Cecil County, Maryland: Wikis

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Cecil County, Maryland
Seal of Cecil County, Maryland
Map of Maryland highlighting Cecil County
Location in the state of Maryland
Map of the U.S. highlighting Maryland
Maryland's location in the U.S.
Seat Elkton
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

418 sq mi (1,083 km²)
348 sq mi (901 km²)
70 sq mi (181 km²), 16.69%
PopulationEst.
 - (2007)
 - Density

95,618
246/sq mi (95/km²)
Founded 1674
Website www.ccgov.org

Cecil County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maryland. It is part of the Delaware Valley. It was named for Cæcilius Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore (1605-1675), who was the first Proprietary Governor of the colony of Maryland from 1632 until his death in 1675. The county seat is Elkton. The newspaper of record is the Cecil Whig. As of 2000, the population was 85,951.

Contents

Law and government

Cecil County is governed by county commissioners, the traditional form of county government in Maryland.

History

Cecil County was created in 1674 by proclamation of the Governor. It was created from portions of Baltimore and Kent Counties. One of the earliest developers of the county was George Talbot, who came from Ballyconnell, County Cavan, Ireland.[1]

The county has a number of properties on the National Register of Historic Places.[2]

Geography

Cecil County is in the northeast corner of Maryland, south of the Pennsylvania line and west of the Delaware line. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 418 square miles (1,082 km²), of which, 348 square miles (902 km²) of it is land and 70 square miles (181 km²) of it (16.69%) is water.

The southern part of the county is mainly flat. North of U.S. Route 40, the terrain becomes hilly, with the most rugged hills occurring in the northwestern and north central parts of the county. The lowest elevation is sea level along the Chesapeake Bay. The highest elevation is 534 feet just below the Mason-Dixon line near Nottingham, Pennsylvania just east of U.S. Route 1.

Cecil County, Maryland is physically divided into two masses of land by the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. Most people believe that it is part of Maryland's Eastern Shore, and therefore the Delmarva Peninsula, because of its location in Maryland. Many publications about Maryland have Cecil County as being part of the Eastern Shore.

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Adjacent counties

Demographics

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 85,951 people, 31,223 households, and 23,292 families residing in the county. The population density was 247 people per square mile (95/km²). There were 34,461 housing units at an average density of 99 per square mile (38/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 93.39% White, 3.91% Black or African American, 0.33% Native American, 0.69% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. 1.52% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 17.9% were of German, 16.1% Irish, 13.8% English, 13.8% American and 6.5% Italian ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 31,223 households out of which 37.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.60% were married couples living together, 11.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.40% were non-families. 19.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the county the population was spread out with 27.70% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 31.20% from 25 to 44, 23.20% from 45 to 64, and 10.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 98.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $50,510, and the median income for a family was $56,469. Males had a median income of $40,350 versus $28,646 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,384. About 5.40% of families and 7.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.20% of those under age 18 and 7.70% of those age 65 or over.

May 2008 the county commissioners adopted a 10% property tax increase. This is in addition to the property tax increase added by the increasing property assessments, which are increased each year and reassessed every 3 years.

Maryland state planning data suggest that the population of the county could double in the next thirty years, reaching 160,000 by 2030.[Tangel]

Public libraries

There are 7 branches of the Cecil County Public Library and the Library also does significant outreach throughout the county.

Public school system

There are 17 elementary schools, 6 middle schools,and 5 high schools, operated by Cecil County Public Schools.

Cities and towns

This county contains the following incorporated municipalities:

  1. Cecilton (incorporated 1864)
  2. Charlestown (incorporated 1742)
  3. Chesapeake City (incorporated 1849) (Note that despite the name, Chesapeake City is a town and not a city .)
  4. Elkton (incorporated 1787)
  5. North East (incorporated 1849)
  6. Perryville (incorporated 1882)
  7. Port Deposit (incorporated 1824)
  8. Rising Sun (incorporated 1860)

All eight are classified as towns under Maryland law.

The United States Census Bureau recognizes no Census-Designated Places in Cecil County, which is unusual for Maryland counties, which usually have many unincorporated population centers.

There are a few areas that aren't listed as Census Designated Places:

  1. Calvert
  2. Carpenter Point
  3. Childs
  4. Colora
  5. Conowingo
  6. Earleville
  7. Elk Mills
  8. Elk Neck
  9. Fair Hill
  10. Georgetown
  11. Perry Point
  12. Red Point
  13. Warwick
  14. White Crystal Beach

Notable residents

See also


References

  1. ^ George Johnston (1881). History of Cecil County. http://www.archive.org/details/historyofcecilco00john. 
  2. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-15. http://www.nr.nps.gov/. 
  3. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ a b Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Marquis Who's Who. 1967. 

