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Butch Wynegar
Catcher
Born: March 14, 1956 (1956-03-14) (age 53)
York, Pennsylvania
Batted: Switch Threw: Right 
MLB debut
April 9, 1976 for the Minnesota Twins
Last MLB appearance
May 24, 1988 for the California Angels
Career statistics
Batting average     .255
Hits     1,102
Runs batted in     506
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Harold Delano Wynegar, Jr. (born March 14, 1956 in York, Pennsylvania) is a former Major League Baseball catcher, and current hitting coach for the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees triple A affiliate of the New York Yankees.[1]

Contents

Minnesota Twins

Wynegar was drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the second round of the 1974 Major League Baseball Draft. In his first professional season, he batted .346 with eight home runs for the Rookie League Elizabethton Twins. He spent 1975 with the unaffiliated Reno Silver Sox of the California League, and again batted over .300. He made the Twins out of Spring training the following season, never having played double or triple A ball.

Wynegar was batting .294 with six home runs and 37 runs batted in at the 1976 All-Star break to be named to the American League All-Star team his rookie season. He drew a walk in his only at-bat, and became the youngest player at the time to appear in an All-Star Game (20 years, 212 days).[2] For the season, Wynegar batted .260 with ten home runs and 69 RBIs to finished second in the 1976 American League Rookie of the Year balloting to Mark Fidrych, and be named Sporting News Rookie Player of the Year.[3]

Wynegar had six home runs and 47 RBIs at the midpoint of the 1977 season to make his second consecutive All-Star team. He drove in a career high 79 runs for the season, and had established himself as one of the better fielding catchers in the American League by catching 43% of potential base stealers, and logging a .993 fielding percentage.

New York Yankees

On May 12, 1982, Wynegar and Roger Erickson were traded to the New York Yankees for Pete Filson, Larry Milbourne and John Pacella. He caught Dave Righetti's no hitter in Yankee Stadium against the Boston Red Sox on July 4, 1983, and caught both Phil Niekro's 3000th strike out & his 300th win in 1985. After three and a half seasons with the Yankees, Wynegar became a free agent and resigned with the Yankees for 1986. Playing in New York, however, proved to be too much for Wynegar that season. He shut himself down at the end of July, and asked for a trade at the end of the season.

California Angels

The Yankees complied with that wish, sending him to the California Angels for Ron Romanick and a player to be named later. Wynegar became a back-up for the first time in his career behind Bob Boone in California in 1987 and 1988.

Seasons Games AB Runs Hits 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO Avg. Slg. Fld% CS%
13 1301 4330 498 1102 176 15 65 506 10 626 428 .255 .347 .989 40%

Wynegar logged 10521 innings behind the plate in his career.

Coaching

In 1992, Wynegar coached at Rollins College. In 1994, Wynegar grabbed the reigns to the Baltimore Orioles' South Atlantic League affiliate, the Albany Polecats. A year later, he was named manager of the Florida State League's Charlotte Rangers, where he remained through the 1997 season, and spent the next five seasons as the Texas Rangers' roving hitting instructor. From 2003 to 2006 he was the hitting coach for the Milwaukee Brewers, but his contract was not renewed for the 2007 season.[4]

References

  1. ^ Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees 2009 field staff named
  2. ^ "1976 All-Star Game". baseball-reference.com. 1976-07-13. http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/NLS/NLS197607130.shtml.  
  3. ^ Charlton, James; Shatzkin, Mike; Holtje, Stephen (1990). The Ballplayers: baseball's ultimate biographical reference. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow. p. 1207. ISBN 0-87795-984-6.  
  4. ^ "Brewers won't renew contracts of three coaches". ESPN. 2006-09-28. http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=2606559.  







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