Capital One Bowl: Wikis

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Capital One Bowl
"Little Bowl with the Big Heart"
CapitalOneBowlLogo.png
Capital One Bowl logo
Stadium Citrus Bowl
Location Orlando, Florida
Previous Stadiums Florida Field (1973)
Previous Locations Gainesville, Florida (1973)
Operated 1947-present
Conference Tie-ins Big Ten, SEC
Previous Conference Tie-ins OVC (1947-1967)
MAC (1968-1975)
SoCon (1968-1972)
SEC (1972-1973)
ACC (1987-1991)
Payout US$4,250,000 (As of 2006)
Sponsors
Florida Citrus Growers Association (1983-2002)
CompUSA (1994-1999)
Ourhouse.com (2000)
Capital One (2001-present)
Former names
Tangerine Bowl (1947-1982)
Florida Citrus Bowl (1983-1993)
CompUSA Florida Citrus Bowl (1994-1999)
Ourhouse.com Florida Citrus Bowl (2000)
Capital One Florida Citrus Bowl (2001-2002)
2010 Matchup
Penn State vs. LSU (PSU 19-17)
2011 Matchup
SEC vs. Big Ten (January 1)

The Capital One Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played in Orlando, Florida at the Citrus Bowl, and previously known as the Tangerine Bowl (1947-1982) and the Florida Citrus Bowl (1983-2002). Financial services company Capital One has been the title sponsor of the bowl since 2001 when it was the Capital One Florida Citrus Bowl but with the exclusive Capital One Bowl moniker since 2003. The bowl is operated by Florida Citrus Sports, a non-profit group which also organizes the Champs Sports Bowl and Florida Classic.

Since becoming one of the premier bowls, the Capital One Bowl is traditionally held at 1 p.m. EST on New Year's Day, immediately before the Rose Bowl, both of which will be televised on ESPN starting in 2011. In 2004, the Capital One Bowl bid to become the fifth BCS game, but was not chosen, primarily due to the stadium's aging condition. On July 26, 2007 the Orange County Commissioners voted 5–2 in favor of spending a total of 1.1 billion dollars on building a new arena for the Orlando Magic, building a performing arts center and upgrading the Citrus Bowl.

Currently, the bowl has tie-ins with the SEC and the Big Ten holding the first selection after the BCS for both conferences. As of 2006 it has the largest payout of all the non-BCS bowls at $4.25M per team.[1]

Contents

History

The game is one of the oldest of the non-BCS bowls, next to the Gator Bowl, Cotton Bowl Classic and Sun Bowl, beginning play in 1947. The first game played before an estimated crowd of 9,000. By 1952, the game was dubbed the "Little Bowl with the Big Heart," because all the proceeds from the game went to charity. Before 1968 the game featured matchups between schools throughout the South, often featuring the Ohio Valley Conference champion or other small colleges (though a few major colleges did play in the bowl during this early era as well). After becoming a major college bowl game, from 1968 through 1975 the bowl featured the Mid-American Conference champion against an opponent from the Southern Conference (through 1972), the SEC (1972–1973) or an at-large opponent (1975). As the major football conferences relaxed restrictions on post-season play in the mid-1970s, the game went to a matchup between two at-large teams from major conferences, with one school typically (but not always) from the South. From 1987 to 1991 it featured the ACC Champion against an at large opponent. Since 1992, the game has featured one of the top teams from the Big Ten and the SEC.

In 1986, it was one of the bowl games considered for the site of the "winner take all" national championship game between Penn State and Miami before the Fiesta Bowl was eventually chosen.

The 1991 game featured National Championship implications. Georgia Tech won the Florida Citrus Bowl, finished 11–0–1, and were voted the 1990 UPI national champion.

The 1998 game, which featured nearby Florida beating Penn State, holds the game's attendance record at 72,940. During the 1990s, the second place finisher in the SEC typically went to this bowl. Florida coach Steve Spurrier, speaking to the fact the University of Tennessee occupied that spot three of four years as Florida finished first, famously quipped "You can't spell Citrus without U-T!" Ironically, the next season Tennessee went 13-0 and won the first BCS National Championship, sending the Gators to the Citrus Bowl.

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Racial integration

In 1955, the Hillsdale Dales/Chargers team under head coach Muddy Waters refused to play in the game despite their 9–0 record because game officials prohibited the team's black players from participating in the game.[citation needed]

The University at Buffalo's first bowl bid was to the Tangerine Bowl in 1958. The team unanimously voted to skip the bowl because the team's two black players would not have been allowed on the field. Buffalo would not be bowl eligible for another 50 years. During the 2008 season, when the Bulls were on the verge of bowl eligibility, the 1958 team was profiled on ESPN's Outside the Lines.[2] The 2008 team went on to win the Mid-American Conference title, and lost to University of Connecticut 38-20 in the International Bowl.

