Cerulean: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cerulean
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #007BA7
RGBB (r, g, b) (0, 123, 167)
HSV (h, s, v) (196°, 100%, 65%)
Source Internet
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Cerulean, also spelled caerulean, may be applied to a range of colors from deep blue, sky-blue, bright blue or azure color through greenish blue colors.

The first recorded use of cerulean as a color name in English was in 1590.[1] The word is probably derived from the Latin word caeruleus, "dark blue, blue or blue-green", which in turn probably derives from caelulum, diminutive of caelum, "heaven, sky".[2]

Contents

Use in artistic painting

Synthetic pigments simulating a cerulean blue hue; on canvas.

In classical times, cerulean was used to describe blue pigments, particularly mixtures of copper and cobaltous oxides. These early attempts to create sky blue colors were often less than satisfactory due to greenish hues and lack of permanence. When the pigment cerulean blue (shown in the color box above) was invented, it largely superseded all these prior pigments. See also Tekhelet.

Cerulean blue

Cerulean blue
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #2A52BE
RGBB (r, g, b) (42, 82, 190)
HSV (h, s, v) (224°, 78%, 75%)
Source Internet
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

The color cerulean blue is displayed at right.

Advertisements

Cerulean blue pigment

Discovered in 1805 by Andreas Höpfner, the pigment originally referred to as cerulean blue (or corruleum blue) was first marketed in 1860 as "coeruleum" by George Rowney of the United Kingdom. The primary chemical constituent of the pigment is cobalt(II) stannate.[3][4][5]

It is particularly valuable for artistic painting of skies because of the purity of the blue (specifically the lack of greenish hues), its permanence (no other blue pigments retained color as well), and its opaqueness.[6]

Today, cobalt chromate is sometimes marketed under the cerulean blue name but is darker and greener (Rex Art color index PB 36) than the cobalt stannate version (color index PB 35). The chromate makes excellent turquoise colors and is identified by Rex Art and some other manufacturers as "cobalt turquoise".[7][8]

Other variations of cerulean

Dark cerulean

Dark cerulean
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #08457E
RGBB (r, g, b) (0, 69, 126)
HSV (h, s, v) (209°, 94%, 49%)
Source [Unsourced]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

The color dark cerulean is displayed at right.

Bright cerulean

Bright Cerulean
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #1DACD6
RGBB (r, g, b) (29, 172, 214)
HSV (h, s, v) (209°, 94%, 49%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Bright cerulean is the color called cerulean by Crayola crayons.

Pale cerulean

Pale Cerulean
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #9BC4E2
RGBB (r, g, b) (155, 196, 226)
HSV (h, s, v) (205°, 31%, 89%)
Source Pantone
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Pale cerulean is the color called cerulean by Pantone. [9]

Cerulean in nature

Cerulean in human culture

Aerobatics

Computer software

Literature

Music

  • Cerulean is the album title for the September 10, 1991 music release by the band The Ocean Blue.

Science

Television

  • Repetition of the words "cerulean blue" is a method the "Pusher" villain uses at the beginning of the eponymous X-Files episode 17 season 3 in order to lull his victims to do what he wants.

Film

Video games

  • Azul the Cerulean is the blue-haired 33 year-old final recruit of the Tsviets in Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII.
  • Cerulean City is one of the pivotal locations in the game and anime Pokémon and is home to the Water Pokémon Gym in Kanto.

See also

References

External links


Simple English

This box shows the colour cerulean.
 

Cerulean is a range of colours from deep blue, sky-blue, bright blue or azure to deep cyan. The word cerulean comes from the Latin word caeruleum, which means "sky" or "heavens". This was in turn from Latin caeruleus dark blue: resembling the blue of the sky.

In classical times, this term was used to describe blue pigments, particularly mixtures of copper and cobaltous oxides. These early attempts to create sky blue colours were often less than satisfactory due to greenish hues and lack of permanence. When the pigment cerulean blue was invented people started using this instead.

The first recorded use of cerulean as a color name in English was in 1590.[1]

Contents

Meaning of cerulean

  • Cerulean represents the "sky" or "heavens", or sometimes the ocean.

Tones of cerulean color comparison chart

  • Pale Cerulean (Pantone Cerulean) (Hex: #9BC4E2) (RGB: 155, 196, 226)
  • Bright Cerulean (Crayola Cerulean) (Hex: #02A4D3) (RGB: 2, 164, 211)
  • CERULEAN (Cerulean pigment) (Hex: #007BA7) (RGB: 0, 123, 167)
  • Cerulean Blue (Cerulean blue pigment) (Hex: #2A52BE) (RGB: 42, 82, 190)
  • Dark Cerulean (Hex: #08457E) (RGB: 8, 69, 126)
ColoursList of colours
Cyan Magenta Black Grey Silver White
Red Orange Yellow Green Blue Indigo Violet
Gold Olive Purple Navy Brown Pink

References

  1. Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 190; Color Sample of Cerulean: Page 89 Plate 33 Color Sample E6
  2. 2004 Photo of Navy Blue Angels aerobatic team

Other pages


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message