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Châmber vun Députéirten
Chambre des Députés
Abgeordnetenkammer

Chamber of Deputies
Coat of arms or logo.
Type
Type Unicameral
Leadership
President Laurent Mosar, CSV
since 28 July 2009
Structure
Members 60
Political groups CSV (26), LSAP (13), DP (9), Greens (7), ADR (4), Left (1)
Meeting place
Hôtel de la Chambre, Luxembourg City
Website
www.chd.lu
Luxembourg

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Luxembourg



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The Chamber of Deputies (Luxembourgish: Châmber vun Députéirten, French: Chambre des Députés, German: Abgeordnetenkammer), abbreviated to the Chamber, is the unicameral national legislature of Luxembourg. 'Krautmaart' is sometimes used as a metonym for the Chamber, after the square on which the Hôtel de la Chambre is located.

The Chamber is made up of 60 seats. Deputies are elected to serve five-year terms by proportional representation in four multi-seat constituencies. Voters may vote for as many candidates as the constituency elects deputies.

Contents

Functions

The function of the Chamber of Deputies is covered under Chapter IV of the Luxembourgian constitution, the first article of which states that the purpose of the Chamber is to represent the country.[1] Luxembourg is a parliamentary democracy,[2] in which the Chamber is elected by universal suffrage under the d'Hondt method of Party-list proportional representation.[3]

All laws must be passed by the Chamber.[4] Each bill must be submitted to two votes in the Chamber, with an interval of at least three months between the votes, for it to become law.[5] Laws are passed by absolute majority, provided that a quorum of half of the deputies is present.[6]

Hôtel de la Chambre

The Chamber of Deputies holds session in the Hôtel de la Chambre, located on Krautmaart, in the Ville Haute quarter of Luxembourg City. It was originally built between 1858 and 1860 as an annex to the Grand Ducal Palace, which had, until then, been used as one of many venues for the Chamber's convocations.[7]

The building was designed by Antoine Hartmann in a unified historicist style, combining elements of neo-Gothic, neo-Renaissance, and neo-classical architectural genres.[7] The Grand Ducal Palace, by contrast, was built over time in several architectural styles (primarily Renaissance and Baroque), but renovated in 1891 in a historicist neo-Renaissance manner.[8]

Latest election

e • d  Summary of the results of the 7 June 2009 election to Luxembourg's Chamber of Deputies
Party % Change Seats Change
Christian Social People's Party (CSV) 38.0 +1.9 26 +2
Luxembourg Socialist Workers' Party (LSAP) 21.6 −1.8 13 −1
Democratic Party (DP) 15.0 −1.1 9 −1
The Greens 11.7 +0.1 7 ±0
Alternative Democratic Reform Party (ADR) 8.1 −1.8 4 −1
The Left 3.3 +1.4 1 +1
Communist Party (KPL) 1.5 +0.6 0
Citizens' List 0.8 N/A 0 N/A
Total 100.0 60
Source: Centre Informatique de l'État

Current composition

Affiliation Deputies
Christian Social People's Party 251
Luxembourg Socialist Workers' Party 13
Democratic Party 9
The Greens 7
Alternative Democratic Reform Party 4
The Left 1
President of the Chamber 1
 Total
60
 Government Majority
17

1 Does not include Laurent Mosar, who is the President of the Chamber. Although Mosar is a CSV deputy, the President cannot vote or speak in debates (except to maintain order).[9]

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ Constitution, Article 50
  2. ^ Constitution, Article 51
  3. ^ Constitution, Article 51(3)
  4. ^ Constitution, Article 46
  5. ^ Constitution, Article 59
  6. ^ Constitution, Article 62
  7. ^ a b "The Chamber of Deputies". Service Information et Presse. 2003-11-21. http://www.gouvernement.lu/dossiers/famille_grand_ducale/chregneuk/annexeact/chambre_deputes/. Retrieved 2008-04-04.  
  8. ^ "Historical survey". Luxembourg City Tourist Office. http://www.global-issues-network.org/conference07archive/documents4download/lux_info/Lux_City_History_Promenade.pdf. Retrieved 2008-04-04.  
  9. ^ (French) "Présidence". Chamber of Deputies. http://www.chd.lu/wps/portal/public/!ut/p/c1/04_SB8K8xLLM9MSSzPy8xBz9CP0os3gXI5ewIE8TIwN380ATAyMvVy_z0GA_Y3cPY6B8pFm8kYVFcJC7o6-rpWWok4GngbNhsGugk5GBpxEB3X4e-bmp-gW5EeUANIY--g!!/dl2/d1/L2dJQSEvUUt3QS9ZQnB3LzZfRDJEVlJJNDIwRzdRNDAySkVKN1VTTjNHMzQ!/. Retrieved 2009-09-06.  

References

External links

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