The Full Wiki

Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse: Wikis

  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse
Cv3 na box.jpg
North American boxart
Developer(s) Konami
Publisher(s) Konami (Japan / US)
Palcom (Europe)
Designer(s) H. Akamatsu
Composer(s) Yoshinori Sasaki

Jun Funahashi

Yukie Morimoto

Series Castlevania
Platform(s) NES/Famicom
Release date(s) NES
JP December 22, 1989
NA September 1, 1990
EU December 10, 1992
Virtual Console
JP April 21, 2009
NA January 12, 2009
PAL October 31, 2008
Genre(s) Platformer
Mode(s) Single-player
Rating(s) ESRB: E (PC & VC versions)
PEGI: 7+
Media 3-megabit cartridge

Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse (悪魔城伝説 Akumajō Densetsu, ? "Legend of the Devil's Castle") is the third and final Castlevania video game produced for the Nintendo Entertainment System. It was published by Konami in Japan in 1989, in North America in 1990, and in Europe in 1992 (sometime after the European release of Super Castlevania IV). It was later released on the Wii Virtual Console in the PAL regions on October 31, 2008, in North America on January 12, 2009 and in Japan on April 21, 2009.

The plot of Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse is a prequel to the original Castlevania (much like the earlier Game Boy game Castlevania: The Adventure) set a few centuries before the events of the original game. The game's protagonist is Trevor C. Belmont, an ancestor of the original hero Simon Belmont.

Contents

Gameplay

Castlevania III abandons the adventure game elements of its immediate predecessor and returns to the platform game roots of the first Castlevania title. Unlike Castlevania, however, Castlevania III is not strictly linear: Trevor, the main character, can be assisted by one of three possible assistant characters, and after completing the first level, and at several other points throughout the game, the player is given a choice of paths to follow. The choices made by the player in these circumstances can have a profound impact on how the game unfolds. There are 15 stages in total.

There are two main routes through the game's fifteen stages. The second stage is an optional excursion for picking up one of the three partner characters, and the main branch occurs part way through the third stage. Each route contains total of nine stages (ten if the player takes the optional second stage). The upper route takes the player across the lake to the main bridge, entering Dracula's castle through the front gate, and is generally regarded as the easier of the two routes. The lower route takes the player through a series of underground tunnels and cavernous areas, eventually scaling the cliff side below the castle, and is generally considered more difficult than the upper route. The lower route also features one short branching section of its own at stage 6. The two paths converge in the main hall of the castle.

Plot

Castlevania series fictional chronology

1094 - Lament of Innocence
1476 - Dracula's Curse
1479 - Curse of Darkness
1591 - The Adventure (ReBirth)
1606 - Belmont's Revenge
1600s - Order of Shadows
1691 - Castlevania (Vampire Killer, Super, Chronicles)
1698 - Simon's Quest
1748 - Harmony of Dissonance
1792 - Rondo of Blood
1797 - Symphony of the Night
1800s - Order of Ecclesia
1830 - Circle of the Moon
1844 - Legacy of Darkness
1852 - Castlevania (Nintendo 64)
1917 - Bloodlines
1944 - Portrait of Ruin
2035 - Aria of Sorrow
2036 - Dawn of Sorrow

Alternate timeline and/or universe
Legends
Lords of Shadow


The year is 1476, and Count Dracula has started to ravage Europe with an army of monsters. The Belmont family of vampire hunters, once exiled from Wallachia, are called into action by the Church. They feared the Belmonts' "super-human" power, but with Dracula menacing to swallow Europe in darkness, they are left with no choice but to call Trevor Belmont, current wielder of the Vampire Killer Whip.

