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Cape Canaveral, Florida
—  City  —

Seal
Location in Brevard County and the state of Florida
Coordinates: 28°23′18″N 80°36′13″W / 28.38833°N 80.60361°W / 28.38833; -80.60361Coordinates: 28°23′18″N 80°36′13″W / 28.38833°N 80.60361°W / 28.38833; -80.60361
Country  United States
State  Florida
County  Brevard
Incorporated 1963
Government
 - Type Council-Manager
 - Mayor Rocky Randels
 - City Manager Bennett Boucher
 - Mayor Pro Tem Robert "Bob" Hoog
Area
 - City 2.3 sq mi (6 km2)
 - Land 2.3 sq mi (6 km2)
 - Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 10 ft (3 m)
Population (1 July 2008)[1][2]
 - City 10,147
 - Density 4,411.7/sq mi (1,691.2/km2)
 - Metro 536,521
  Census Bureau estimate
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 32920
Area code(s) 321
FIPS code 12-10250[3]
GNIS feature ID 0279995[4]
Website www.cityofcapecanaveral.org

Cape Canaveral is a city in Brevard County, Florida, United States. The population was 8,829 at the 2000 census. As of 2008, the estimated population according to the U.S. Census Bureau was 10,147.[1] It is part of the Palm BayMelbourneTitusville Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

Geography

The city of Cape Canaveral is located at the northern tip of a barrier island on the Atlantic coast of Florida. It is due south of the geographical feature Cape Canaveral (known as Cape Kennedy from 1963 to 1973). It is separated from the mainland by the Banana River, Merritt Island and the Indian River from east to west.[5] Port Canaveral is an important port for cruise liners, which take on passengers here for cruises to the Caribbean.

Cape Canaveral is located at 28°23′18″N 80°36′13″W / 28.388382°N 80.603498°W / 28.388382; -80.603498.[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.1 km² (2.3 mi²). 6.0 km² (2.3 mi²) of it is land and 0.1 km² (0.04 mi²) of it (0.85%) is water.

History

In the early 1920s, a group of Orlando journalists invested more than $150,000 in the beach acreage that now encompasses the area of presidentially-named streets in Cape Canaveral. They called their development Journalista (now Avon-by-the-Sea) in honor of their trade. This seasonal retreat for inland residents was anticipated to become as popular a resort area as Cocoa Beach to the south, due to the construction of wooden bridge connecting Merritt Island to the area.

At that time, fishermen, retirees, and descendants of Captain Mills Burnham—the original official keeper of the Cape Canaveral Light—resided in the northern part of the present city. They owned acreage named Artesia that occupied the area that is now Port Canaveral.

Due to the hardships caused by the Great Depression, many investors defaulted on their holdings. Much of this land was recovered by newspaper owner R.B. Brossier and his son, Dickson, after they sold their Orlando home wand used the remaining $4,500 to purchase much of the Avon area. It was their dream that a port would be developed and a direct route to Orlando would be constructed.

By 1958 the area had grown with the Space Program. At that time, an adjacent city could annex an unincorporated area without a vote of the residents, so property owners were discussing the feasibility of forming a new city to prevent possible annexation by the City of Cocoa Beach. Landowners were asked for their opinion on this matter, and, due to substantial city debt and land taxes, most residents preferred not to become part of Cocoa Beach. So it was decided that the time was right to pursue incorporation and create a city of their own.[7]

Government

Cape Canaveral is run by a Council-Manager government. The City Council consists of 5 members, including the Mayor. All seats on the City Council are filled by nonpartisan election as outlined in the City Charter.[8] The City Manager is an appointed position that acts as the city's administrative leader and carries out the council's acts and directives.[9]

  • Mayor - Rocky Randels
  • Mayor Pro Tem - Robert "Bob" Hoog
  • Councilmember - Buzz Petsos
  • Councilmember - Shannon Roberts
  • Councilmember - Betty Walsh
  • City Manager - Bennett Boucher
  • City Clerk - Susan Stills, CMC

In 2007, the city had a taxable real estate base of $1.46 billion.[10]

Demographics

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 8,829 people, 5,066 households, and 2,097 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,463.0/km² (3,788.0/mi²). There were 6,641 housing units at an average density of 1,100.5/km² (2,849.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.68% White, 1.43% African American, 0.32% Native American, 1.70% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.42% from other races, and 1.40% from two or more races. Out of all of which Hispanics or Latinos of constituted 3.48% of the population, regardless of race.