In 1966, Morgan State, of Baltimore, Maryland under head coach Earl C. Banks a member of the NCAA College Football Hall of Fame, became the first historically black college (HBCU) to play in and win the Tangerine Bowl game by defeating West Chester State {Pa.}, finishing the season undefeated for the second straight year.

Gainesville

In early 1973, construction improvements were planned for the then 17,000-seat Tangerine Bowl stadium to expand to over 51,000 seats. In early summer 1973, however, construction was stalled due to legal concerns, and the improvements were delayed. Late in the 1973 college football season, Tangerine Bowl President Will Gieger and other officials planned to invite Miami (Ohio) and East Carolina to Orlando for the game. On November 19, 1973, East Carolina withdrew its interests, and the bowl was left with one at-large bid. In an unexpected, and unprecedented move, game officials decided to invite the Florida Gators, and move the game to Florida Field in Gainesville, their home stadium. The larger stadium would be needed to accommodate the large crowd expected. The move required special permission from the NCAA, and special accommodations were made. Both teams would be headquartered in Orlando, Florida for the week, and spend most of their time there, including practices. The teams were bused up to Gainesville, and at gametime, a near-record low temperature of -4 degrees Celsius (25 degrees Fahrenheit) greeted the participants. Despite the home-field advantage, in the game nicknamed the "Transplant Bowl," Miami defeated the Gators 16–7.

The one-time moving of the game, and the fears of a permanent relocation, rejuvenated the stalled stadium renovations in Orlando. The game returned to Orlando for 1974, and within a couple years, the expansion project was complete.

Mascot contest

Capital One also sponsors the annual "Mascot of the Year" contest.[3] Fans are invited to vote for their favorite college mascot. Each year, several mascots from various Division I FBS/FCS schools are nominated to "play" a simulated 10-week season. The mascot with the best record will be declared the winner and is honored at halftime on the game telecast on ABC.

The winning school is awarded $10,000 towards their mascot program.

Past winners

Game results

Italics denote a tie game.

Season Date Played Winning Team Losing Team
1946 January 1, 1947 Catawba 31 Maryville 0
1947 January 1, 1948 Catawba 7 Marshall 0
1948 January 1, 1949 Murray State 21 Sul Ross State 21
1949 January 2, 1950 St. Vincent 7 Emory & Henry 6
1950 January 1, 1951 Morris Harvey 35 Emory & Henry 14
1951 January 1, 1952 Stetson 35 Arkansas State 20
1952 January 1, 1953 East Texas State 33 Tennessee Tech 0
1953 January 1, 1954 Arkansas State 7 East Texas State 7
1954 January 1, 1955 Omaha 7 Eastern Kentucky 6
1955 January 2, 1956 Juniata 6 Missouri Valley 6
1956 January 1, 1957 West Texas 20 Southern Miss 13
1957 January 1, 1958 East Texas State 10 Southern Miss 9
1958 December 27, 1958 East Texas State 26 Missouri Valley 7
1959 January 1, 1960 Middle Tennessee 21 Presbyterian 12
1960 December 30, 1960 The Citadel 27 Tennessee Tech 0
1961 December 29, 1961 Lamar 21 Middle Tennessee 14
1962 December 22, 1962 Houston 49 Miami (Ohio) 21
1963 December 28, 1963 Western Kentucky 27 Coast Guard 0
1964 December 12, 1964 East Carolina 14 Massachusetts 13
1965 December 11, 1965 East Carolina 31 Maine 0
1966 December 10, 1966 Morgan State 14 West Chester 6
1967 December 16, 1967 UT Martin 25 West Chester 8
1968 December 27, 1968 Richmond 49 Ohio 42
1969 December 26, 1969 Toledo 56 Davidson 33
1970 December 28, 1970 Toledo 40 William & Mary 12
1971 December 28, 1971 Toledo 28 Richmond 3
1972 December 29, 1972 Tampa 21 Kent State 18
1973 December 22, 1973 Miami (Ohio) 16 Florida 7
1974 December 21, 1974 Miami (Ohio) 21 Georgia 10
1975 December 20, 1975 Miami (Ohio) 20 South Carolina 7
1976 December 18, 1976 Oklahoma State 49 BYU 21
1977 December 23, 1977 Florida State 40 Texas Tech 17
1978 December 23, 1978 NC State 30 Pittsburgh 17
1979 December 22, 1979 LSU 34 Wake Forest 10
1980 December 20, 1980 Florida 35 Maryland 20
1981 December 19, 1981 Missouri 19 Southern Miss 17
1982 December 18, 1982 Auburn 33 Boston College 26
1983 December 17, 1983 Tennessee 30 Maryland 23
1984 December 22, 1984 Florida State 17 Georgia 17
1985 December 28, 1985 Ohio State 10 BYU 7
1986 January 1, 1987 Auburn 16 USC 7
1987 January 1, 1988 Clemson 35 Penn State 10
1988 January 2, 1989 Clemson 13 Oklahoma 6
1989 January 1, 1990 Illinois 31 Virginia 21
1990 January 1, 1991 Georgia Tech 45 Nebraska 21
1991 January 1, 1992 California 37 Clemson 13
1992 January 1, 1993 Georgia 21 Ohio State 14
1993 January 1, 1994 Penn State 31 Tennessee 13
1994 January 2, 1995 Alabama 24 Ohio State 17
1995 January 1, 1996 Tennessee 20 Ohio State 14
1996 January 1, 1997 Tennessee 48 Northwestern 28
1997 January 1, 1998 Florida 21 Penn State 6
1998 January 1, 1999 Michigan 45 Arkansas 31
1999 January 1, 2000 Michigan State 37 Florida 34
2000 January 1, 2001 Michigan 31 Auburn 28
2001 January 1, 2002 Tennessee 45 Michigan 17
2002 January 1, 2003 Auburn 13 Penn State 9
2003 January 1, 2004 Georgia 34 Purdue 27 (OT)
2004 January 1, 2005 Iowa 30 LSU 25
2005 January 2, 2006 Wisconsin 24 Auburn 10
2006 January 1, 2007 Wisconsin 17 Arkansas 14
2007 January 1, 2008 Michigan 41 Florida 35
2008 January 1, 2009 Georgia 24 Michigan State 12
2009 January 1, 2010 Penn State 19 LSU 17

