Canada national men's ice hockey team: Wikis

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Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For current information on this topic, see 2009–10 Hockey Canada national men's team.
Canada
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Team Canada (Équipe Canada)
Association Hockey Canada
General Manager Canada Steve Yzerman
Head coach Canada Mike Babcock
Assistants Canada Jacques Lemaire
Canada Ken Hitchcock
Canada Lindy Ruff
Captain Scott Niedermayer
Most games Sean Burke (156)
Most points Cliff Ronning (156)
IIHF ranking 1
Highest IIHF ranking 1 (first in 2003)
Lowest IIHF ranking 3 (2006)
Team colours               
Kit left arm canada red.png
Team colours
Kit body canada 2010 away.png
Team colours
Kit right arm canada red.png
Team colours
Team colours
Home colours
Kit left arm canada white.png
Team colours
Kit body canada 2010 home.png
Team colours
Kit right arm canada white.png
Team colours
Team colours
Away colours
First international
 Canada 8–1 Switzerland 
(Les Avants, Switzerland; January 10, 1910)
Biggest win
 Canada 47–0 Denmark 
(Stockholm, Sweden; February 12, 1949)
Biggest defeat
 Soviet Union 11–1 Canada 
(Vienna, Austria; April 24, 1977)
IIHF World Championships
Appearances 67 (first in 1920)
Best result Gold medal with cup.svg Gold: 18 - 1930, 1931, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1950, 1951, 1955, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1994, 1997, 2003, 2004, 2007
Olympics
Appearances 20 (first in 1920)
Medals Gold medal.svg Gold: 8 – 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1948, 1952, 2002, 2010

Silver medal.svg Silver: 4 – 1936, 1960, 1992, 1994

Bronze medal.svg Bronze: 2 – 1956, 1968
International record (W–L–T)
844–411–123
Olympic medal record
Men's ice hockey
Gold 1920 Antwerp Team
Gold 1924 Chamonix Team
Gold 1928 St. Moritz Team
Gold 1932 Lake Placid Team
Silver 1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen Team
Gold 1948 St. Moritz Team
Gold 1952 Oslo Team
Bronze 1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo Team
Silver 1960 Squaw Valley Team
Bronze 1968 Grenoble Team
Silver 1992 Albertville Team
Silver 1994 Lillehammer Team
Gold 2002 Salt Lake City Team
Gold 2010 Vancouver Team

The Canadian national ice hockey team is the ice hockey team representing Canada. The team is overseen by Hockey Canada, a member of the International Ice Hockey Federation, and participates in international competitions. From 1920 until 1963, Canada's international representation was by senior amateur club teams. Canada's national men's team was founded in 1963 by Father David Bauer as a part of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association, playing out of the University of British Columbia.[1] The nickname "Team Canada" was christened for the 1972 Summit Series and has been frequently used to refer to the Canadian national team ever since. Canada has been one of the leading national ice hockey teams in international play, winning the 1972 Summit Series against the Soviet Union, four of five Canada Cups dating back to 1976, 8 Winter Olympics (the most of any Nation), including the 2002 Winter Olympics and 2010 Winter Olympics, four consecutive IIHF World Championships and the 2004 World Cup of Hockey.

The current coach is Mike Babcock. Canada is currently ranked first in the IIHF World Ranking. Their performance of winning gold at the 2010 Winter Olympics, combined with their 7-3 elimination of Russia on February 24, 2010 cemented their standing as the number one hockey nation.

Contents

History

From 1920 until 1963, the senior amateur club teams representing Canada, were usually the most recent Allan Cup champions. The last senior team to win a gold medal at the World Championship was the Trail Smoke Eaters in 1961.

Following the 1963 World Championships, Father David Bauer founded the national team as a permanent institution. The new permanent national team first competed at the 1964 Winter Olympics. Since 1964, the national team has two Olympic gold medals, and five world championship wins.

Before the emergence of the Soviet Union, Canada dominated hockey, winning six out of seven golds at the Olympics before 1956 and 13 world championship gold medals before 1961. From 1954 to 1991, Canada was able to win only four World Championships and no Winter Olympic Gold medals when the Soviet, Czechoslovak, and Swedish teams dominated. This was in part because Canada's best professional players were unable to attend these events as they had commitments with their respective National Hockey League teams.