There were 5,066 households out of which 11.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 30.7% were married couples living together, 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 58.6% were non-families. 47.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.74 and the average family size was 2.41.

In the city the population was spread out with 11.3% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 30.4% from 25 to 44, 28.8% from 45 to 64, and 23.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46 years. For every 100 females there were 109.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 107.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,858, and the median income for a family was $43,109. Males had a median income of $33,571 versus $22,423 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,537. About 9.2% of families and 11.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.7% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

Cape Canaveral is mostly residential. Many people work at NASA on the space shuttle to the north but a great number of people work in service industry.

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Workforce

In 2007, the average size of Cape Canaveral's labor force was 5,824. Of that group, 5,533 were employed and 291 were unemployed, for an unemployment rate of 5%.[11]

Housing

In 2008, no building permits were issued. This was down from 5 permits for 6 units in 2007, which was down from 19 permits for 42 units in 2006.[12]

The median home price in 2007 was $215,000.[11]

Transportation

The primary transportation is by road.

Florida A1A.svg SR A1A is the major road, running north-south within the city.

Florida 528.svg To the north of Cape Canaveral, SR 528 heads east, connecting the city to Merritt Island, the mainland, and Orlando.

Florida 520.svg To the south of Cape Canaveral, SR 520 provides a similar eastward route, but while 528 is an freeway, 520 has many stop lights and intersections.

A group of east-west roads are named for Presidents starting with Washington in the north of town to Harding in the south and skipping redundant last named presidencies of the second Adams and the second Harrison.[13]

Public transportation is provided by Space Coast Area Transit. The #9 Beach Trolley bus line circles through Cape Canaveral and runs down to Cocoa Beach and connects with other SCAT bus lines serving Brevard County, Florida.[14]

Port Canaveral serves the region as a world-class deep-water cargo and cruise port.

Sister cities

Cape Canaveral has four sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International:

References

  1. ^ a b "Annual Estimates of the population for the Incorporated Places of Florida" (CSV). US Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/popest/cities/tables/SUB-EST2008-04-12.csv. Retrieved 2009-06-24.  
  2. ^ "Annual Estimates of the population for Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas" (CSV). US Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/popest/metro/tables/2008/CBSA-EST2008-01.csv. Retrieved 2009-06-24.  
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  
  5. ^ "Spaceline: History of Cape Canaveral B.C.-1948". http://www.spaceline.org/capehistory/1a.html. Retrieved 2008-08-31.  
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2005-05-03. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  
  7. ^ City History City of Cape Canaveral - Official Site. Retrieved on 2009-06-25.
  8. ^ Elected Officials City of Cape Canaveral Official Site. Retrieved on 2009-06-25.
  9. ^ City Manager City of Cape Canaveral - Official Site. Retrieved on 2009-06-25.
  10. ^ Dean, James (April 26, 2008). More taxes or fewer services. Florida Today.  
  11. ^ a b Cape Canaveral Community Data Sheet Economic Development Council of Florida's Space Coast. Retrieved on 2009-06-25.
  12. ^ Building Permits United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2009-06-25.
  13. ^ Mapquest accessed March 12, 2008
  14. ^ [1]

External links


Cape Canaveral, Florida
—  City  —
Coordinates: 28°23′18″N 80°36′13″W / 28.38833°N 80.60361°W / 28.38833; -80.60361Coordinates: 28°23′18″N 80°36′13″W / 28.38833°N 80.60361°W / 28.38833; -80.60361
Country  United States
State  Florida
County  Brevard
Incorporated 1963
Government
 - Type Council-Manager
 - Mayor Rocky Randels
 - City Manager Bennett Boucher
 - Mayor Pro Tem Robert "Bob" Hoog
Area
 - City 2.3 sq mi (6 km2)
 - Land 2.3 sq mi (6 km2)
 - Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 10 ft (3 m)
Population (1 July 2008)[1][2]
 - City 10,147
 Density 4,411.7/sq mi (1,691.2/km2)
 Metro 536,521
  Census Bureau estimate
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 32920
Area code(s) 321
FIPS code 12-10250[3]
GNIS feature ID 0279995[4]
Website www.cityofcapecanaveral.org

