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(Redirected to Capital One Field at Byrd Stadium article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Byrd Stadium
View of the field at Byrd Stadium.
Location Stadium & Valley Drive, College Park, Maryland
Coordinates 38°59′25″N 76°56′50″W / 38.99028°N 76.94722°W / 38.99028; -76.94722Coordinates: 38°59′25″N 76°56′50″W / 38.99028°N 76.94722°W / 38.99028; -76.94722
Broke ground 1950
Opened September 30, 1950
Owner University System of Maryland
Operator University of Maryland, College Park
Surface Grass
Construction cost $1 million USD
Capacity 54,000
Tenants
Maryland Terrapins (NCAA)
(1950–present)
Baltimore Stars (USFL)
(1985)
Presidential Cup Bowl (NCAA)
(1950)
NCAA Division I men's lacrosse championship
(1972, 1979, 1989, 1993–1997, 1999, 2000)

Capital One Field at Byrd Stadium (usually simply "Byrd Stadium"), is an outdoor athletic stadium on the campus of the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland. It is the home of the Maryland Terrapins football and lacrosse teams, which compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The facility is named after Harry "Curley" Byrd, a multi-sport athlete, football coach, and university president in the first half of the 20th century. In August 2006, naming rights were sold to Chevy Chase Bank, which was subsequently acquired by Capital One.

Contents

History

Byrd Stadium empty
Byrd Stadium on game day

Byrd Stadium, constructed at a cost of $1 million, opened September 30, 1950 in order to replace an older, much smaller stadium of the same name. For four decades, Byrd Stadium consisted of a horseshoe-shaped bowl with capacity of 34,680. In 1991, the five-story Tyser Tower, featuring luxury suites and an expanded press area, was completed on the south side of the stadium, as well as the Gossett Football Team House adjacent to the east endzone. In 1995, the stadium's capacity was raised to 48,055 through the addition of an upper deck on the north side of the stadium. In November 2001, as the football team once again became an ACC-title contender, temporary bleachers were brought in for an additional 3,000 seats. Those bleachers remain to this day. In 2002, a full-color video scoreboard was added in the east endzone and an expansion of the Gossett Football Team House was begun. The athletic department hopes to parlay the success of the Ralph Friedgen era into a stadium expansion that will increase capacity to 65,000 in the next several years. Byrd Stadium's attendance record is 58,973, set on November 1, 1975. The record was achieved with temporary seating for a game featuring the #14 Terps and #9 Penn State.[1]

The lone version of the Presidential Cup college football bowl game was held here in December 1950. The USFL Baltimore Stars called the stadium home in 1985. Byrd Stadium has also hosted the Division I NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship ten times.[1]

Renaming and expansion plans

On August 24, 2006, the University of Maryland announced that it had agreed to a $20 million naming-rights deal with Chevy Chase Bank. Revenue from the deal will help pay for renovation and expansion of the stadium, which will include luxury suites and an increase in capacity.[2]

Summer 2007

On April 25, 2007 the Athletics Department unveiled plans for a $50.8 million expansion to Byrd Stadium, a project that will increase overall capacity, add skyboxes complete with catered food and flat panel televisions and lower the field to give spectators a better view.[3]

The first phase of the expansion plans will be renovating the current press tower and turning it into 64 luxury suites that will stretch from end zone to end zone. New mezzanine seating will be added as well, bringing the capacity from 51,500 to 54,000 [4]. This project is on schedule to be completed by the beginning of the 2009 season. A second LED video board was installed on the west side of the stadium just before the 2008 season. Phase two of the project will be adding around 8,000 seats to the west end zone and taking total capacity over 60,000. This will be paid for largely with the money generated from suite sales. There will also be numerous cosmetic improvements meant to make the stadium even more fan friendly. The final phase of the expansion includes replacing the existing natural grass field with artificial turf.[3]

Trivia

References

External links

Preceded by
Camp Randall Stadium
Host of the
Drum Corps International
World Championship

