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Charles Darwin
Three quarter length studio photo showing Darwin's characteristic large forehead and bushy eyebrows with deep set eyes, pug nose and mouth set in a determined look. He is bald on top, with dark hair and long side whiskers but no beard or moustache. His jacket is dark, with very wide lapels, and his trousers are a light check pattern. His shirt has an upright wing collar, and his cravat is tucked into his waistcoat which is a light fine checked pattern.
Charles Robert Darwin, aged 45 in 1854, by then working towards publication of On the Origin of Species.
Born 12 February 1809(1809-02-12)
Mount House, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England
Died 19 April 1882 (aged 73)
Down House, Downe, Kent, England
Residence England
Citizenship British
Nationality British
Ethnicity English
Fields Naturalist
Institutions Geological Society of London
Alma mater University of Edinburgh
University of Cambridge
Academic advisors John Stevens Henslow
Adam Sedgwick
Known for The Voyage of the Beagle
On The Origin of Species
Natural selection
Influences Alexander von Humboldt
John Herschel
Charles Lyell
Influenced Joseph Dalton Hooker
Thomas Henry Huxley
George John Romanes
Ernst Haeckel
Ernst Mayr
Julian Huxley
Notable awards Royal Medal (1853)
Wollaston Medal (1859)
Copley Medal (1864)
Signature
"Charles Darwin", with the last name underlined by a downward curve that mimics the curve of the initial "C"
.Charles Robert Darwin FRS (12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist[I] who showed that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors, and proposed the scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection.^ Charles Darwin (12 Feb 1809 - 19 Apr 1882) English naturalist who presented facts to support his theory of the mode of evolution whereby favourable variations would survive which he called 'Natural Selection' or 'Survival of the Fittest.'
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The body and soul of Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution was his idea that evolution was made possible through natural selection.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Evolution, as advanced by 19th-century naturalist Charles Darwin , claims all ...
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.He published his theory with compelling evidence for evolution in his 1859 book On the Origin of Species.^ This important theory was popularized by Darwins publication On the Origin of Species (1859).
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^ Darwins complete theory was published in 1859, in On the Origin of Species.
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^ The evolution theory grew in popularity when Charles Darwin wrote "The Origin of Species" in 1859.
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[1][2] .The scientific community and much of the general public came to accept evolution as a fact in his lifetime,[3] but it was not until the emergence of the modern evolutionary synthesis from the 1930s to the 1950s that a broad consensus developed that natural selection was the basic mechanism of evolution.^ Darwin developed the theory of natural selection and the modern concept of biological evolution.
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^ The process of natural selection is not an evolutionary process.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Mayr is among the architects of the so-called modern synthesis of evolutionary biology that showed that Charles Darwins theory of natural selection applies to the evolution of genes at the molecular level (see Evolution: The Synthetic Theory).
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[4] .In modified form, Darwin's scientific discovery is the unifying theory of the life sciences, explaining the diversity of life.^ John Scopes Monkey Trial in Dayton, Tennessee in which reason, in the form of Charles Darwin s theory ...
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^ Both, however, take the Bible literally and reject Charles Darwin's evolutionary theory that all life, including human, shares common ancestry and developed ...
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^ Their scientific mentor, Charles Darwin , also made the same observation of the survival of the fittest (natural selection) which formed the basis for his ...
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[5][6]
.Darwin's early interest in nature led him to neglect his medical education at the University of Edinburgh; instead, he helped to investigate marine invertebrates.^ An academic degree, however, combined with an interest in natural history, and a professorial recommendation were almost not sufficient for Charles Darwin to go on the HMS Beagle .
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^ Professor Stephen Garnett from Charles Darwin University believes better fire management may have helped the bird's revival and he is optimistic it may even ...
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^ Charles Darwin University - Darwin,Australia Charles Darwin Universitys Katherine Campus, 16 kilometres north of the town, has helped to provide assistance to businesses and residents affected by last ...
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.Studies at the University of Cambridge encouraged his passion for natural science.^ Erasmus Darwin (1731-1802) was born near Nottingham , went to Chesterfield school, then Cambridge University where he studied classics, mathematics and medicine.
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^ As a university student Jacobsen specialized in natural sciences and later translated Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species and The Descent of Man into Danish.
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^ Ospovat, Dov, 198, The Development Of Darwin's Theory: Natural History, Natural Theology, And Natural Selection, 1838-1859 (Cambridge University Press).
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[7] .His five-year voyage on HMS Beagle established him as an eminent geologist whose observations and theories supported Charles Lyell's uniformitarian ideas, and publication of his journal of the voyage made him famous as a popular author.^ Darwin took a copy of Lyell's Principles with him on the voyage of the HMS Beagle .
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^ An academic degree, however, combined with an interest in natural history, and a professorial recommendation were almost not sufficient for Charles Darwin to go on the HMS Beagle .
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^ In June of 1872, thirty-three years after Darwin's HMS Beagle publication, Aggasiz visited the Galápagos Islands, viewing the same natural phenomena that Darwin observed.
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[8]
.Puzzled by the geographical distribution of wildlife and fossils he collected on the voyage, Darwin investigated the transmutation of species and conceived his theory of natural selection in 1838.[9] Although he discussed his ideas with several naturalists, he needed time for extensive research and his geological work had priority.^ Known for: Proposing the theory of natural selection .
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^ Known for: Proposing the theory of natural selection.
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^ Charles Darwin had concern about his theory of natural selection.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[10] .He was writing up his theory in 1858 when Alfred Russel Wallace sent him an essay which described the same idea, prompting immediate joint publication of both of their theories.^ Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913).
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^ "On 1 July 1858 Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace made the first public statement of their theory of evolution by natural selection before the Linnaean Society of London, and their papers were published on 20 August of the same year.
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^ His ideas, now defunct in the face of Charles Darwin and Sir Alfred Wallace's theory of natural selection, launched a revolution in biology.
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[11] .Darwin's work established evolutionary descent with modification as the dominant scientific explanation of diversification in nature.^ Their scientific mentor, Charles Darwin , also made the same observation of the survival of the fittest (natural selection) which formed the basis for his ...
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^ His most recent book, From So Simple a Beginning, is a collection of Charles Darwin s seminal works in natural history complete with Wilsons new ...
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^ Darwin claimed that in 1838 the reading of Malthus essay on population pressures triggered his recognition that "natural selection" was the evolutionary mechanism he had been looking for.
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[3] .In 1871, he examined human evolution and sexual selection in The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, followed by The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals.^ Published The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex, which explicitly stated that humans are descended from apes.
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^ His later booksincluding The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication (1868), The Descent of Man (1871), and The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (1872)were detailed expositions of topics that had been confined to small sections of the Origin.
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^ In fact this was 1881 and his two books The Descent of Man (1871) and The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals (1872) were published only a decade earlier when Darwin was over 60.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