Canada withdrew from official IIHF events in 1970 and the National Team programme was suspended after they were refused permission to use semi-professional players at the world championship. Canada returned to the IIHF in 1977 after a series of negotiations between IIHF President Dr. Sabetzki and top officials of professional ice hockey in Canada and the United States of America. Canadians and Americans were allowed to enhance their world championship teams with professional players; and the world championships were scheduled as late as possible to ensure more players would be available from among the NHL teams eliminated from the Stanley Cup playoffs.

In return, a competition for the "Canada Cup" was to be played every four years on North American territory with the participation of Canada, the United States, and the four strongest European national teams, including professionals.

In 1983, Hockey Canada began the "Programme of Excellence", whose purpose was to prepare a team for the Winter Olympics every four years. This new National Team played a full season together all over the world against both national and club teams, and often attracted top NHL prospects, veteran pros with NHL experience and, in a few cases, current NHLers who were holding out in contract disputes. This programme was discontinued in 1998, when the NHL began shutting down to allow its players to compete.

In 2007, the Canadians regained their world title and won the world championship in Russia. The next year, in Canada, the team lost in the championship final to the Russians 5-4, and received the Silver Medal. This year, in Switzerland, the Canadians dominated the preliminary round; winning all three games, scoring 22 goals, and only giving up 4 goals. The scores were 6-1 (Belarus), 9-0 (Hungary), and 7-3 (Slovakia). After two other big wins against Norway (5-1) and Czech Republic (5-1), the team had its first loss against Finland (4-3). They then made it to the finals, but lost to Russia (2-1) and got the silver medal for the second year in a row.

At the 2010 Olympics, Canada won the gold medal with a 3-2 win against the USA in the final. Sidney Crosby's extra-time goal secured Canada the final gold medal of the Games [2]

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Retired numbers

  1. Steve Yzerman
  2. Mario Lemieux
  3. Wayne Gretzky

List of teams representing Canada from 1920 to 1963

Event Team Hometown
1920 Summer Olympics Winnipeg Falcons Winnipeg, Manitoba
1933 World Championships Toronto National Sea Fleas Toronto, Ontario
1934 World Championships Saskatoon Quakers Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
1935 World Championships Winnipeg Monarchs Winnipeg, Manitoba
1936 Winter Olympics Port Arthur Bearcats Port Arthur, Ontario
1937 World Championships Kimberley Dynamiters Kimberley, British Columbia
1938 World Championships Sudbury Wolves Sudbury, Ontario
1939 World Championships Trail Smoke Eaters Trail, British Columbia
World Championships not held from 1940–1946 during World War II.
1947 World Championships Did not participate
1948 Winter Olympics RCAF Flyers RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario
1949 World Championships Sudbury Wolves Sudbury, Ontario
1950 World Championships Edmonton Mercurys Edmonton, Alberta
1951 World Championships Lethbridge Maple Leafs Lethbridge, Alberta
1952 Winter Olympics Edmonton Mercurys Edmonton, Alberta
1953 World Championships Did not participate
1954 World Championships East York Lyndhursts East York, Ontario
1955 World Championships Penticton Vees Penticton, British Columbia
1956 Winter Olympics Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen KitchenerWaterloo, Ontario
1957 World Championships Did not participate
1958 World Championships Whitby Dunlops Whitby, Ontario
1959 World Championships Belleville McFarlands Belleville, Ontario
1960 Winter Olympics Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen KitchenerWaterloo, Ontario
1961 World Championships Trail Smoke Eaters Trail, British Columbia
1962 World Championships Galt Terriers Galt, Ontario
1963 World Championships Trail Smoke Eaters Trail, British Columbia

Coaches

List of coaches of the Canada men's national ice hockey team.

Olympics

  1. Gordon Sigurjonson, 1920
  2. Frank Rankin, 1924
  3. Conn Smythe, 1928
  4. Jack Hughes, 1932
  5. Al Pudas, 1936
  6. Sgt. Frank Boucher, 1948
  7. Louis Holmes, 1952
  8. Bobby Bauer, 1956, 1960
  9. Father David Bauer, 1964
  10. Jackie McLeod, 1968
  11. Lorne Davis, Clare Drake, Tom Watt (co-coaches), 1980
  12. Dave King, 1984, 1988, 1992
  13. Tom Renney, 1994
  14. Marc Crawford, 1998
  15. Pat Quinn, 2002, 2006
  16. Mike Babcock, 2010

