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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For the battle, see Battle of Cannae.
Puglia

Cannae (mod. Canne della Battaglia) is an ancient village of the Apulia region of south east Italy. It is a frazione of the comune of Barletta.

Contents

Geography

It is situated near the river Aufidus (the modern Ofanto), on a hill on the right (i.e. , south) bank, 9.6 km (6 miles) southwest from its mouth, and 9 km southwest from Barletta.

History

It is primarily known for the Battle of Cannae, in which the numerically superior Roman army suffered a disastrous defeat by Hannibal in 216 BC (see Punic Wars). There is a considerable controversy as to whether the battle took place on the right or the left bank of the river.

In later times the place became a municipium, and remains of an unimportant Roman town still exist upon the hill known as Monte di Canne. In the Middle Ages it became a bishopric, and again saw military action in the second battle of Cannae, twelve centuries after the more famous one (1018). Ultimately the town was destroyed in 1276. Saint Roger of Cannes, (c. 1060 - 1138), was the most notable of the bishops.

See also

Notes and references

Coordinates: 41°17′47″N 16°09′06″E / 41.29639°N 16.15167°E / 41.29639; 16.15167


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

CANNAE (mod. Canne), an ancient village of Apulia, near the river Aufidus, situated on a hill on the right bank, 6 m. S.W. from its mouth. It is celebrated for the disastrous defeat which the Romans received there from Hannibal in 216 B.C. (see Punic Wars). There is a considerable controversy as to whether the battle took place on the right or the left bank of the river. In later times the place became a municipium, and unimportant Roman remains still exist upon the hill known as Monte di Canne. In the middle ages it became a bishopric, but was destroyed in 1276.

See O. Schwab, Das Schlachtfeld von Canna (Munich, 1898), and authorities under Punic Wars.


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