Burnet County, Texas: Wikis

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Burnet County, Texas
Map of Texas highlighting Burnet County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the U.S. highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Seat Burnet
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

1,021 sq mi (2,644 km²)
996 sq mi (2,580 km²)
25 sq mi (65 km²), 2.44
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

42,896
34/sq mi (13/km²)
Founded February 5, 1852
Named for David Gouverneur Burnet
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website http://www.burnetcountytexas.org/

Burnet County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of 2000, the population was 34,147. The 2008 Census Bureau Estimate was 44,488. Its county seat is Burnet[1]. Burnet is named for David Gouverneur Burnet, the first (provisional) president of the Republic of Texas.

Burnet County is part of the Marble Falls, TX, Micropolitan Statistical Area, as well as the Austin-Round Rock-Marble Falls, TX Combined Statistical Area.[2]

Contents

History

Alonso Álvarez de Pineda claim Texas for Spain.

  • 1685-1690 France plants its flag on Texas soil, but departs after only five years. [4]
  • 1690-1821 Spanish missions and settlements flourish in Texas.
  • 1821 Mexico claims its independence from Spain. Anglos from the north settle in Texas and claim Mexican citizenship.
  • 1851 Twenty Mormon families under the leadership of Lyman Wight establish a colony at Hamilton Creek [9], later to be known as Mormon Mills [10]
  • 1853 First post office is established at Hamilton.
  • 1860 - 235 slaves in Burnet County

After the war some former slaves left the county, but many stayed. A group of them settled on land in the eastern part of Oatmeal. In 1870 the black population of the county had increased to 358, keeping pace with the growth of the total number of residents; the number of blacks had fallen to 248 by 1880, however, and the number of new white residents was such that after 1890, blacks represented less than 3 percent of the total population. Some found work on farms and ranches, but by the turn of the century many had moved into the Marble Falls area to work in town. [12]

  • 1861
Voters reject secession from the Union. The issue divides the county.
February 1, Texas secedes from the Union
March 2, Texas joins the Confederate States of America

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,021 square miles (2,644 km²), of which, 996 square miles (2,580 km²) of it is land and 25 square miles (65 km²) of it (2.44%) is water.

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Major highways

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Demographics

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 34,147 people, 13,133 households, and 9,665 families residing in the county. The population density was 34 people per square mile (13/km²). There were 15,933 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 89.64% White, 1.52% Black or African American, 0.68% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 6.24% from other races, and 1.58% from two or more races. 14.77% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 13,133 households out of which 30.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.50% were married couples living together, 8.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.40% were non-families. 22.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.50% under the age of 18, 7.00% from 18 to 24, 26.00% from 25 to 44, 24.50% from 45 to 64, and 17.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 93.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,921, and the median income for a family was $43,871. Males had a median income of $30,255 versus $20,908 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,850. About 7.90% of families and 10.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.50% of those under age 18 and 7.90% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Cities and towns

Unincorporated places

Fairland

Gandy

Mahomet

Naruna

Scobee

Sherwood Shores

Sudduth

Watson

Notable people from Burnet County

  • Adam R. "Stovepipe" Johnson, Civil War general and the 1887 founder of Marble Falls, despite being blinded during the war.
  • Gerald Lyda (1923-2005), general contractor and cattle rancher, born and raised in Burnet County.
  • Logan Vandeveer, early Texas soldier, ranger, cattleman and civic leader. Vandeveer was a leader in presenting the petition to the legislature in 1852 to establish Burnet County and was instrumental in having the town of Burnet named the county seat

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/usamap.cfm. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/assets/bulletins/b10-02.pdf
  3. ^ Handbook of Texas, Burnet County http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/BB/hcb19.html
  4. ^ The Six National Flags of Texas http://www.lsjunction.com/facts/6flags.htm
  5. ^ Fort Croghan http://www.fortcroghan.org/
  6. ^ Portals of Texas, Pioneer monument http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth11961/
  7. ^ Handbook of Texas, Samuel Eli Holland http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/HH/fho27.html
  8. ^ The Evolution of a State by Noah Smithwick, http://www.oldcardboard.com/lsj/olbooks/smithwic/otd.htm
  9. ^ Hamilton Creek Park http://www.highlandlakes.com/burnet/
  10. ^ Morman Mills Cemetery http://www.interment.net/data/us/tx/burnet/mormon/mills.htm
  11. ^ Rootsweb Ancestry,com, Burnet County http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txburnet/markers2.html#MORMON%20MILLS
  12. ^ Handbook of Texas http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/BB/hcb19.html
  13. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links

Coordinates: 30°47′N 98°11′W / 30.78°N 98.18°W / 30.78; -98.18


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

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Burnet County, Texas
Map
File:Map of Texas highlighting Burnet County.png
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the USA highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded February 5, 1852
Seat Burnet
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 2.44
wikipedia:Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

34147
Time zone Central : UTC-6/-5
Website: http://www.burnetcountytexas.org/
Named for: David Gouverneur Burnet

Burnet County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of 2000, the population was 34,147. Its county seat is Burnet6. Burnet is named for David Gouverneur Burnet, the first (provisional) president of the Republic of Texas.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 2,644 km² (1,021 sq mi). 2,580 km² (996 sq mi) of it is land and 65 km² (25 sq mi) of it (2.44%) is water.

Major Highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 34,147 people, 13,133 households, and 9,665 families residing in the county. The population density was 13/km² (34/sq mi). There were 15,933 housing units at an average density of 6/km² (16/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 89.64% White, 1.52% Black or African American, 0.68% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 6.24% from other races, and 1.58% from two or more races. 14.77% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 13,133 households out of which 30.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.50% were married couples living together, 8.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.40% were non-families. 22.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.50% under the age of 18, 7.00% from 18 to 24, 26.00% from 25 to 44, 24.50% from 45 to 64, and 17.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 93.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,921, and the median income for a family was $43,871. Males had a median income of $30,255 versus $20,908 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,850. About 7.90% of families and 10.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.50% of those under age 18 and 7.90% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns

Notable people from Burnet County

  • Gerald Lyda (1923-2005), general contractor and cattle rancher, born and raised in Burnet County, founded Darragh & Lyda Inc. with Burnet County rancher Steinmetz Darragh, owned & operated Lone Star Livestock Commission Company in San Antonio and owned the 320,000 acre La Escalera Ranch in Texas; Darragh & Lyda, Inc., in a joint venture with H. A. Lott Inc. of Houston, Texas, built the Tower of the Americas and most of the major structures associated with HemisFair '68, San Antonio's world's fair. Lyda's company was nationally-recognized for its construction of The Alamodome.
  • Logan Vandeveer, early Texas soldier, ranger, cattleman and civic leader. Vandeveer was a leader in presenting the petition to the legislature in 1852 to establish Burnet County and was instrumental in having the town of Burnet named the county seat

External links



Coordinates: 30°47′N 98°11′W / 30.78, -98.18

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Burnet County, Texas. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Burnet County, TexasRDF feed
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Texas  +
Short name Burnet County  +

This article uses material from the "Burnet County, Texas" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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