Canada/World Cups

  1. Harry Sinden, 1972 Summit Series
  2. Bill Harris, 1974 Summit Series
  3. Scotty Bowman, 1976, 1981 Canada Cups
  4. Glen Sather, 1984 Canada Cup
  5. Mike Keenan, 1987 and 1991 Canada Cups
  6. Glen Sather, 1996 World Cup
  7. Pat Quinn, 2004 World Cup

World Championships

  1. Les Allen, 1930
  2. Blake Wilson, 1931
  3. Harold Ballard, 1933
  4. Johnny Walker, 1934
  5. Scotty Oliver, 1935
  6. John Achtzener, 1937
  7. Max Silverman, 1938
  8. Elmer Piper, 1939
  9. Max Silverman, 1949
  10. Jimmy Graham, 1950
  11. Dick Gray, 1951
  12. Greg Currie, 1954
  13. Grant Warwick, 1955
  14. Sid Smith, 1958
  15. Ike Hildebrand, 1959
  16. Lloyd Roubell, 1961, 1962
  17. Bobby Kromm, 1963
  18. Gordon Simpson, 1965
  19. Jackie McLeod, 1966, 1967, 1969
  20. Johnny Wilson, 1977
  21. Harry Howell, 1978
  22. Marshall Johnston, 1979
  23. Don Cherry, 1981
  24. Red Berenson, 1982
  25. Dave King, 1983
  26. Doug Carpenter, 1985
  27. Pat Quinn, 1986
  28. Dave King, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992
  29. Mike Keenan, 1993
  30. George Kingston, 1994
  31. Tom Renney, 1995, 1996
  32. Andy Murray, 1997, 1998
  33. Mike Johnston, 1999
  34. Tom Renney, 2000
  35. Wayne Fleming, 2001, 2002
  36. Andy Murray, 2003
  37. Joel Quenneville, 2004
  38. Marc Habscheid, 2005, 2006
  39. Andy Murray, 2007
  40. Ken Hitchcock, 2008
  41. Lindy Ruff, 2009

Competition achievements

Olympic Games

All Olympic ice hockey tournaments between 1920 and 1968 also counted as World Championships.[3]

Games Representative GP W L T GF GA Coach Manager/GM Captain Finish Ref.
1920 Antwerp Winnipeg Falcons 3 3 0 0 21 1 Sigurjohnson, GordonGordon Sigurjohnson Axford, H. A.H. A. Axford Fredrickson, FrankFrank Fredrickson 11 Gold [4]
1924 Chamonix Toronto Granites 5 5 0 0 110 3 Rankin, FrankFrank Rankin Hewitt, WilliamWilliam Hewitt Munro, DuncDunc Munro 11 Gold [5]
1928 St. Moritz University of Toronto Grads 3 3 0 0 38 0 Smythe, ConnConn Smythe Hewitt, WilliamWilliam Hewitt Porter, JohnJohn Porter 11 Gold [6]
1932 Lake Placid Winnipeg Hockey Club 6 5 0 1 32 4 Hughes, JackJack Hughes Marsh, LouLou Marsh Cockburn, WilliamWilliam Cockburn 11 Gold [7]
1936 Garmisch-
Partenkirchen
Port Arthur Bearcats 8 7 1 0 54 7 Pudas, AlAl Pudas Cochrane, MalcolmMalcolm Cochrane Murray, HermanHerman Murray 22 Silver [8]
1948 St. Moritz RCAF Flyers 8 7 0 1 69 5 Boucher, FrankFrank Boucher Watson, SandySandy Watson Mara, GeorgeGeorge Mara 11 Gold [9]
1952 Oslo Edmonton Mercurys 8 7 0 1 71 14 Holmes, LouLou Holmes Christianson, JimJim Christianson Dawe, BillyBilly Dawe 11 Gold [10]
1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen 8 6 2 0 53 12 Bauer, BobbyBobby Bauer Gorman, ErnieErnie Gorman McKenzie, JackJack McKenzie 33 Bronze [11]
1960 Squaw Valley Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen 7 6 1 0 55 15 Bauer, BobbyBobby Bauer Gorman, ErnieErnie Gorman Sinden, HarryHarry Sinden 22 Silver [12]
1964 Innsbruck 7 5 2 0 32 17 Bauer, DavidDavid Bauer Hindmarch, BobBob Hindmarch Akervall, HankHank Akervall 4th [13]
1968 Grenoble 7 5 2 0 28 15 McLeod, JackieJackie McLeod Bauer, DavidDavid Bauer Johnston, MarshallMarshall Johnston 33 Bronze [14]
1980 Lake Placid 6 3 3 0 29 18 Davis, LorneLorne Davis
Drake, ClareClare Drake
Watt, TomTom Watt
Noonan, RickRick Noonan Gregg, RandyRandy Gregg 6th [15]
1984 Sarajevo 7 4 3 0 24 16 King, DaveDave King King, DaveDave King Tippett, DaveDave Tippett 4th [16]
1988 Calgary 8 5 2 1 31 21 King, DaveDave King King, DaveDave King Yawney, TrentTrent Yawney 4th [17]
1992 Albertville 8 6 2 0 37 17 King, DaveDave King King, DaveDave King Schlegel, BradBrad Schlegel 22 Silver [18]
1994 Lillehammer 8 5 2 1 27 19 Renney, TomTom Renney Kingston, GeorgeGeorge Kingston Joseph, FabianFabian Joseph 22 Silver [19]
1998 Nagano 6 4 2 0 19 8 Crawford, MarcMarc Crawford Clarke, BobbyBobby Clarke Lindros, EricEric Lindros[20] 4th [21]
2002 Salt Lake City 6 4 1 1 22 14 Quinn, PatPat Quinn Gretzky, WayneWayne Gretzky Lemieux, MarioMario Lemieux 11 Gold
2006 Turin 6 3 3 0 15 11 Quinn, PatPat Quinn Gretzky, WayneWayne Gretzky Sakic, JoeJoe Sakic 7th
2010 Vancouver 6 5 1 32 14 Babcock, MikeMike Babcock Yzerman, SteveSteve Yzerman Niedermayer, ScottScott Niedermayer 11 Gold [22]

