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CD86 molecule

PDB rendering based on 1i85.
Available structures
1i85, 1ncn
Identifiers
Symbols CD86; B7-2; B70; CD28LG2; LAB72; MGC34413
External IDs OMIM601020 MGI101773 HomoloGene10443 GeneCards: CD86 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE CD86 205686 s at tn.png
PBB GE CD86 205685 at tn.png
PBB GE CD86 210895 s at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 942 12524
Ensembl ENSG00000114013 ENSMUSG00000022901
UniProt P42081 Q3T9F8
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_006889 NM_019388
RefSeq (protein) NP_008820 NP_062261
Location (UCSC) Chr 3:
123.26 - 123.32 Mb
Chr 16:
36.52 - 36.59 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

The protein CD86 (Cluster of Differentiation 86) is a molecule expressed on antigen-presenting cells that provide costimulatory signals necessary for T cell activation and survival. It is the ligand for two proteins at the cell surface of T cells, CD28 antigen and CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4). CD86 is also known as B7.2. Its principal mode of action is by binding to CD28. Along with CD80, these molecules provide the necessary stimuli to prime T cells against antigens presented by antigen-presenting cells.

This gene encodes a type I membrane protein that is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Binding of this protein with CD28 antigen is a costimulatory signal for activation of the T-cell. Binding of this protein with CTLA-4 negatively regulates T-cell activation and diminishes the immune response. Alternative splicing results in two transcript variants encoding different isoforms. Additional transcript variants have been described, but their full-length sequences have not been determined.[1]

See also

References

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.

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