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Bullshit
About
Alternative names I Doubt It, Bull, Cheat, BS, Bluff, Bullcrap
Skills required bluffing
Gameplay
Type Shedding-type
Players 3-8
Cards depends on number of players
Deck Anglo-American
Play Clockwise
Related games
Valepaska, Verish' Ne Verish' (Russian Bullshit), Poker Bull

Bullshit is a shedding-type card game. The object is for the player to discard all the cards from their hand. This is done by placing one or more cards, ostensibly of a stated value, on the discard pile. Others are allowed to challenge the veracity of the player's claim about the cards being played. The game has many nicknames, the most common including BS, Cheat, Bluff and I Doubt It, often used in situations where yelling 'bullshit!' may not be desirable, such as in games with children.

Contents

Dealing cards

The dealer deals each player an equal number of cards, or can deal the entire deck until it runs out. If there are remainders or too few cards to finish a full revolution of players, those cards are placed face-down to start the discard pile. One or more Jokers can be used for added strategy or to deal all cards evenly; adding both Jokers brings the total to 54, evenly divisible among 3 players, while an extra Joker from a similar deck makes the deck evenly divisible by 5.

The Stack

The center of the table will hold a pile of face-down cards played during the game. Play starts differently according to different rules. Some people start with the player to the dealer's left, while others start with whoever has the two of clubs, or the ace of clubs or spades, while yet others start with a joker (if used) or a special maker's card on some proprietary decks.

Game play

On each turn, in most variants, the player must play the cards he has of a certain rank. There are four common variants of the game.

  • In the first and most common, the rank must be one above the rank played by the previous player (aces, then twos, threes, fours, etc to Kings, then looping back around to aces). The player selects the cards to play, announces how many are being played and their rank (e.g. "two fours"), and places them face down in the pile in the center. If the player does not actually have the cards needed to play at least one of the correct rank, he is still required to play, and so must bluff, or "bullshit", hence the name of the game. It is permissible to bluff when the player does have cards of the given rank, for example, by playing and announcing "two Kings" when he has only one, or announcing "two Kings" and playing two of any other card. (It is usually required that the number of cards played must be correctly announced, e.g., announcing "two Kings" while playing three cards is a violation of the rules rather than a bluff.)
  • In another variant, the player can play a card one rank above, below, or the same rank as the previous card. This game is generally much shorter and involves less bluffing.
  • In a much rarer version of the game the players should only play one card and play the same suit as the previous player. The version's tactical elements are very different from the one dealt with in this article.
  • Another variant allows the players to play any number and rank of cards, with the previous person's played cards having no effect on the next player's choice of cards to play. In this variant the players can also lie about the number of cards, for example, saying "two Tens" when, in fact, they have placed down more than two cards.
  • A version, most often called cheat, it is acceptable to attempt to get rid of their cards by any means, for example; hiding their cards up their sleeves.

Optionally, jokers may be used as one of the following:

  • A "wild card" which is played as the stated value,
  • A separate rank from all others played between Kings and Aces, or
  • A "null" that is not any value and must always be bluffed.

Each play is open to challenge by the next player in sequence, or, in some variants, by any other player. The challenging player calls out the name of the game and turns over the cards that were just played to see if they match what that player announced. If the cards were correctly declared, then the challenger must pick up the entire stack; otherwise the bluffer must pick it up. In either case, the usual variant has the game continue with the next player in turn announcing the next rank. In some variants, after a failed bluff, the next player must then announce the same rank instead of the next one.

Endgame

The first player to get rid of all cards (and not lose a challenge on the final play) is the winner. The game may be continued to determine second place, etc., but typically stops when there are two players left, as there is no longer any opportunity to successfully bluff.

Cheat / Russian Bullshit / Chinese Bullshit and Indian Bluff

The variant Russian Bullshit is also known as Chinese Bullshit or, ambiguously, as Cheat.

The dealer deals out all the cards to all players, as evenly as possible. The first player to go chooses any rank to start with, and places any number of cards of that rank face-down. For example, the player may play "three Kings" or "five fours" or "eight Jacks". Bluffing is, of course, permitted.