Summit Series

Canada Cup

  • 1976 - Won championship
  • 1981 - Lost Final
  • 1984 - Won championship
  • 1987 - Won championship
  • 1991 - Won championship

World Cup of Hockey

  • 1996 - Lost Final
  • 2004 - Won the World Cup

World Championships

All Olympic ice hockey tournaments between 1920 and 1968 also counted as World Championships.[3] The 1920 Olympics were the first world championship. IIHF World Championships were not held during the Winter Olympic years of 1980, 1984 or 1988.[3]

Year Location Result
1920 Antwerp, Belgium Gold
1924 Chamonix, France Gold
1928 St. Moritz, Switzerland Gold
1930 Chamonix, France; Berlin, Germany; Vienna, Austria Gold
1931 Krynica, Poland Gold
1932 Lake Placid, New York Gold
1933 Prague, Czechoslovakia Silver
1934 Milan, Italy Gold
1935 Davos, Switzerland Gold
1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany Silver
1937 London, Great Britain Gold
1938 Prague, Czechoslovakia Gold
1939 Zürich / Basel, Switzerland Gold
World Championships not held from 1940–1946 during World War II.
1947 Did not participate
1948 St. Moritz, Switzerland Gold
1949 Stockholm, Sweden Silver
1950 London, Great Britain Gold
1951 Paris, France Gold
1952 Oslo, Norway Gold
1953 Did not participate
1954 Stockholm, Sweden Silver
1955 Krefeld / Dortmund / Cologne, West Germany Gold
1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy Bronze
1957 Did not participate
1958 Oslo, Norway Gold
1959 Prague / Bratislava, Czechoslovakia Gold
1960 Squaw Valley, California Silver
1961 Geneva / Lausanne, Switzerland Gold
1962 Colorado Springs / Denver, Colorado Silver
1963 Stockholm, Sweden 4th place
1964 Innsbruck, Austria 4th place
1965 Tampere, Finland 4th place
1966 Ljubljana, Yugoslavia Bronze
1967 Vienna, Austria Bronze
1968 Grenoble, France Bronze
1969 Stockholm, Sweden 4th place
Canada did not participate in IIHF events from 1970–1976.
1977 Vienna, Austria 4th place
1978 Prague, Czechoslovakia Bronze
1979 Moscow, Soviet Union 4th place
1981 Gothenburg / Stockholm, Sweden 4th place
1982 Helsinki / Tampere, Finland Bronze
1983 Düsseldorf / Dortmund / Munich, West Germany Bronze
1985 Prague, Czechoslovakia Silver
1986 Moscow, Soviet Union Bronze
1987 Vienna, Austria 4th place
1989 Stockholm / Södertälje, Sweden Silver
1990 Berne / Fribourg, Switzerland 4th place
1991 Turku / Helsinki / Tampere, Finland Silver
1992 Prague / Bratislava, Czechoslovakia 7th place
1993 Dortmund / Munich, Germany 4th place
1994 Bolzano / Canazei / Milano, Italy Gold
1995 Stockholm / Gävle, Sweden Bronze
1996 Vienna, Austria Silver
1997 Helsinki / Turku / Tampere, Finland Gold
1998 Zürich / Basel, Switzerland 6th place
1999 Oslo / Lillehammer / Hamar, Norway 4th place
2000 Saint Petersburg, Russia 4th place
2001 Cologne / Hanover / Nuremberg, Germany 5th place
2002 Gothenburg / Karlstad / Jönköping, Sweden 6th place
2003 Helsinki / Tampere / Turku, Finland Gold
2004 Prague / Ostrava, Czech Republic Gold
2005 Innsbruck / Vienna, Austria Silver
2006 Riga, Latvia 4th place
2007 Moscow / Mytishchi, Russia Gold
2008 Quebec City / Halifax, Canada Silver
2009 Berne / Kloten, Switzerland Silver

