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Household cat

A cat repeller is a device or substance used to discourage cats from entering an area, or to encourage them to leave if they do enter. Such deterrents are most commonly used by gardeners, in order to prevent damage to their gardens, to avoid cat feces, or to protect birds.

Contents

Devices

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Ultrasonic devices

Many retailers sell cat repellents with motion sensors, which are triggered when cats walk or move past the device. This will cause the device to emit a high frequency noise which is uncomfortable to the cats, but inaudible to most humans. The devices are available in both battery and mains operated forms, the latter having more range and requiring less attention.

Some cats are immune to ultrasonic cat deterrents, mainly the ones which are hard of hearing. There are also reports that the devices take a while to become effective, as some cats will stand their ground in a futile attempt to make the deterrent go away. Moving the device to different locations regularly and combining with another form of cat repellent will make the device more effective.

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, on the basis of a trial involving 150 volunteers, has endorsed a commercial product called "CatWATCH".[1]

Scatter guns are another form of ultrasonic device. These laser-aiming devices can be targeted at cats and activated by a trigger. They will send out an ultrasonic noise directed where aimed.

Electric fences

A variety of commercially produced electric fences are also available, with voltages low enough to deter but not cause harm to cats. Care must be taken with the strength of electric current used; one Cumbria pensioner received a fine for setting up a system based on a 12v battery charger, knowingly allowing a dangerously high current to flow through the wiring as he had lied about using a battery charger and had instead had used the 230v mains electricity supply to energize the wiring. [2][3].

Cats Protection describe the use of electric fences as "barbaric" on their website due to the physical harming of a cat or any other creature that comes into contact with an electric fence.

Substances

Crystals

A more traditional cat repeller is to use jelly-like crystals containing methyl nonyl ketone, designed to be scattered around the garden, or around the areas the cat likes to foul. These repellants give off a smell that is very unpleasant to the cat, causing it to avoid that place.

Citronella

Citronella oil, famous for repelling flying insects and other creepy crawlies, can also be used to get rid of cats. Citronella sticks are a common form, coming in citronella-impregnated plastic "repeller sticks".

Lion dung

Lion dung has been reported to be an effective method of deterring cats, and has received support from the British organisation Cats Protection. One anecdotal experience reported by the BBC[4] found that it was not terribly effective however.

References

External links



A cat repeller is a device or substance used to discourage cats from entering an area, or to encourage them to leave if they do enter. Such deterrents are most commonly used by gardeners, in order to prevent damage to their gardens, to avoid cat feces, or to protect birds.

Contents

Devices

Ultrasonic devices

Many retailers sell cat repellents with motion sensors, which are triggered when cats walk or move past the device. This will cause the device to emit a high frequency noise which is uncomfortable to the cats, but inaudible to most humans. The devices are available in both battery and mains operated forms, the latter having more range and requiring less attention.

Some cats are immune to ultrasonic cat deterrents, mainly the ones which are hard of hearing. There are also reports that the devices take a while to become effective, as some cats will stand their ground in a futile attempt to make the deterrent go away. Moving the device to different locations regularly and combining with another form of cat repellent will make the device more effective.

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, on the basis of a trial involving 150 volunteers, has endorsed a commercial product called "CatWATCH".[1]

Scatter guns are another form of ultrasonic device. These laser-aiming devices can be targeted at cats and activated by a trigger. They will send out an ultrasonic noise directed where aimed.

Electric fences

A variety of commercially produced electric fences are also available, with voltages low enough to deter but not cause harm to cats. Care must be taken with the strength of electric current used; one Cumbria pensioner received a fine for setting up a system based on a 12v battery charger, knowingly allowing a dangerously high current to flow through the wiring as he had lied about using a battery charger and had instead had used the 230v mains electricity supply to energize the wiring. [2][3].

Cats Protection describe the use of electric fences as "barbaric" on their website due to the physical harming of a cat or any other creature that comes into contact with an electric fence.

Substances

Crystals

A more traditional cat repeller is to use jelly-like crystals containing methyl nonyl ketone, designed to be scattered around the garden, or around the areas the cat likes to foul. These repellants give off a smell that is very unpleasant to the cat, causing it to avoid that place.

Citronella

Citronella oil, famous for repelling flying insects and other creepy crawlies, can also be used to get rid of cats. Citronella sticks are a common form, coming in citronella-impregnated plastic "repeller sticks".

Lion dung

Lion dung has been reported to be an effective method of deterring cats, and has received support from the British organisation Cats Protection. One anecdotal experience reported by the BBC[4] found that it was not terribly effective however.

References

External links


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