The next player chooses from these options:

  1. If the player does not have the card in hand, he/she calls "skip/pass" and the next player goes in that order.
  2. Play more cards of the same rank, not the next higher rank as in regular Bullshit. The player may add any number of cards.
  3. Say "I Doubt It" (i.e., "Bullshit"). Note that a player may only say "I doubt it" if it is their turn. If the challenger is right, the previous person picks up all the cards and the challenger starts a new round. If the challenge is wrong, the challenger picks up all the cards and the next person (in some variants, the previous person gets the right to start a new round) starts a new round with the rank of his choice (there is a variant rule where, upon a call of "Bullshit", the caller only reveals one of the cards played at random. If the card is of the declared rank, the caller picks up the cards; if it is not, the previous person picks up all the cards and a new round begins).
  4. Say "I Believe". If the player is wrong, he/she picks up all the cards and the next person starts a new round with the rank of his/her choice. If the player is right, all the cards on the table are removed from the game and the challenger starts a new round with the rank of their choice. Another variant involves forcing the last player to pick up the pile of cards if the caller was correct. This option is not used in some variants.
  5. Pass. This option is not used in some variants; it allows more skill in bluffing because nobody is ever forced to lie. If every player passes, the cards on the table are removed from the game, and the last player to play a card starts the next round.

Even if Bullshit or BS or I Doubt is NOT yelled, just by simply turning over an opponent's hand signifies that they think their opponents last card play was Bullshit or the incorrect card to be played

The bluffing encouraged by this game becomes apparent when, for example, there are 16 supposed "queens" on the table from two decks of cards. Some rounds of play will escalate to the point that there are ludicrous numbers of cards in play, but nobody wants to challenge, because of the risk of picking up all the cards if the previous player was telling the truth.

After one player goes out, the game may continue to determine second place, third, etc.

There exist many variations of the game, including one where there are no turns and anybody may play or call another player's bluff at any time.

The Indian variant is called Bluff and is exactly the same, except that players do not have the "I Believe" option. Also players say "Bluff" instead of "I doubt it" and once a player has called "pass" they cannot play until the next round.

Hawaii version

In Hawaiian bullshit, like Russian bullshit, the entire deck is evenly dealt to all players and it does not matter who plays first. However, the next player only has options 1, 2, and 4. A player can challenge/BS (i.e., option 2) another player at any time, even if it is not their turn. Similar to Russian bullshit, bluffing can escalate to the point where there are 16 supposed "queens" on the table.

Egyptian version

In Egyptian bullshit, like Russian bullshit the entire deck is evenly dealt to all players, the player with the ace of hearts goes first, the following player can can play a card one rank above, below or the rank as the first player. Where Egyptian bullshit differs is when a player challenges a players call. If the challenger calls correct the player who put down the cards and got caught cheating picks up all the cards. The game is restarted by the challenger, who is rewarded for correctly noticing that the previous player was cheating. However if the challenger was incorrect the challenger subsequently picks up all the cards in the pile and the player who originally played down the cards restarts the game as a reward for deceiving the challenger.

Royals Cheat

Another version of cheat, where rules follow as in regular cheat save that royal cards (Jack, Queen and King) are not valid plays. The player is required to "cheat" out their royal cards and so increasing the tactical challenge of the game. The order of cards is altered so that 10 loops back to Ace to close the gap left by the royals.

References


BS (game) (card game)
Alternate names I Doubt It, Bull, Cheat, BS
Type Shedding-type
Players 3-8
Deck depends on number of players
Cards Anglo-American
Play Clockwise
Related games Valepaska, Verish' Ne Verish' (Russian Bullshit), Poker Bull
Skills required bluffing

Bullshit is a shedding-type card game. The object is for the player to discard all the cards from their hand. This is done by placing one or more cards, ostensibly of a stated value, on the discard pile, while others are allowed to challenge the correctness of the player's statement about the cards being played. The game has many nicknames, the most common including BS, Cheat, and I Doubt It, often used in situations where yelling 'bullshit!' may not be desirable, such as in games with children.