Spengler Cup

Spengler Cup victories for Team Canada have occurred in 1984, 1986, 1987, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2002, 2003 and 2007. In this tournament, Canada competes against European club teams, not against national teams. These opposing teams often have Canadians on their rosters. Canada used to be represented by the standing national team at this event, but since its dissolution is usually made up of Canadians playing in European leagues.

Rosters

2010 Olympics roster

The following is the Canadian roster in the men's ice hockey tournament of the 2010 Winter Olympics.[23]

No. Pos.
Name
Height Weight Birthdate Birthplace 2009–10 team
30 G Brodeur, MartinMartin Brodeur 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 000000000000009898 kg (220 lb) 01972-05-06 6 May 1972 Montreal, QC New Jersey Devils (NHL)
29 G Fleury, Marc-AndreMarc-André Fleury 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 000000000000008282 kg (180 lb) 01984-11-28 28 November 1984 Sorel, QC Pittsburgh Penguins (NHL)
1 G Luongo, RobertoRoberto Luongo 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 000000000000009393 kg (210 lb) 01979-04-04 4 April 1979 Montreal, QC Vancouver Canucks (NHL)
22 D Boyle, DanDan Boyle 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 000000000000008686 kg (190 lb) 01976-07-12 12 July 1976 Ottawa, ON San Jose Sharks (NHL)
8 D Doughty, DrewDrew Doughty 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 000000000000009292 kg (200 lb) 01989-12-08 8 December 1989 London, ON Los Angeles Kings (NHL)
2 D Keith, DuncanDuncan Keith 183 cm (6 ft 0 in) 000000000000008585 kg (190 lb) 01983-07-16 16 July 1983 Winnipeg, MB Chicago Blackhawks (NHL)
27 D Niedermayer, ScottScott NiedermayerC 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 000000000000009191 kg (200 lb) 01973-08-31 31 August 1973 Cranbrook, BC Anaheim Ducks (NHL)
20 D Pronger, ChrisChris ProngerA 198 cm (6 ft 6 in) 0000000000000101101 kg (220 lb) 01974-10-10 10 October 1974 Dryden, ON Philadelphia Flyers (NHL)
7 D Seabrook, BrentBrent Seabrook 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 0000000000000100100 kg (220 lb) 01985-04-20 20 April 1985 Richmond, BC Chicago Blackhawks (NHL)
6 D Weber, SheaShea Weber 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 000000000000009797 kg (210 lb) 01985-08-14 14 August 1985 Sicamous, BC Nashville Predators (NHL)
37 F Bergeron, PatricePatrice Bergeron 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 000000000000008888 kg (190 lb) 01985-07-24 24 July 1985 L'Ancienne-Lorette, QC Boston Bruins (NHL)
87 F Crosby, SidneySidney CrosbyA 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 000000000000009090 kg (200 lb) 01987-08-07 7 August 1987 Cole Harbour, NS Pittsburgh Penguins (NHL)
51 F Getzlaf, RyanRyan Getzlaf 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 0000000000000100100 kg (220 lb) 01985-05-10 10 May 1985 Regina, SK Anaheim Ducks (NHL)
15 F Heatley, DanyDany Heatley 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 0000000000000100100 kg (220 lb) 01981-01-21 21 January 1981 Freiburg im Breisgau, West Germany San Jose Sharks (NHL)
12 F Iginla, JaromeJarome IginlaA 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 000000000000009595 kg (210 lb) 01977-07-01 1 July 1977 Edmonton, AB Calgary Flames (NHL)
11 F Marleau, PatrickPatrick Marleau 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 0000000000000100100 kg (220 lb) 01979-09-15 15 September 1979 Swift Current, SK San Jose Sharks (NHL)
10 F Morrow, BrendenBrenden Morrow 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 000000000000009595 kg (210 lb) 01979-01-16 16 January 1979 Carlyle, SK Dallas Stars (NHL)
61 F Nash, RickRick Nash 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 000000000000009999 kg (220 lb) 01984-06-16 16 June 1984 Brampton, ON Columbus Blue Jackets (NHL)
18 F Richards, MikeMike Richards 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 000000000000009191 kg (200 lb) 01985-02-11 11 February 1985 Kenora, ON Philadelphia Flyers (NHL)
24 F Perry, CoreyCorey Perry 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 000000000000009595 kg (210 lb) 01985-05-16 16 May 1985 Peterborough, ON Anaheim Ducks (NHL)
21 F Staal, EricEric Staal 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 000000000000009393 kg (210 lb) 01984-10-29 29 October 1984 Thunder Bay, ON Carolina Hurricanes (NHL)
19 F Thornton, JoeJoe Thornton 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 0000000000000107107 kg (240 lb) 01979-07-02 2 July 1979 London, ON San Jose Sharks (NHL)
16 F Toews, JonathanJonathan Toews 188 cm (6 ft 2 in) 000000000000009696 kg (210 lb) 01988-04-29 29 April 1988 Winnipeg, MB Chicago Blackhawks (NHL)