Cape Canaveral is a city in Brevard County, Florida, United States. The population was 8,829 at the 2000 census. As of 2008, the estimated population according to the U.S. Census Bureau was 10,147.[1] It is part of the Palm BayMelbourneTitusville Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

Geography

The city of Cape Canaveral is located at the northern tip of a barrier island on the Atlantic coast of Florida. It is due south of the geographical feature Cape Canaveral (known as Cape Kennedy from 1963 to 1973). It is separated from the mainland by the Banana River, Merritt Island and the Indian River from east to west.[5] Port Canaveral is an important port for cruise liners, which take on passengers here for cruises to the Caribbean.

Cape Canaveral is located at 28°23′18″N 80°36′13″W / 28.388382°N 80.603498°W / 28.388382; -80.603498.[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.1 km² (2.3 mi²). 6.0 km² (2.3 mi²) of it is land and 0.1 km² (0.04 mi²) of it (0.85%) is water.

Climate

On August 20, 2008, Tropical Storm Fay dropped 20.03 inches (50.9 cm).[7]

History

The first permanent settlement in present day Brevard was, without a doubt, established near Cape Canaveral in 1848.[8] After the establishment of a lighthouse, a few families moved in and a small, but stable settlement was born. Gradually, as the threat of Seminole Indian attacks was becoming increasingly unlikely, people began to move into the area around the Indian River.

In the early 1920s, a group of Orlando journalists invested more than $150,000 in the beach acreage that now encompasses the area of presidentially-named streets in Cape Canaveral. They called their development Journalista (now Avon-by-the-Sea) in honor of their trade. This seasonal retreat for inland residents was anticipated to become as popular a resort area as Cocoa Beach to the south, due to the construction of wooden bridge connecting Merritt Island to the area.

At that time, fishermen, retirees, and descendants of Captain Mills Burnham—the original official keeper of the Cape Canaveral Light—resided in the northern part of the present city. They owned acreage named Artesia that occupied the area that is now Port Canaveral.

Due to the hardships caused by the Great Depression, many investors defaulted on their holdings. Much of this land was recovered by newspaper owner R.B. Brossier and his son, Dickson, after they sold their Orlando home and used the remaining $4,500 to purchase much of the Avon area. It was their dream that a port would be developed and a direct route to Orlando would be constructed.

By 1958 the area had grown with the Space Program. At that time, an adjacent city could annex an unincorporated area without a vote of the residents, so property owners were discussing the feasibility of forming a new city to prevent possible annexation by the City of Cocoa Beach. Landowners were asked for their opinion on this matter, and, due to substantial city debt and land taxes, most residents preferred not to become part of Cocoa Beach. So it was decided that the time was right to pursue incorporation and create a city of their own.[9]

Government

Cape Canaveral is run by a Council-Manager government. The City Council consists of 5 members, including the mayor. All seats on the City Council are filled by nonpartisan election as outlined in the City Charter.[10] The City Manager is an appointed position that acts as the city's administrative leader and carries out the council's acts and directives.[11]

  • Mayor - Rocky Randels
  • Councilmember - Robert "Bob" Hoog
  • Mayor Pro Tem - Buzz Petsos
  • Councilmember - Shannon Roberts
  • Councilmember - Betty Walsh
  • City Manager (appointed) - David Greene
  • City Clerk (appointed) - Angela Apperson, CMC

In 2007, the city had a taxable real estate base of $1.46 billion.[12]

Federally, Cape Canaveral is part of Florida's 15th congressional district, represented by Republican Bill Posey, elected in 2008.

