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Citation V / Ultra
Citation Encore/Encore+
A UC-35A Citation 560 Ultra V of the US Army in Europe at RIAT 2008
Role Corporate jet
National origin United States
Manufacturer Cessna
First flight August 1987
Primary users United States Army
United States Marine Corps
Developed from Cessna Citation II
Variants Cessna Citation Excel

The Cessna Citation V (Model 560) is a turbofan-powered small-to-medium sized business jet built by the Cessna Aircraft Company in Wichita, Kansas. The Citation brand of business jets encompasses several distinct "families" of aircraft, and the Citation V was the basis for one of these families. This family includes the Citation V, the Citation Ultra, the Citation Encore, and the Citation Encore+. Some models are used by the United States military under the designation UC-35.

Contents

Design and development

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Citation V

Citation V

After stretching the Citation I to make the II, Cessna decided to increase the size of the cabin again, stretching the fuselage by another 20 inches (510 mm), resulting in the largest member of the straight-wing family, the Model 560 Citation V. The first engineering prototype flew in August 1987, and certification was granted in December, 1988. The aircraft utilized the T-47A's JT15D5A engines for extra performance. By the time the aircraft was superseded in 1994, 262 had been built.[1]

Citation Ultra

In 1993, Cessna decided to update the Citation V design, and announced the Citation Ultra, with the main differences being in the engines, which were the latest JT15D-5D version, and the standard avionics suite, which was updated to the Honeywell Primus 1000 EFIS glass cockpit. The Primus 1000 replaced the standard "round dial" flight instruments with three CRT computer screens, one for each pilot and one center mulifunction display.[1] In 1994, the Ultra was named Flying magazine's "Best Business Jet". The Ultra was produced from 1994-1999.

The UC-35A is the United States Army designation and UC-35C is the United States Marine Corps designation for the Citation Ultra, which replaced older versions of the C-12 Huron.[2]

Citation Encore/Encore+

USMC UC-35D at Mojave, California

Five years later, in 1998, the Model 560 was upgraded again as the Citation Encore, with Pratt & Whitney Canada PW535A engines and an increase in fuel capacity.[1][3] The Encore was certified in April 2000 with first delivery in late September 2000. The next upgrade was the Citation Encore+, with the addition of FADEC-controlled PW535B engines and Rockwell-Collins Pro Line 21 avionics suite.[4] The Encore+ was certified by the FAA in December 2006, with deliveries of production aircraft expected in the first quarter of 2007.

The UC-35B is the Army designation and UC-35D is the Marine Corps designation for the Citation Encore.[5][6]

Variants

  • Citation V (Model 560), growth variant of the Citation II/SP JT15D-5A[1][7]
  • Citation Ultra (Model 560) upgraded Citation V with JT15D-5D, EFIS instruments[7]
  • Citation Encore (Model 560) upgraded Citation Ultra with PW535A engines and improved trailing-link landing gear[7]
  • Citation Encore+ (Model 560) upgraded Encore includes FADEC and a redesigned avionics.[7]
  • UC-35A Army and Air Force transport version of the V Ultra.
  • UC-35B Army transport version of the Encore
  • UC-35C Marine Corps version of the V Ultra.[6].
  • UC-35D Marine Corps version of the Encore.[6]

Operators

Military operators

 Pakistan
 Switzerland
 United States

Specifications (Cessna Citation Ultra)

Data from Brassey's World Aircraft & Systems Directory 1999-2000 [8]

General characteristics

Performance

See also

Related development

References

  • Taylor, Michael J.H. (editor) Brassey's World Aircraft & Systems Directory 1999/2000. London: Brassey's, 1999. ISBN 1 85753 245 7.

External links


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