Joining Trevor Belmont in his mission to defeat Dracula are three new playable characters: Sypha Belnades, a young priestess with poor physical attack power but powerful elemental magic spells at her disposal;[1] Grant DaNasty, a pirate with the ability to climb on walls and change direction in mid-jump (a rare ability in earlier games of the series); and Alucard, Dracula's son, a dhampir with the ability to shoot fireballs and transform into a bat. Trevor can be accompanied by only one companion at a time. If he chooses to take on another he must abandon his current companion. And the player can "spiritually transform" between Trevor and his ally with the "select" button. Both Trevor and whoever is accompanying him share the same health meter. The ending of the game differs depending on which companion Trevor has with him at the time, or if he does not take another character with him at all.

Development

Castlevania III was the first game to use Konami's VRC6 chip, which is included in the cartridge to provide the console more capabilities. The VRC6 chip primarily added three audio channels to the system—allowing the game to use six audio channels—as well as provide smoother animation for sprites. The game's audio programmer, Hidenori Maezawa, assisted in the chip's creation. The North American release replaced the VRC6 with Nintendo's Memory Management Controller (MMC) chip, specifically the MMC5 model. The MMC5 chip lacked the extra audio channels, and the game's music had to be downgraded to comply with the NES's standard three channels.[2]

Version differences

Besides just the different name in Japan, Akumajō Densetsu, the Japanese version has several other differences:

  • Instead of using a stabbing dagger, Grant throws daggers as his main attack.
  • In the North American and European versions, each enemy takes away the same amount of energy when the player is hit. But as the game progresses, damage taken from enemies increases (capping off at 4/5 bars, depending on the player character, in the North American version, and 3/4 bars in the European version), Instead, in the Japanese game, each enemy takes a different amount of energy away from the player. Many fans believe this factor makes the Japanese version easier.
  • On the final stage, if the player dies while fighting Dracula, instead of starting back at the level's second section, the player begins right outside of Dracula's keep (as in the original Castlevania). This is another factor said to make the Japanese version easier.
  • The game's font is different between versions, with the Japanese version using the same font as the original Castlevania--a standard video-game font used in many other old games--and the western versions using a Gothic-style font (with some similarities).
  • Medusa has female breasts in the Japanese game which were altered in the North American and European releases to resemble a more masculine chest. The female statues in stage 8 are partially nude in the Japanese version. The statues were clothed for the North American and European releases.
  • The flea men in the Japanese game are hopping gremlin creatures.
  • Several enemies are colored differently, have altered sprites, or have slightly different attack patterns, including the zombies in the first stage.
  • Several stages have different color palettes than the Japanese version.
  • The original Japanese version contained a specialized "VRC6" music microprocessor chip which was removed in the North American and European releases. This chip added two extra pulse-wave channels and a saw-wave channel to the system's initial set of five channels. The majority of the music combines the channels to imitate the sound of a synthesized string section. See: Multi-Memory Controller. The reason for this removal was that the western versions of the NES didn't have the ability to support external sound chips, so the game was re-programmed for the western releases. Some of the percussion instruments were also slightly changed, even though the low-quality PCM channel was no less capable without the VRC6 mapper.
  • The Japanese version had slightly better graphics than the North American version. The backgrounds in many stages had special effects not seen in the North American and European releases, also due to the lack of the special mapper chip found in the Japanese cartridge (which was manufactured not by Nintendo, but by Konami itself).
  • Like Simon's Quest before it, religious imagery once again appears uncensored in the North American and PAL versions. The only difference is that the cross in the opening scene has bursts of rays around it in the Japanese version.
  • In the Japanese version, Trevor Belmont is named Ralph Belmondo.
  • In Stage 9, the background music "Riddle" repeats its first section once in the Japanese version.
  • The North American and PAL versions have several hidden features that can be accessed by entering a certain name for the player, which include starting the game with 10 lives as well as when restarting after a game over, the option to start the game with any of the three spirit partners, and to access the second, more difficult quest. These features are not present in the Japanese version.

