys, who are as sure blooded Americans as your own sons, and just as deserving of a chance. Let me send you their names and tell you in confidence, for we don’t want to hurt their pride, where they come from and what they hope to do with their lives. Let me report to you on their progress three times a year. You write me, using the enclosed envelope, that, if and when I get my other twenty-three men, you will send President Hutchins your check for $1,000. If you will do this I’ll promise you the best time you have ever bought for a thousand dollars.

Most of the activities to which we give in our lives stop when we stop. But our families go on; and young life goes on and matures and gives birth to other lives. For a thousand dollars a year you can put ten boys or girls back into the mountains who will be a leavening influence in ten towns or counties, and their children will bear the imprint of your influence. Honestly, can you think of any other investment that would keep your life working in the world so long a time after you are gone?

This is a long letter, and I could be writing a piece for the magazines and collecting for it in the time it has taken me to turn it out. So, remember that this is different from any other appeal that ever came to you. Most appeals are made by people who profit from a favorable response, but this appeal is hurting me a lot more than it can possibly hurt you. What will you have, ten boys or ten girls?

Cordially yours,

Bruce Barton 1

References

  1. ^ "Mr. Barton is Drafted". Time (magazine). October 7, 1940. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,802028,00.html. Retrieved 2008-04-11. "Redhaired, blue-eyed Bruce Barton, 54-year-old advertising tycoon, made millions selling Americans on reading (Dr. Eliot's Five-Foot Shelf); on clean collars (Cluett-Peabody collar ads); on shaving (Gillette); on working (Alexander Hamilton Institute); on Jesus and the Bible (The Man Nobody Knows, The Book Nobody Knows)."  
  2. ^ "Bruce Barton, Ad Man, Is Dead. Author, Former Representative. A Founder of B.B.D.O., Was Denounced by Roosevelt as Foe of New Deal.". New York Times. 6 July 1967. http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F20F10FB3B5E137A93C4A9178CD85F438685F9. Retrieved 2008-05-21.  
  3. ^ "Pioneer of Advertising, Bruce Barton, 80, Dies. Helped Found Large Agency. Opposed Roosevelt's New Deal as Congressman.". Los Angeles Times. 6 July 1967. http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/latimes/access/511865282.html?dids=511865282:511865282&FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:AI&date=Jul+06%2C+1967&author=&pub=Los+Angeles+Times&desc=Pioneer+of+Advertising%2C+Bruce+Barton%2C+80%2C+Dies&pqatl=google. Retrieved 2008-05-20. "Bruce Barton, 80, a pioneer of modern advertising, author and a Republican congressman who bitterly opposed the New Deal of Franklin D. Roosevelt, died Wednesday."  

External links

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Theodore A. Peyser
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 17th congressional district

1937-1941
Succeeded by
Kenneth F. Simpson
Party political offices
Preceded by
E. Harold Cluett
Republican Nominee for U.S. Senate from New York (Class 1)
1940
Succeeded by
Irving Ives
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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Bruce Fairchild Barton (5 August 18865 July 1967) was an American writer, advertising executive, and politician.

Contents

Sourced

  • A man may be down, but he is never out.
  • There are two seas in Palestine. One is fresh, and fish are in it. Splashes of green adorn its banks. Trees spread their branches over it and stretch out their thirsty roots to sip of its healing waters... The Sea of Galilee receives but does not keep the Jordan. For every drop that flows into it another drop flows out. The giving and receiving go on in equal measure. The other sea is shrewder, hoarding its income jealously. It will not be tempted into any generous impulse. Every drop it gets, it keeps. The Sea of Galilee gives and lives. The other sea gives nothing. It is named The Dead. There are two kinds of people in the world. There are two seas in Palestine.
  • Give advertising time. That is the thing that it needs most. The advertising agency is the most precious infant among the professions. Is it fair to expect perfection in a profession that counts only a single generation to its credit? We are learning. I see no reason why advertising agencies, too, should not outlive their founders and the successors of their founders, growing wiser with each generation and gathering a priceless possession of recorded experience.
    • BBDO Newsletter (1966)
  • I had never thought of advertising as a life work, though I had on the side, written some very successful copy.
    • As quoted in The Mirror Makers: A History of American Advertising and Its Creators (1984) by Steven Fox
  • The American conception of advertising is to arouse desires and stimulate wants, to make people dissatisfied with the old and out-of-date and by constant iteration to send them out to work harder to get the latest model—whether that model be an icebox or a rug or a new home.
    • As quoted in Fables of Abundance: a cultural history of advertising in America (1994) by Jackson Lears

