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More interesting facts on Buddhism in Sri Lanka

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Theravāda

  Asokanpillar-crop.jpg  

Countries

  Sri Lanka
Cambodia • Laos
Burma • Thailand
 

Texts

 

Pali Canon
Commentaries
Subcommentaries

 

History

 

Pre-sectarian Buddhism
Early schools • Sthavira
Asoka • Third Council
Vibhajjavada
Mahinda • Sanghamitta
Dipavamsa • Mahavamsa
Buddhaghosa

 

Doctrine

 

Saṃsāra • Nibbāṇa
Middle Way
Noble Eightfold Path
Four Noble Truths
Enlightenment Stages
Precepts • Three Jewels

 
An ancient Buddha statue from Aukana Sri Lanka

Buddhism in Sri Lanka is primarily of the Theravada school, and constitutes the religious faith of about 70% of the population.[1] According to traditional Sri Lankan chronicles (such as the Dipavamsa), Buddhism was introduced into Sri Lanka in the 2nd century BCE by Venerable Mahinda, the son of the Emperor Ashoka, during the reign of Sri Lanka's King Devanampiyatissa. During this time, a sapling of the Bodhi Tree was brought to Sri Lanka and the first monasteries were established under the sponsorship of the Sri Lankan king. The Pali Canon, having previously been preserved as an oral tradition, was first committed to writing in Sri Lanka around 30 BCE.

Sri Lanka has the longest continuous history of Buddhism of any Buddhist nation, with the Sangha having existed in a largely unbroken lineage since its introduction in the 2nd century. During periods of decline, the Sri Lankan monastic lineage was revived through contact with Myanmar and Thailand. Periods of Mahayana influence, as well as official neglect under colonial rule, created great challenges for Theravada Buddhist institutions in Sri Lanka, but repeated revivals and resurgences- most recently in the 19th century CE- have kept the Theravada tradition alive for over 2000 years.

Contents

Christian missionaries and colonialism

From the 16th century onward, Christian missionaries and Portuguese, Dutch and British colonizers of Sri Lanka have attempted to convert the local population to Christianity. In the late 19th century, a national Buddhist movement started, inspired by the American Buddhist Henry Steel Olcott, and empowered by the results of the Panadura debate between a Christian priest and the Buddhist monk Migettuwatte Gunananda Thera.

Divisions in the Buddhist clergy

The different sects of the Sri Lankan Buddhist clergy are referred to as Nikayas, and three main Nikayas are:

Within these three main divisions there are numerous other divisions, some of which are caste based. There are no doctrinal differences among any of them.

See also

Distribution of Buddhism in Sri Lanka. Based on 2001 census data except for districts with numbers given in italics; these are from 1981 census

Notes

External links

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