Audio

Akumajō Dracula Best Vol. 1
Soundtrack by Kinuyo Yamashita, Kenichi Matsubara, Yoshinori Sasaki, Jun Funahashi & Yukie Morimoto
Released September 23, 1998 (Japan)
Genre Video game soundtrack
Length 1:04:00

Track listing

Reception and legacy

A Castlevania anime movie is in development based on Dracula's Curse, and may be split into three parts. It is being written by Warren Ellis and art directed by James Jean and is continued in 2005's Castlevania: Curse of Darkness, taking place in 1479, also featuring Trevor Belmont as a playable character. [3]

Many of the sprites in Super Castlevania IV are based on those used in Castlevania III. Some gameplay characteristics (such as the ability to stand on top of the spike traps) were carried over as well.

References

External links


Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

Castlevania: Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse
Box artwork for Castlevania: Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse.
Developer(s) Konami
Publisher(s) Konami
Release date(s)
NES
Wii Virtual Console
Genre(s) Action-adventure
System(s) NES, GameTap, Wii Virtual Console
Preceded by Castlevania II: Simon's Quest
Followed by Super Castlevania IV
Series Castlevania

Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse (often referred to simply as Dracula's Curse and called Demon Castle Legends in some regions) , was the third Castlevania game released by Konami for the Nintendo Entertainment System. While the previous game was radically different than the first game, this one was very much like the original.

The game stars Trevor Belmont and chronologically is the first game after Lament of Innocence. Trevor will be accompanied by Alcuard, the son of Dracula, Sypha Belnades, a witch captured by Dracula, and Grant DaNasty, ghost of a pirate killed by Dracula. The gameplay is significantly different than the original as there are multiple paths to get from the start to Dracula's castle. The routes vary significantly in difficulty, allowing the player to choose how hard the game is as they play.

Table of Contents

Getting Started
  • Items
  • Characters
  • Enemies
  • Bosses
Appendices
  • Passwords
  • Secrets
Walkthrough
  1. Warakiya Village
  2. Clock Tower of Untimely Death
  3. The Mad Forest
  4. The Murky Marsh of Morbid Morons
  5. The Haunted Ship of Fools
  6. Alucard's Cave
  7. Curse Castle
  8. The Moat Bridge of Peril
  9. Underground Catacombs
  10. Sunken City of Poltergeists
  11. Abandoned Mines
  12. Castle Courtyard
  13. The Main Hall
  14. The Inner Halls
  15. Dracula's Final Clock Tower

editCastlevania series

Canon: Lament of Innocence · Dracula's Curse · Curse of Darkness · The Adventure · Belmont's Revenge · Castlevania · Simon's Quest · Harmony of Dissonance · Rondo of Blood · Symphony of the Night · Order of Ecclesia · Bloodlines · Portrait of Ruin · Aria of Sorrow · Dawn of Sorrow

Non-canon: Castlevania Legends · Castlevania 64 · Legacy of Darkness · Circle of the Moon

Remakes & Collections: Castlevania Chronicles · Dracula X · The Dracula X Chronicles · Super Castlevania IV · Vampire Killer


Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse

Developer(s) Konami
Publisher(s) Konami
Famicom
NES (NA)
Virtual Console
Palcom
NES (EU)
Release date Famicom:
December 22, 1989 (JP)
NES:
October 1990 (NA)
December 10, 1992 (EU)
Genre 2D platformer
Mode(s) Single player
Age rating(s) N/A
NES
Platform(s) Famicom
Nintendo Entertainment System
Virtual Console
Media 3 Megabit Cartridge
Famicom
NES
Input NES Controller
Credits | Soundtrack | Codes | Walkthrough


Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse is a game released for the Famicom and Nintendo Entertainment System. The game was later ported to the Wii Virtual Console and is the prequel to Castlevania.

Story

The year is 1476, and Count Dracula has started to ravage Europe with an army of monsters. His sole purpose is to exterminate mankind, extracting his vengeance upon humanity after the death of his beloved wife Lisa, mistakenly executed as a witch for preparing medicine to help the sick.