The Man Nobody Knows (1924)

The Man Nobody Knows : A Discovery of the Real Jesus
  • To every man of vision the clear Voice speaks; there is no great leadership where there is not a mystic. Nothing splendid has ever been achieved except by those who dared believe that something inside themselves was superior to circumstance. To choose the sure thing is treason to the soul.
    • On Jesus, in Ch. 1 : The Executive
  • It is said that great leaders are born, not made. The saying is true to this degree, that no man can persuade people to do what he wants them to do, unless he genuinely likes people, and believes that what he wants them to do is to their own advantage.
    • Ch. 4 : His Method
  • Surely no one will consider us lacking in reverence if we say that every one of the "principles of modern salesmanship" on which business men so much pride themselves, are brilliantly exemplified in Jesus' talk and work.
    • Ch. 4 : His Method
  • Much brass has been sounded and many cymbals tinkled in the name of advertising; but the advertisements which persuade people to act are written by men who have an abiding respect for the intelligence of their readers, and a deep sincerity regarding the merits of the goods they have to sell.
    • Ch. 5 : His Advertisements
  • Generalities would have been soon forgotten. But the story that had its roots in everyday human existence and need, lives and will live forever. It condensed the philosophy of Christianity into half a dozen unforgettable paragraphs. The parable of the Good Samaritan is the greatest advertisement of all times.
    • Ch. 5 : His Advertisements
  • Learn their lesson, that if you would teach people you first must capture their interest with news; that your service rather than your sermons must be your claim upon their attention; that what you say must be simple, and brief, and above all sincere — the unmistakable voice of true regard and affection.
    • On the teachings of Jesus, in Ch. 5 : His Advertisements

Unsourced

  • Sometimes when I consider what tremendous consequences come from little things... I am tempted to think... there are no little things.

Misattributed

  • He was in fact an adman: persuading, recruiting followers, finding the right words to arouse interest and create desires, in short exemplifying all the principles of modern salesmanship.
    • Stephen R. Fox, summarizing Barton's beliefs regarding Jesus, in The Mirror Makers : A History of American Advertising and Its Creators (1984); this has been quoted as if it were a statement of Barton's.

Quotes about Barton

  • Bruce Barton's advertising career started quite accidentally. One of Collier's clients, the Harvard Classics "Dr. Elliot's Five-Foot Shelf of Books," had traditionally been sold on double page spreads. At the last minute, the pressroom man told Barton that he had an extra quarter page left to fill. Barton tore a page out of one of the classics, and asked his readers , "This is Marie Antoinette riding to her death. Have you ever read her tragic story?" Barton had created a unique benefit for his readers — cultural enrichment in less than fifteen minutes a day — and this simple idea sold over 400,000 sets of the classics.
    • Steven Fox in The Mirror Makers : A History of American Advertising and Its Creators (1984)
  • I knew I'd never be more than a second-rate business man and a second-rate writer — so I decided to add the two things together and be a first rate advertising man.
    • "Barnham Dunn" (a character based on Barton) in The Virgin Queene (1928) by Harford Powel Jr; quoted in The Mirror Makers: A History of American Advertising and Its Creators (1984) by Steven Fox

External links

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