Demographics

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 8,829 people, 5,066 households, and 2,097 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,463.0/km² (3,788.0/mi²). There were 6,641 housing units at an average density of 1,100.5/km² (2,849.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.68% White, 1.43% African American, 0.32% Native American, 1.70% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.42% from other races, and 1.40% from two or more races. Out of all of which Hispanics or Latinos of constituted 3.48% of the population, regardless of race.

There were 5,066 households out of which 11.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 30.7% were married couples living together, 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 58.6% were non-families. 47.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.74 and the average family size was 2.41.

In the city the population was spread out with 11.3% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 30.4% from 25 to 44, 28.8% from 45 to 64, and 23.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46 years. For every 100 females there were 109.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 107.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,858, and the median income for a family was $43,109. Males had a median income of $33,571 versus $22,423 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,537. About 9.2% of families and 11.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.7% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

Cape Canaveral is mostly residential. Many residents work in the service industry and at the Kennedy Space Center to the north.[citation needed]

Workforce

In 2007, the average size of Cape Canaveral's labor force was 5,824. Of that group, 5,533 were employed and 291 were unemployed, for an unemployment rate of 5%.[13]

Housing

In 2008, no building permits were issued. This was down from 5 permits for 6 units in 2007, which was down from 19 permits for 42 units in 2006.[14]

The median home price in 2007 was $215,000.[13]

Tourism

Tourism is a major part of the economy as in any Florida beachside community. The largest hotel in Brevard is located in the city. It has 284 rooms and 30,000 square feet (2,800 m2) of meeting space.[15]

Transportation

The primary transportation is by road.

File:Florida SR A1A is the major road, running north-south within the city.

File:Florida To the north of Cape Canaveral, SR 528 heads east, connecting the city to Merritt Island, the mainland, and Orlando.

File:Florida To the south of Cape Canaveral, SR 520 provides a similar eastward route, but while 528 is an freeway, 520 has many stop lights and intersections.

A group of east-west roads are named for Presidents starting with Washington in the north of town to Harding in the south and skipping redundant last named presidencies of the second Adams and the second Harrison.[16]

Public transportation is provided by Space Coast Area Transit. The #9 Beach Trolley bus line circles through Cape Canaveral and runs down to Cocoa Beach and connects with other SCAT bus lines serving Brevard County, Florida.[17]

Port Canaveral serves the region as a world-class deep-water cargo and cruise port.

Notable residents

Sister cities

Cape Canaveral has four sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International:

References

  1. ^ a b "Annual Estimates of the population for the Incorporated Places of Florida" (CSV). US Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/popest/cities/tables/SUB-EST2008-04-12.csv. Retrieved 2009-06-24. 
  2. ^ "Annual Estimates of the population for Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas" (CSV). US Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/popest/metro/tables/2008/CBSA-EST2008-01.csv. Retrieved 2009-06-24. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "Spaceline: History of Cape Canaveral B.C.-1948". http://www.spaceline.org/capehistory/1a.html. Retrieved 2008-08-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2005-05-03. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "Tropical Storm Fay continues to drift west". Florida Today. Florida Today. 2008-08-21. http://www.floridatoday.com/article/20080821/BREAKINGNEWS/308210003/Tropical-Storm-Fay-continues-to-drift-west. 
  8. ^ "Historic Brevard Landmark guide". Brevard County Historical Commission. http://www.brevardcounty.us/history/documents/LandmarkGuide2010.pdf. Retrieved 2010-09-15. 
  9. ^ City History City of Cape Canaveral - Official Site. Retrieved on 2009-06-25.
  10. ^ Elected Officials City of Cape Canaveral Official Site. Retrieved on 2009-06-25.
  11. ^ City Manager City of Cape Canaveral - Official Site. Retrieved on 2009-06-25.
  12. ^ Dean, James (April 26, 2008). More taxes or fewer services. Florida Today. 
  13. ^ a b Cape Canaveral Community Data Sheet Economic Development Council of Florida's Space Coast. Retrieved on 2009-06-25.
  14. ^ Building Permits United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2009-06-25.
  15. ^ Price, Wayne T. (28 February 2010). "As Orlando slumps, so does Brevard". Melbourne, Florida: Florida Today. pp. 3E. 
  16. ^ Mapquest accessed March 12, 2008
  17. ^ [1]

External links


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