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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Drug subcultures are examples of countercultures, primarily defined by recreational drug use.

Drug subcultures are groups of people united by a common understanding of the meaning and value (good or otherwise) of the incorporation into life of the drug in question. Such unity can take many forms, from friends who take the drug together, possibly obeying certain rules of etiquette, to full-scale political movements for the reform of drug laws. The sum of these parts can be considered an individual drug's "culture".

There are multiple drug subcultures based on the use of different drugs — the culture surrounding cannabis, for example, is very different from that of heroin, due to the different sort of experiences, sentiment amongst the crowd attracted to the drug in question, as well as the problems the users encounter.[1]

Drugs also play an important role in various other subcultures, such as reggae music, Rastafari, hippie movements, drug dealing, as well as rave culture. Many artists, especially in 20th century and since then, used various drugs and explored their influence on human life in general and particularly on the creative process[2]. Hunter S. Thompson's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas employs drug use as a major theme and provides a critique of the drug culture of the 1960s.

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Cannabis Culture
Categories Online Magazine
Publisher Marc Emery
Country Canada
Language English
Website wwww.cannabisculture.com

Cannabis Culture is a Canadian online magazine (once a bimonthly magazine) devoted to cannabis and the worldwide cannabis culture. The website publishes stories about the struggle to legalize marijuana, profiles of marijuana paraphernalia, articles on how to grow marijuana, interviews with prominent marijuana users, and coverage of cannabis cultural events like the Nimbin MardiGrass festival and the High Times Cannabis Cup.

The magazine was founded in the spring of 1995 by Marc Emery, a prominent Canadian marijuana legalization activist who is the president of the BC Marijuana Party and well-known as the "Prince of Pot". Cannabis Culture Magazine evolved from a publication called "The Marijuana & Hemp Newsletter" launched by Emery in 1994.[1] For the first three years the magazine was named Cannabis Canada, but changed its name to Cannabis Culture with issue number 13, released in July 1998.[2]

The editor of the magazine for the first ten years was Dana Larsen, who left the magazine in April 2005, after issue 54.[3] The magazine thrived under Larsen with the help of the magazine's two regular writers, Pete Brady and Reverend Damuzi. Cannabis Culture is now edited by Jodie Emery and Jeremiah Vandermeer.

The print version of Cannabis Culture was printed in Canada and had a distribution of close to 100,000 copies across North America.[4]

In 2000, Cannabis Culture was pulled off store shelves in Timmins, Ontario, Canada. Local police told retailers that it was illegal because it was a "crime comic."[5] Publisher Marc Emery flew to Timmins and gave away copies in front of the police station,[6][7] and ultimately the police apologized. [8]

Because it promotes the use and cultivation of marijuana, Cannabis Culture Magazine is banned in some countries, such as Australia, and has had problems with New Zealand customs.[9]

In March 2009, Cannabis Culture ceased publication of its print version to devote its resources to its online version, an active website originally launched in March of 1995.

Cannabis Culture also hosts an active discussion forum, and is sister-site to the Pot TV Network.

On May 10, 2010, Emery was ordered to surrender to authorities and deport to the United States from his arrest. His wife, Jodie Emery, now runs Cannabis Culture.

References

External links


Cannabis Culture is an online magazine (once a bimonthly magazine) devoted to cannabis and the worldwide cannabis culture. The website publishes stories about the struggle to legalize marijuana, profiles of marijuana paraphernalia, articles on how to grow marijuana, interviews with prominent marijuana users, and coverage of cannabis cultural events like the Nimbin MardiGrass festival and the High Times Cannabis Cup.

In March 2009, Cannabis Culture ceased publication of its print version to devote its resources to its online version, an active website originally launched in March of 1995.

The print version of Cannabis Culture was printed in Canada and claimed to distribute close to 100,000 copies across North America.[1] The magazine was founded in the spring of 1995 by Marc Emery, a prominent Canadian marijuana legalization activist who is the president of the BC Marijuana Party and well-known as the "Prince of Pot". Cannabis Culture Magazine evolved from a publication called "The Marijuana & Hemp Newsletter" launched by Emery in 1994.[2]

For the first three years the magazine was named Cannabis Canada, but changed its name to Cannabis Culture with issue number 13, released in July 1998.[3]

The editor of the magazine for the first ten years was Dana Larsen, who left the magazine in April 2005, after issue 54.[4] Cannabis Culture is now edited by Marc Emery, Jodie Emery and Jeremiah Vandermeer.

In 2000, Cannabis Culture was pulled off store shelves in Timmins, Ontario, Canada. Local police told retailers that it was illegal because it was a "crime comic."[5] Publisher Marc Emery flew to Timmins and gave away copies in front of the police station,[6][7] and ultimately the police apologized. [8]

Because it promotes the use and cultivation of marijuana, Cannabis Culture Magazine is banned in some countries, such as Australia, and has had problems with New Zealand customs.[9]

Cannabis Culture also hosts an active discussion forum, and is sister-site to the Pot TV Network.

References

External links








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