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Bulgarian car number plates: Wikis

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A plate from Dobrich Province (2001-2007)
A EuroPlate plate from Sofia City (2008-today)

The standard Bulgarian license plate consists of a blue vertical strip (the European strip) on the left side of the plate containing either the flag of Bulgaria or that of the EU and the country code of Bulgaria (BG), always followed on a white surface, using black font, by the one- or two-letter province code, four numerals and a final one- or two-letter code, called a series.
They thus take the form X(X) NNNNY or X(X) NNNNYY. The one-letter 'series' appears primarily on mopeds and motorcycles, but also on some other older vehicles. All vehicular trailers (whether goods/agricultural trailers or caravans, etc) have E as the first letter of the 'series' suffix, ie CA 1234EX.


The format XX AAAAAA may be used instead the standard one, where A represents either letters or numbers chosen by the owner (a name for example). The price of such a custom plate is 3,500 (BGN7,000), so these are rare.

*1969 - Former series of X-Y-NNNN and XX-Y-NNNN no longer valid.

*1985 - System extended with a second serial letter in Sofia, eg A0001AA.

*1986 - Jan 1986: a new series on new style yellow plates introduced, with previous-style plates no longer valid.

*1992 - Since 1992, the letter license plate code used letters common to both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets, no matter whether they have the same phonetic value (as per ISO 3166-2:BG). This new 1992 series used a white background, and all former yellow background plates became invalid.

*1993 - The hyphens/stops between letter and number blocks were also phased out and also became invalid in 1993.

*2000-2006 - The left-hand blue band Bulgaria flag was phased in, eventually becoming a legal requirement on 1 Jul 2006.

*2007 - On the 1st Jan 2007 Bulgaria (BG) and Romania (RO) joined the European Union, and the standardised Europlate was introduced soon after.

In use are also three other types of plates: NNN T NNN — plate for transit of unregistered vehicle through Bulgaria; NNN H NNN — plate for a new vehicle, not registered yet; NNN B NNN — temporary plate for car dealers. These three types use a white background with black text and a red vertical strip on the right side. Usually, the expiry date is inscribed on the red strip.

Since 2006, all military vehicles' plates are subject to change with the new ones: the letters "BA" (for Bulgarian Army) and 6 digits — the form is BA NNNNNN. The same form is adopted for the new license plates of the Civil Protection Service of Bulgaria, beginning with "CP" (for Civil Protection) followed by 6 digits — CP NNNNNN. On the left side of both kinds of plates there's a blue vertical strip, same as the one described above.

Contents

License plate codes

Current province code Province Old province code (pink fields indicate changed codes)
А Burgas Province Бс, Б
В Varna Province Вн, В
ВН Vidin Province Вд, ВД
ВР Vratsa Province Вр, ВР
ВТ Veliko Tarnovo Province ВТ
Е Blagoevgrad Province Бл, БЛ
ЕВ Gabrovo Province Гб, Г
ЕН Pleven Province Пл, ПЛ
К Kardzhali Province Кж, К
КН Kyustendil Province Кн, КН
М Montana Province Мх, М
Н Shumen Province Ш
ОВ Lovech Province Лч, Л
Р Ruse Province Рс, Р
РА Pazardzhik Province Пз, ПЗ
РВ Plovdiv Province Пд, П
РК Pernik Province Пк, ПК
РР Razgrad Province РЗ
С and СА (since 2006) City of Sofia Сф, С, А
СН Sliven Province Сл, СЛ
СМ Smolyan Province См, СМ
СО Sofia Province СФ
СС Silistra Province Сс, СС
СТ Stara Zagora Province Сз, СЗ
Т Targovishte Province Тщ, Т
ТХ Dobrich Province Тх, ТХ
У Yambol Province Яб, Я
Х Haskovo Province Хс, Х

Army and Civil Protection plates

Additionally, there is a special code for Bulgarian Army and Civil Protection vehicles:

Current code Entity Old code
BA Bulgarian Army vehicles В, red on a white plate
CP Civil protection vehicles ГЗ

Diplomatic plates

Diplomatic and consular car number plates are similar to ordinary ones, but are recognizably different in their color: white symbols on a red background without the blue "Europlate" elements. Plates starting with "C" indicate diplomatic status, "CC" indicate consular status, while "CT" is used for cars belonging to other staff of diplomatic representations. Additionally, the first two digits of the numeric group represent the country of the diplomatic or consular mission to which the vehicle belongs. Two smaller digits in the upper right corner denote the expiry year of the plate.

Code Country
01 Great Britain
02 United States
03 United States
04 Germany
05 Turkey
06 unused
07 Greece
08 France
09 France
10 Italy
11 Belgium
12 Denmark
13 The Netherlands
14 Spain
15 Portugal
16 Sweden
17 Switzerland
18 Austria
19 Argentina
20 Japan
21 Finland
22 unused
23 Afghanistan
24 Algeria
25 Brasil
26 Venezuela
27 Ghana
28 Egypt
29 Ecuador
30 Ethiopia
31 India
32 Indonesia
33 Iraq
34 Iran
35 Yemen
36 Colombia
37 Kuwait
38 Libya
39 Lebanon
40 Morocco
41 Mexico
42 Peru
43 Syria
44 Uruguai
45 Ireland
46 Palestine
47 UNDP
48 UNCHR
49 International Monetary Fund
50 South Korea
51 Albania
52 Vietnam
53 Vietnam
54 free
55 free
56 Cambodia
57 China
58 China
59 North Korea
60 Cuba
61 Cuba
62 Mongolia
63 Nicaragua
64 Poland
65 Poland
66 Romania
67 Romania
68 Russian Federation
69 Russian Federation
70 Azerbaijan
71 Bosnia and Herzegovina
72 Hungary
73 Hungary
74 Czech Republic
75 Slovakia
76 Serbia
77 Malta
78 Kazachstan
79 South Africa
80 Holy See
81 European Commission
82 Slovenia
83 The World Bank
84 Croatia
85 EBRD
86 Republic of Macedonia
87 Cyprus
88 Norway
89 Ukraine
90 Moldova
91 Armenia
92 Belarus
93 unused
94 unused
95 Sudan
96 unused
97 unused
98 Georgia
99 Estonia

Foreigner and temporary plates

Finally, cars belonging to foreigners and imported into Bulgaria for a limited period of time are blue with white characters, starting with "XX", followed by four (meaningless) digits and two small digits denoting the expiry year.

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