The Belmont family of vampire hunters, once exiled from Wallachia, are called into action by the Church. They feared the Belmonts' "super-human" power, but with Dracula menacing to swallow Europe in darkness, they are left with no choice but to call Trevor Belmont, current wielder of the Vampire Killer whip. Joining Trevor in his mission to defeat Dracula are three new characters: Sypha Belnades, a young priestess with poor physical attack power but powerful magic spells at her disposal; Grant DaNasty, a pirate with the ability to climb on walls and change direction in mid-jump (a rare ability in earlier games of the series); and Alucard, Dracula's son, a dhampir with the ability to shoot fireballs and transform into a bat.

Trevor and his companions cross the Transylvanian countryside, defeat Dracula's minions, and eventually defeat the Count himself. Once his father is defeated, Alucard goes into a self-induced slumber, unable to cope with having fought his father. Moreover, he realized that his own power could pose a potential threat to the world. However, he would awaken in the late-eighteenth century when feeling the absence of a Belmont when Dracula was revived by the dark priest Shaft. Grant DaNasty oversees the reconstruction of Wallachia after the battle is finished. Trevor Belmont and Sypha Belnades end up getting married once peace is restored in the region (according to the Castlevania Time Line included with Castlevania: Portrait of Ruin).

Alucard appears in several subsequent Castlevania games, as do Sypha's distant relatives (Carrie Fernandez, Charlotte Aulin, and Yoko Belnades).

Gameplay

Castlevania III plays like a mixture of its predecessors. The levels are laid out in a very linear fashion much like the first game and candles contain different weapons and powerups that the player can use. However, the game differs from Castlevania in that after finishing certain levels, the player is allowed to choose where they would like to go next. This gives it some of the elements of Castlevania II, allowing the player to choose the route they take towards Dracula.

Trevor can be accompanied by only one of his companions at a time, and the player can switch between Trevor and his ally with the "select" button. Both Trevor and whoever is accompanying him share the same health meter. The ending of the game differs depending on which companion Trevor has with him at the time, or if he does not take another character with him at all.

The game also featured an improved password system that used icons placed onto a 4x4 grid instead of lengthy letter and number passwords.

Gallery


Castlevania series
Games
CastlevaniaVampire Killer • Simon's Quest • The Adventure • Dracula's Curse • Belmont's Revenge • Super Castlevania IV • Rondo of Blood • Bloodlines • Dracula X • Symphony of the Night • LegendsCastlevania (64) • Legacy of Darkness • Circle of the Moon • Harmony of Dissonance • Aria of Sorrow • Lament of Innocence • Dawn of Sorrow • Curse of Darkness • Portrait of Ruin • Order of Ecclesia • Judgement
Characters
Castlevania | Sorrow series
Equipment:
Weapons | Spells
Misc
Storyline | Castlevania Dracula Begins
Castlevania stub
This Castlevania-related article is a stub. You can help by adding to it.

Stubs are articles that writers have begun work on, but are not yet complete enough to be considered finished articles.


This article uses material from the "Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse" article on the Gaming wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English

Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse
Developer(s) Konami
Publisher(s) Konami (Japan / US)
Palcom (Europe)
Designer(s) H. Akamatsu
Series Castlevania
Platform(s) NES/Famicom
Release date(s) JP December 22, 1989
NA September 1, 1990
PAL December 10 1992
Genre(s) Platform game
Mode(s) Single player
Rating(s) ESRB: E (PC version)
Media 3-megabit cartridge

Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse, known in Japan as Akumajō Densetsu (悪魔城伝説? lit. "Demon Castle Legend"), is an action platforming video game made by Konami for the Nintendo Entertainment System game console. It's the third game released in the Castlevania series, and stars Trevor Blemont, Simon Belmont's ancestor. It takes place 215 years before Castlevania I and II.








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message