External links

Coordinates: 39°34′N 75°57′W / 39.57°N 75.95°W / 39.57; -75.95


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

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Cecil County, Maryland
Seal of Cecil County, Maryland
Map
File:Map of Maryland highlighting Cecil County.png
Location in the state of Maryland
Map of the USA highlighting Maryland
Maryland's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded 1674
Seat Elkton
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 16.69%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2007)
 - Density

99506
Website: www.ccgov.org

Cecil County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maryland. It is part of the Delaware Valley metropolitan area. It was named for Cæcilius Calvert (1605-1675), who was the first Proprietary Governor of the colony of Maryland from 1632 until his death in 1675. The county seat is Elkton. The newspaper of record is the Cecil Whig. As of 2000, the population was 85,951.

Contents

Law and government

Cecil County is governed by county commissioners, the traditional form of county government in Maryland.

History

Cecil County was created in 1674 by proclamation of the Governor. It was created from portions of Baltimore and Kent Counties.

Geography

Cecil County is in the extreme northeast corner of Maryland, south of the Pennsylvania line and west of the Delaware line. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,082 km² (418 sq mi). 902 km² (348 sq mi) of it is land and 181 km² (70 sq mi) of it (16.69%) is water.

The southern part of the county is mainly flat. North of U.S. Route 40, the terrain becomes hilly, with the most rugged hills occurring in the northwestern and north central parts of the county. The lowest elevation is sea level along the Chesapeake Bay. The highest elevation is 534 feet just below the Mason-Dixon line near Nottingham, Pennsylvania just east of U.S. Route 1.

Adjacent Counties

Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 85,951 people, 31,223 households, and 23,292 families residing in the county. The population density was 95/km² (247/sq mi). There were 34,461 housing units at an average density of 38/km² (99/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 93.39% White, 3.91% Black or African American, 0.33% Native American, 0.69% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. 1.52% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 17.9% were of German, 16.1% Irish, 13.8% English, 13.8% American and 6.5% Italian ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 31,223 households out of which 37.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.60% were married couples living together, 11.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.40% were non-families. 19.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the county the population was spread out with 27.70% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 31.20% from 25 to 44, 23.20% from 45 to 64, and 10.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 98.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $50,510, and the median income for a family was $56,469. Males had a median income of $40,350 versus $28,646 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,384. About 5.40% of families and 7.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.20% of those under age 18 and 7.70% of those age 65 or over.

Maryland state planning data suggest that the population of the county could double in the next thirty years, reaching 160,000 by 2030.[Tangel]

Public School System

There are 17 elementary schools, 6 middle schools,and 5 high schools.

Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools
Bainbridge Elementary Bohemia Manor Middle Bohemia Manor High School
Bayview Elementary Cherry Hill Middle Elkton High School
Calvert Elementary Elkton Middle North East High School
Cecil Manor Elementary North East Middle Perryville High School
Cecilton Elementary Perryville Middle Rising Sun High School
Charleston Elementary Rising Sun Middle
Chesapeake City Elementary
Conowingo Elementary
Elk Neck Elementary
Gilpin Manor Elementary
Holy Hall Elementary
Kenmore Elementary
Leeds Elementary
North East Elementary
Perryville Elementary
Rising Sun Elementary
Thomas Estates Elementary

Cecil County Public Schools Website

Cities and towns

This county contains the following incorporated municipalities:

  1. Cecilton (incorporated 1864)
  2. Charlestown (incorporated 1742)
  3. Chesapeake City (incorporated 1849) (Note that despite the name, Chesapeake City is a town and not a city .)
  4. Elkton (incorporated 1787)
  5. North East (incorporated 1849)
  6. Perryville (incorporated 1882)
  7. Port Deposit (incorporated 1824)
  8. Rising Sun (incorporated 1860)

All eight are classified as towns under Maryland law.

The United States Census Bureau recognizes no Census-Designated Places in Cecil County, which is unusual for Maryland counties, which usually have many unincorporated population centers.

There are a few areas that aren't listed as Census Designated Places:

  1. Carpenter Point
  2. Childs
  3. Colora
  4. Conowingo
  5. Earleville
  6. Elk Mills
  7. Georgetown
  8. Perry Point
  9. Warwick

Notable residents

See also

References

  1. ^ a b (1967) Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Marquis Who's Who. 
  • ^ 
Tangel, Andrew. "Hundreds discuss growth in Cecil County", The News Journal, January 10, 2006, pp. B1. 

External links

Coordinates: 39°34′N 75°57′W / 39.57, -75.95


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Cecil County, Maryland. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Cecil County, MarylandRDF feed
County names Cecil County, Maryland  +
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Maryland  +
Short name Cecil County  +

This article uses material from the "Cecil County, Maryland" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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