MVPs

Date played MVP(s) Team Position
January 1, 1949 Dale McDaniels Murray State NL
Ted Scown Sul Ross State NL
January 2, 1950 Don Heinigan St. Vincent NL
Chick Davis Emory & Henry QB
January 1, 1951 Pete Anania Morris Harvey NL
Charles Hubbard Morris Harvey NL
January 1, 1952 Bill Johnson Stetson NL
Dave Laude Stetson NL
January 1, 1953 Marvin Brown East Texas State NL
January 1, 1954 Billy Ray Norris East Texas State NL
Bobby Spann Arkansas State NL
January 1, 1955 Bill Englehardt Omaha NL
January 2, 1956 Barry Drexler Juniata NL
January 1, 1957 Ron Mills West Texas State NL
January 1, 1958 Garry Berry East Texas State NL
Neal Hinson East Texas State NL
December 27, 1958 Sam McCord East Texas State NL
January 1, 1960 Bucky Pitts Middle Tennessee NL
Bob Waters Presbyterian NL
December 30, 1960 Jerry Nettles Citadel NL
December 29, 1961 Windell Hebert Lamar QB
December 22, 1962 Joe Lopasky Houston NL
Billy Rolands Houston NL
December 28, 1963 Sharon Miller Western Kentucky NL
December 12, 1964 Bill Cline East Carolina NL
Jerry Whelchel Massachusetts NL
December 11, 1965 Dave Alexander East Carolina NL
December 10, 1966 Willie Lanier Morgan State NL
December 16, 1967 Errol Hook Tennessee-Martin NL
Gordon Lambert Tennessee-Martin NL
December 27, 1968 Buster O'Brien Richmond B
Walker Gillette Richmond L
December 26, 1969 Chuck Ealey Toledo QB
Dan Crockett Toledo L
December 28, 1970 Chuck Ealey Toledo QB
Vince Hublen William & Mary L
December 28, 1971 Chuck Ealey Toledo QB
Mel Long Toledo L
December 29, 1972 Freddie Solomon Tampa B
Jack Lambert Kent State L
December 22, 1973 Chuck Varner Miami B
Brad Cousino Miami B
December 21, 1974 Sherman Smith Miami B
Brad Cousino Miami L
John Roudebush Miami L
December 20, 1975 Rob Carpenter Miami B
Jeff Kelly Miami L
December 18, 1976 Terry Miller Oklahoma State B
Phillip Dokes Oklahoma State L
December 23, 1977 Jimmy Jordan Florida State QB
December 23, 1978 Ted Brown North Carolina State RB
December 22, 1979 David Woodley LSU QB
December 20, 1980 Cris Collinsworth Florida WR
December 19, 1981 Jeff Gaylord Missouri LB
December 18, 1982 Randy Campbell Auburn QB
December 17, 1983 Johnnie Jones Tennessee RB
December 22, 1984 James Jackson Georgia QB
December 28, 1985 Larry Kolic Ohio State LB
January 1, 1987 Aundray Bruce Auburn LB
January 1, 1988 Rodney Williams Clemson QB
January 2, 1989 Terry Allen Clemson RB
January 1, 1990 Jeff George Illinois QB
January 1, 1991 Shawn Jones Georgia Tech QB
January 1, 1992 Mike Pawlawski California QB
January 1, 1993 Garrison Hearst Georgia RB
January 1, 1994 Bobby Engram Penn State WR
January 2, 1995 Sherman Williams Alabama RB
January 1, 1996 Jay Graham Tennessee RB
January 1, 1997 Peyton Manning Tennessee QB
January 1, 1998 Fred Taylor Florida RB
January 1, 1999 Anthony Thomas Michigan RB
January 1, 2000 Plaxico Burress Michigan State WR
January 1, 2001 Anthony Thomas Michigan RB
January 1, 2002 Casey Clausen Tennessee QB
January 1, 2003 Ronnie Brown Auburn RB
January 1, 2004 David Greene Georgia QB
January 1, 2005 Drew Tate Iowa QB
January 2, 2006 Brian Calhoun Wisconsin RB
January 1, 2007 John Stocco Wisconsin QB
January 1, 2008 Chad Henne Michigan QB
January 1, 2009 Matt Stafford Georgia QB
January 1, 2010 Daryll Clark Penn State QB

