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Born January 17, 1911(1911-01-17),
Toronto, ON, CAN
Height
Weight
5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Left wing
Defenceman
Shot Left
Pro clubs Toronto Maple Leafs
New York Americans
Boston Bruins
Career 1929 – 1944
Hall of Fame, 1971

Harvey "Busher" Jackson (January 19, 1911 in Toronto, Ontario - June 25, 1966) was a Canadian professional ice hockey left winger and defenceman who played for the Toronto Maple Leafs, Boston Bruins, and New York Americans in the National Hockey League.

Jackson played for the Toronto Marlboros along with future teammate Charlie Conacher, and joined the Leafs in 1929, just a few days after Conacher. He immediately made a splash in his first game, when he sent Montreal Canadiens star Howie Morenz to the ice with a hard check. A dazed Morenz told the young Jackson, "You'll do."

Shortly afterward, Jackson was knocked out of the lineup with an injury. Trainer Tim Daly asked him to carry his teammates' sticks, as was the tradition for rookies at the time. Jackson refused, saying "I'm not here to carry sticks. I'm here to play hockey." Daly called him "a fresh busher"—a term for someone who had just been called up from the minors. The nickname stuck.

Midway through his first season, Maple Leafs co-owner/manager/coach Conn Smythe put Jackson and Conacher on a line with another young forward, Joe Primeau. This created one of the greatest forward lines in NHL history, the Kid Line. They were an important part of the great Maple Leaf team that won the Stanley Cup in 1932.

After Jackson's scoring output dropped off in 1939, the Leafs traded him to the New York Americans for Sweeney Schriner. He played there for two years, and played his last three years with the Boston Bruins. Late in his career with Boston, he saw some time on defence due to the decimation of NHL rosters during World War II.

He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1971, which led directly to Smythe resigning as the Hall's president. There had been a falling-out between them several years earlier, and Smythe believed Jackson did not warrant admission to the Hall due to his character. In 1998, he was ranked number 55 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players.

Jackson is interred at Park Lawn Cemetery in Toronto.[1]

Career statistics

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1929–30 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 32 12 6 18 29
1930–31 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 43 18 13 31 81 2 0 0 0 2
1931–32 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 48 28 25 53 63 7 5 2 7 13
1932–33 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 48 27 17 44 43 9 3 1 4 2
1933–34 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 38 20 18 38 38 5 1 0 1 8
1934–35 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 42 22 22 44 27 7 3 2 5 2
1935–36 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 47 11 11 22 19 9 3 2 5 2
1936–37 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 46 21 19 40 12 2 1 0 1 2
1937–38 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 48 17 17 34 18 6 1 0 1 8
1938–39 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 42 10 17 27 12 7 0 1 1 2
1939–40 New York Americans NHL 43 12 8 20 10 3 0 1 1 2
1940–41 New York Americans NHL 46 8 18 26 4
1941–42 Boston Bruins NHL 27 5 7 12 8 5 0 1 1 0
1942–43 Boston Bruins NHL 44 19 15 34 38 9 1 2 3 10
1943–44 Boston Bruins NHL 42 11 21 32 25
NHL totals 636 241 234 475 437 71 18 12 30 55

References

External links

Preceded by
Howie Morenz
NHL Scoring Champion
1932
Succeeded by
Bill Cook
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