The Full Wiki

More info on Charles Lallemant

Charles Lallemant: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Charles Lallemant
Born November 17, 1587(1587-11-17)
Died November 18, 1674 (aged 87)
Known for Relations des Jésuites de la Nouvelle-France
Relatives Jérôme Lalemant (brother)
Gabriel Lallemant (nephew)
Charles Lallemant letter-jesuits04jesuuoft.jpg

Charles Lallemant (Lalemant), (November 17, 1587 – November 18, 1674) came from France in 1625 as the first superior of the Jesuit missions in Canada. His letter to his brother dated 1 August, 1626, inaugurated the series Relations des Jésuites de la Nouvelle-France about the missionary work in that country.

Contents

Biography

Thwarted by the Trading Company at Quebec in his efforts to evangelize the Indians, Lallemant went to France to protest. Attempting to return to America his vessel was captured by Kirke who was then blockading the St. Lawrence and he was sent as a prisoner to England. A second attempt resulted in shipwreck off Cape Canso, and on his way back to France in a fishing smack which picked him up he was wrecked a second time on the coast of Spain. He finally reached America in 1632 after Quebec was restored to the French. He was the friend and confessor of Champlain, who died in his arms.

He returned again to France in 1638, where he became procurator of the Canadian missions, vice provincial and superior of the "Professed house" in Paris. It was he who obtained the concession of the Island of Montreal for the colony of Dauversière, and he also recruited Maisonneuve and Jeanne Mance to engage in the undertaking. When there was question of appointing the first Bishop of Quebec, his candidacy was urged. He is the author of a spiritual work, which was not widely known by 1911, entitled “La vie cachée de Notre Seigneur Jésus-Christ”, and is not to be confounded with Louis Lallemant who is the author of “Les Conferences Spirituelles”.

He had two close relatives in the Jesuit missions: Jérôme Lalemant, his brother, and Gabriel Lallemant, a nephew.

Gallery

External links

Original Sources

T.J. CAMPBELL Transcribed by Joseph E. O'Connor

This article incorporates text from the entry Charles Lalemant in the public-domain Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913.

Advertisements

Charles Lallemant
File:Replace this image
Born November 17, 1587(1587-11-17)
Died November 18, 1674 (aged 87)
Known for Relations des Jésuites de la Nouvelle-France
Relatives Jérôme Lalemant (brother)
Gabriel Lallemant (nephew)

Charles Lallemant (Lalemant), (November 17, 1587 – November 18, 1674) came from France in 1625 as the first superior of the Jesuit missions in Canada. His letter to his brother, dated 1 August 1626, inaugurated the series Relations des Jésuites de la Nouvelle-France about the missionary work in that country.

Contents

Biography

Thwarted by the Trading Company at Quebec in his efforts to evangelize the Indians, Lallemant went to France to protest. Attempting to return to America, his vessel was captured by Kirke who was then blockading the Saint Lawrence River. Lallemant was sent as a prisoner to England. A second attempt to travel to America resulted in shipwreck off Cape Canso, and on his way back to France he was wrecked a second time on the coast of Spain. He finally reached America in 1632 after Quebec was restored to the French. He was the friend and confessor of Samuel de Champlain, who died in his arms.

He returned again to France in 1638, where he became procurator of the Canadian missions, vice provincial and superior of the "Professed house" in Paris. He obtained the concession of the Island of Montreal for the colony of Dauversière, and he also recruited Maisonneuve and Jeanne Mance to engage in the undertaking. When there was question of appointing the first Bishop of Quebec, his candidacy was urged.

Lallemant was the author of a spiritual work entitled La vie cachée de Notre Seigneur Jésus-Christ.

He is not to be confused with Louis Lallemant, author of Les Conferences Spirituelles.

Lallemant had two close relatives in the Jesuit missions: Jérôme Lalemant, his brother, and Gabriel Lallemant, a nephew.

Gallery

External links

Original Sources

T.J. CAMPBELL Transcribed by Joseph E. O'Connor

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed (1913). "Charles Lalemant". Catholic Encyclopedia. Robert Appleton Company. 


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message