Contents

Dealing cards

The dealer deals each player an equal number of cards, or can deal the entire deck until it runs out. If there are remainders or too few cards to finish a full revolution of players, those cards are placed face-down to start the discard pile. One or more Jokers can be used for added strategy or to deal all cards evenly; adding both Jokers brings the total to 54, evenly divisible among 3 players, while an extra Joker from a similar deck makes the deck evenly divisible by 5.

The Stack

The center of the table will hold a pile of face-down cards played during the game. Play starts differently according to different rules. Some people start with the player to the dealer's left, while others start with whoever has the two of clubs, or the ace of clubs or spades, while yet others start with a joker (if used) or a special maker's card on some proprietary decks.

Game play

At the beginning of the game, the dealer passes out the whole deck to all of the players in the game. Then the person with the ace of spades puts it down to begin the game.

On each turn, in most variants, the player must play the cards he has of a certain rank. There are four common variants of the game.

  • In the first and most common, the rank must be one above the rank played by the previous player (aces, then twos, threes, fours, etc to Kings, then looping back around to aces). The player selects the cards to play, announces how many are being played and their rank (e.g. "two fours"), and places them face down in the pile in the center. If the player does not actually have the cards needed to play at least one of the correct rank, he is still required to play, and so must bluff, or "bullshit", hence the name of the game. It is permissible to bluff when the player does have cards of the given rank, for example, by playing and announcing "two Kings" when he has only one, or announcing "two Kings" and he can play two of any other card.

Also, once the person's turn is over, and the next players goes, if you played a bluff, you can say "peanut butter" or some other word calling that you bluffed in the previous turn. Some varieties of the game are different

Sometimes, one can play up to six of one card number if there are wild cards or jokers in the game. For example, if a player had all four aces and both of the jokers in his hand, he can say "six aces" if he plays (or lies about) the four aces and the two jokers.

  • In another variant of BS, the player can play a card one rank above, below, or the same rank as the previous card. This game is generally much shorter and involves less cheating.
  • In a much rarer version of the game the players should only play one card and play the same suit as the previous player. The version's tactical elements are very different from the one dealt with in this article.
  • In the game of BS, you are only allowed to place the amount of cards you said on the table. For example, you cannot say two tens, and put down four or so cards. If a player cheats and does this, the result is taking the pile, and losing four turns. After a player cheats three times, they are disqualified.
  • Another variant of BS is where the players are allowed to play any number and rank of cards, with the previous person's played cards having no effect on the next player's choice of cards to play, on this variant the players can also lie about their cards placed down, for example, saying "2 Tens" when, in fact, they have placed down more than 2 cards.

Optionally, jokers may be used as one of the following:

  • A "wild card" which is played as the stated value,
  • A separate rank from all others played between Kings and Aces, or
  • A "null" that is not any value and must always be bluffed.

The next part of the game is subject to two major variations. After each player takes his turn and before the next player has, one of two things can happen.

  • In the first variant, any of the other players can call out the name of the game (i.e. "Cheat", "Bullshit", "Bluff") to challenge the cards that were just played. In some games, the players agree to either wait before playing their turn so other players can think carefully about challenging, or to rapidly take their turns to put more pressure on challengers.
  • In the second variant, only the player about to lay down cards can challenge the cards laid down instead.

When a player calls out to challenge, they turn over enough cards from the top of the pile to decide if the cards just played were legitimate (this should be the number of the cards that the player who just took his turn announced; however, it is generally acceptable to turn over more if cheating as described later is suspected). If it turns out that the player played the amount and rank of cards that he announced, the challenger takes the whole pile that had accumulated in the center. If the player was bluffing and did not put down what he announced, he takes the whole pile.If the player bluffed, you can choose to either skip the card or make the next player play the same card. (Ex. One person BS on Kings, the next player must put down-if he/she has any or all the kings they have.