Most appearances

Rank Team Appearances Record
T1 Georgia 5 3-1-1
T1 Tennessee 5 3-2
T1 Florida 5 2-3
T1 Penn State 5 2-3
T5 East Texas State 4 3-1
T5 Miami (Ohio) 4 3-1
T5 Michigan 4 3-1
T5 Auburn 4 2-2
T9 Toledo 3 3-0
T9 Clemson 3 2-1
T9 LSU 3 1-2
T9 Ohio State 4 1-3
T9 Southern Miss 3 0-3

Broadcasting

ABC televised the game from 1987-2010, with NBC airing it in 1984-85 and the syndicated Mizlou Television Network doing so prior to 1984. Starting with the January 1, 2011 game, the broadcast will shift to ESPN. The game will continue to serve as a lead-in to the Rose Bowl, which also will move to ESPN.

Radio broadcast rights for the game are currently held by Sports USA Radio Network. The Capital One Bowl, known prior to 2003 as the Florida Citrus Bowl (1983-2002) and the Tangerine Bowl (1947-1982), has been televised by ABC since 1987. Prior to that the game was televised by NBC in 1984 and 1985, and before that by the syndicated Mizlou Television Network.

Date Network Play-by-play announcers Color commentators Sideline reporters
January 1, 2010 ABC[4] Brad Nessler Todd Blackledge Erin Andrews
January 1, 2009 ABC Mike Patrick Todd Blackledge Holly Rowe
January 1, 2008 ABC Mike Patrick Todd Blackledge Holly Rowe
January 1, 2007[5] ABC Brad Nessler Bob Griese and Paul Maguire Erin Andrews
January 2, 2006[6] ABC Ron Franklin Bob Davie Holly Rowe
January 2, 2005[7] ABC Gary Thorne Ed Cunningham Jerry Punch
January 1, 2004[8] ABC Gary Thorne David Norrie Jerry Punch
January 1, 2003 ABC Sean McDonough David Norrie
January 1, 2001 ABC Sean Grande David Norrie Chip Tarkenton
January 1, 2000[9] ABC Brent Musburger Gary Danielson Jack Arute
January 1, 1999 ABC[10] Terry Gannon Tim Brant Dean Blevins
January 1, 1998 ABC Terry Gannon Tim Brant
January 1, 1997 ABC Mark Jones John Spagnola
January 1, 1995 ABC Mark Jones Tim Brant
January 2, 1994 ABC Mark Jones Tim Brant John Spagnola
January 1, 1993 ABC Brent Musburger Dick Vermeil
January 1, 1991 ABC Brent Musburger Dick Vermeil Mark Jones and Cheryl Miller
January 1, 1990 ABC Gary Bender Dick Vermeil
January 1, 1989 ABC Gary Bender Dick Vermeil Becky Dixon
January 2, 1988 ABC Gary Bender Lynn Swann Steve Alvarez
January 1, 1987 ABC Frank Gifford Lynn Swann Mike Adamle
December 28, 1985 NBC Jay Randolph Dave Rowe
December 22, 1984 NBC Jay Randolph Dave Rowe
December 18, 1982 Mizolu Howard David Danny Abramowicz Steve Grad and Mike Hogewood

See also

External links

References


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