2000
Succeeded by
Ralph Wilson Stadium
Preceded by
Hofstra Stadium
Home of the
NCAA Lacrosse Final Four

1972
Succeeded by
Franklin Field
Preceded by
Rutgers Stadium I
Home of the
NCAA Lacrosse Final Four

1979
Succeeded by
Schoellkopf Field
Preceded by
Carrier Dome
Home of the
NCAA Lacrosse Final Four

1989
Succeeded by
Rutgers Stadium I
Preceded by
Franklin Field
Home of the
NCAA Lacrosse Final Four

1993 – 1997
Succeeded by
Rutgers Stadium
Preceded by
Rutgers Stadium
Home of the
NCAA Lacrosse Final Four

1999 – 2000
Succeeded by
Rutgers Stadium

Template:Infobox Stadium

Chevy Chase Bank Field at Byrd Stadium (usually simply "Byrd Stadium"), is an outdoor athletic stadium on the campus of the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland. It is the home of the Maryland Terrapins football and lacrosse teams, which compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The facility is named after Harry "Curley" Byrd, a multi-sport athlete, football coach, and university president in the first half of the 20th century. In August 2006, naming rights were sold to Chevy Chase Bank.

Contents

History


Byrd Stadium, constructed at a cost of $1 million, opened September 30, 1950 in order to replace an older, much smaller stadium of the same name. For four decades, Byrd Stadium consisted of a horseshoe-shaped bowl with capacity of 34,680. In 1991, the five-story Tyser Tower, featuring luxury suites and an expanded press area, was completed on the south side of the stadium, as well as the Gossett Football Team House adjacent to the east endzone. In 1995, the stadium's capacity was raised to 48,055 through the addition of an upper deck on the north side of the stadium. In November 2001, as the football team once again became an ACC-title contender, temporary bleachers were brought in for an additional 3,000 seats. Those bleachers remain to this day. In 2002, a full-color video scoreboard was added in the east endzone and an expansion of the Gossett Football Team House was begun. The athletic department hopes to parlay the success of the Ralph Friedgen era into a stadium expansion that will increase capacity to 65,000 in the next several years. Byrd Stadium's attendance record is 58,973, set on November 1, 1975. The record was achieved with temporary seating for a game featuring the #14 Terps and #9 Penn State.[1]

The lone version of the Presidential Cup college football bowl game was held here in December 1950. The USFL Baltimore Stars called the stadium home in 1985. Byrd Stadium has also hosted the Division I NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship ten times.[1]

Renaming and expansion plans

On August 24, 2006, the University of Maryland announced that it had agreed to a $20 million naming-rights deal with Chevy Chase Bank. Revenue from the deal will help pay for renovation and expansion of the stadium, which will include luxury suites and an increase in capacity.[2]


On April 25, 2007 the Athletics Department unveiled plans for a $50.8 million expansion to Byrd Stadium, a project that will increase overall capacity, add skyboxes complete with catered food and flat panel televisions and lower the field to give spectators a better view.[3]

The first phase of the expansion plans will be renovating the current press tower and turning it into 64 luxury suites that will stretch from end zone to end zone. New mezzanine seating will be added as well, bringing the capacity from 51,500 to 54,000[4]. This project is on schedule to be completed by the beginning of the 2009 season. The stadium will also be getting a second LED video board on the west side of the stadium in time for the 2008 season. Phase two of the project will be adding around 8,000 seats to the west end zone and taking total capacity over 60,000. This will be paid for largely with the money generated from suite sales. There will also be numerous cosmetic improvements meant to make the stadium even more fan friendly. The final phase of the expansion includes replacing the existing natural grass field with artificial turf.[3]

Trivia

References

External links

Template:Start |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Camp Randall Stadium |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Host of the
Drum Corps International
World Championship

2000 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Ralph Wilson Stadium |- |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Hofstra Stadium |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Home of the
NCAA Lacrosse Final Four

1972 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Franklin Field |- |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Rutgers Stadium I |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Home of the
NCAA Lacrosse Final Four

1979 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Schoellkopf Field |- |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Carrier Dome |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Home of the
NCAA Lacrosse Final Four

1989 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Rutgers Stadium I |- |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Franklin Field |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Home of the
NCAA Lacrosse Final Four

1993 – 1997 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Rutgers Stadium |- |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Rutgers Stadium |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Home of the
NCAA Lacrosse Final Four

1999 – 2000 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Rutgers Stadium |- |}


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