Endgame

Depending on the version of the game, either the first player to get rid of all their cards (and not lose any challenge on their final play) is the winner (BS out!), or the game may continue to determine second place, third, etc. Unless variants are used that place cards out of play, once only two players are left the game generally ends as there is little opportunity to bluff and thus a player must win purely on luck. Since Bullshit is almost never played for money or other stakes, players who have already won (and thus have no cards) may decide to make a challenge that they intend to lose, so they can get cards to continue playing.

Cheat / Russian Bullshit / Chinese Bullshit

The variant Russian Bullshit is also known as Chinese Bullshit or, ambiguously, as Cheat.

The dealer deals out all the cards to all players, as evenly as possible. The first player to go chooses any rank to start with, and places any number of cards of that rank face-down. For example, the player may play "three Kings" or "five fours" or "eight Jacks". Bluffing is, of course, permitted.

The next player chooses from these options:

  1. If the player does not have the card in hand, he/she calls "skip/pass" and the next player goes in that order.
  2. Play more cards of the same rank, not the next higher rank as in regular Bullshit. The player may add any number of cards.
  3. Say "I Doubt It" (i.e., "Bullshit"). Note that a player may only say "I doubt it" if it is their turn. If the challenger is right, the previous person picks up all the cards and the challenger starts a new round. If the challenge is wrong, the challenger picks up all the cards and the next person (in some variants, the previous person gets the right to start a new round) starts a new round with the rank of his choice (there is a variant rule where, upon a call of "Bullshit", the caller only reveals one of the cards played at random. If the card is of the declared rank, the caller picks up the cards; if it is not, the previous person picks up all the cards and a new round begins).
  4. Say "I Believe". If the player is wrong, he/she picks up all the cards and the next person starts a new round with the rank of his/her choice. If the player is right, all the cards on the table are removed from the game and the challenger starts a new round with the rank of their choice. Another variant involves forcing the last player to pick up the pile of cards if the caller was correct. This option is not used in some variants.
  5. Pass. This option is not used in some variants; it allows more skill in bluffing because nobody is ever forced to lie. If every player passes, the cards on the table are removed from the game, and the last player to play a card starts the next round.

Although a player cannot challenge if it is not their turn, they are usually allowed to verbally advise the person whose turn it is to challenge.

The bluffing encouraged by this game becomes apparent when, for example, there are 16 supposed "queens" on the table from two decks of cards. Some rounds of play will escalate to the point that there are ludicrous numbers of cards in play, but nobody wants to challenge, because of the risk of picking up all the cards if the previous player was telling the truth.

After one player goes out, the game may continue to determine second place, third, etc.

There exist many variations of the game, including one where there are no turns and anybody may play or call another player's bluff at any time.

The Indian variant is called Bluff and is exactly the same, except that players do not have the "I Believe" option. Also players say "Bluff" instead of "I doubt it" and once a player has called "pass" they cannot play until the next round.

Hawaii version

In Hawaiian bullshit, like Russian bullshit, the entire deck is evenly dealt to all players and it does not matter who plays first. However, the next player only has options 1, 2, and 4. A player can challenge/BS (i.e., option 2) another player at any time, even if it is not their turn. Similar to Russian bullshit, bluffing can escalate to the point where there are 16 supposed "queens" on the table.

Egyptian version

In Egyptian bullshit, like Russian bullshit the enitre deck is evenly dealt to all players, the player with the ace of hearts goes first, the following player can can play a card one rank above, below or the rank as the first player. Where Egytain bullshit diiffers is when a player challenges a players call. If the challenger calls correct the player who put down the cars and got caught cheating picks up all the cards. The game is restarted by the challenger, who is rewarded for correctly noticing that the previous player was cheating. However if the challenger was incorrect the challenger subsequently picks up all the cards in the pile and the player who origninally played down the cards restarts the game as a reward for deceiving the challenger.

Royals Cheat

Another version of cheat, where rules follow as in regular cheat save that royal cards (Jack, Queen and King) are not valid plays. The player is required to "cheat" out their royal cards and so increasing the tactical challenge of the game. The order of cards is altered so that 10 loops back to Ace to close the gap left by the royals.

References








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