The captain was Scott Niedermayer. (C)

The alternate captains were Jarome Iginla, Chris Pronger and Sidney Crosby. (A)

2009 World Championship roster

# Name Pos Birth place Age Club League
20 Armstrong, Colby F Lloydminster, Saskatchewan 26 Atlanta Thrashers NHL
55 Coburn, Braydon D Calgary, Alberta 24 Philadelphia Flyers NHL
19 Doan, Shane (C) F Halkirk, Alberta 32 Phoenix Coyotes NHL
3 Doughty, Drew D London, Ontario 19 Los Angeles Kings NHL
12 Fisher, Mike F Peterborough, Ontario 28 Ottawa Senators NHL
2 Hamhuis, Dan D Smithers, British Columbia 26 Nashville Predators NHL
37 Harding, Josh G Regina, Saskatchewan 24 Minnesota Wild NHL
15 Heatley, Dany (A) F Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany 28 San Jose Sharks NHL
10 Horcoff, Shawn F Trail, British Columbia 30 Edmonton Oilers NHL
29 Kwiatkowski, Joel D Kindersley, Saskatchewan 32 Severstal Cherepovets KHL
18 Lombardi, Matthew F Montreal, Quebec 27 Phoenix Coyotes NHL
50 Mason, Chris G Red Deer, Alberta 33 St Louis Blues NHL
28 Neal, James F Whitby, Ontario 21 Dallas Stars NHL
4 Phillips, Chris (A) D Calgary, Alberta 31 Ottawa Senators NHL
30 Roloson, Dwayne G Simcoe, Ontario 39 New York Islanders NHL
9 Roy, Derek F Ottawa, Ontario 25 Buffalo Sabres NHL
5 Schenn, Luke D Saskatoon, Saskatchewan 19 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL
91 Spezza, Jason F Mississauga, Ontario 25 Ottawa Senators NHL
26 St. Louis, Martin (A) F Laval, Quebec 33 Tampa Bay Lightning NHL
17 Stamkos, Steven F Markham, Ontario 19 Tampa Bay Lightning NHL
8 Upshall, Scottie F Fort McMurray, Alberta 25 Phoenix Coyotes NHL
44 Vlasic, Marc-Édouard D Montréal, Québec 22 San Jose Sharks NHL
6 Weber, Shea (A) D Salmon Arm, British Columbia 23 Nashville Predators NHL
7 White, Ian D Steinbach, Manitoba 24 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL
16 Zajac, Travis F Winnipeg, Manitoba 23 New Jersey Devils NHL

See also

Notes

References

  • Podnieks, Andrew (1997), Canada's Olympic Hockey Teams: The Complete History, 1920–1998, Toronto: Doubleday Canada, ISBN 0-385-25688-4 
  • Wallechinsky, David (2002), The Complete Book of the Winter Olympics (2002 ed.), New York: The Overlook Press, ISBN 1-58567-185-1 

External links


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