.His research on plants was published in a series of books, and in his final book, he examined earthworms and their effect on soil.^ Wiesner of Vienna has just published a book vivisecting me in the most courteous, but awful manner, about the "Power of Movement in Plants."
  • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The famous British scientist Charles Darwin wrote his final book about earthworms in 1882, noting that worms lack a sense of hearing.
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^ Then, in 1882, Charles Darwin published a paper explaining how earthworms create soil from rotten vegetation.
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[12]
.In recognition of Darwin's pre-eminence as a scientist, he was one of only five 19th-century UK non-royal personages to be honoured by a state funeral,[13] and was buried in Westminster Abbey, close to John Herschel and Isaac Newton.^ Mythology: Later in the 19th century the theory of evolution put forward by English naturalist Charles Darwin heavily influenced the study of mythology.
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^ Evolution, as advanced by 19th-century naturalist Charles Darwin , claims all ...
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^ The Struggle School: Toward the end of the 19th century, another strain of social Darwinism was developed by supporters of the struggle school of sociology.
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[14]

Contents

Life of Darwin

Childhood and education

.
Three quarter length portrait of seated boy smiling and looking at the viewer.</span><span class=^ Charles Darwin Mind , 1877 See also: .
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^ Earlier in 1838, Emma's older brother Jos had married one of Charles Darwin's older sisters, and it was their child (Sophie Wedgwood) that had died three days after Charles Darwin and Emma Wedgwood were wed.
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^ The Darwin family attended Edinburgh University, in Scotland, and Charles Darwin entered Edinburgh in 1825, when he was sixteen and he left when he was eighteen.
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He has straight mid brown hair, and wears dark clothes with a large frilly white collar. In his lap he holds a pot of flowering plants" src="http://images-mediawiki-sites.thefullwiki.org/08/2/5/5/89142441763959860.jpg" width="170" height="242" class="thumbimage" />
The seven-year-old Charles Darwin in 1816.
.Charles Robert Darwin was born in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England on 12 February 1809 at his family home, the Mount.^ Charles Darwin 1809-1831 .
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^ Their son, Charles Darwin, was born in Shrewsbury in 1809.
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^ This is an essay about Charles Robert Darwin (1809-1882).
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[15] .He was the fifth of six children of wealthy society doctor and financier Robert Darwin, and Susannah Darwin (née Wedgwood).^ Darwin was one of six children born to Susannah Wedgwood (1765-1817).
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^ Erasmus Darwin's son Robert Wareing Darwin was also an eminent doctor, and married a member of the Wedgwood family.
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^ Born in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England on February 12, 1809, Darwin was the fifth child of a wealthy and sophisticated English family.
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.He was the grandson of Erasmus Darwin on his father's side, and of Josiah Wedgwood on his mother's side.^ His father was opposed to Darwin taking part in the voyage and Darwin would have followed his father's wishes not to go on the voyage had not his uncle, Jos Wedgwood, interceded for him and convinced his father to allow him to go.
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^ On November 11, 1838, Charles Darwin proposed to Emma Wedgwood, the daughter of Josiah Wedgwood II (and granddaughter of Josiah Wedgwood who established the famous pottery works).
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^ Erasmus Darwin's son Robert Wareing Darwin was also an eminent doctor, and married a member of the Wedgwood family.
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Both families were largely Unitarian, though the Wedgwoods were adopting Anglicanism. .Robert Darwin, himself quietly a freethinker, had baby Charles baptised in the Anglican Church, but Charles and his siblings attended the Unitarian chapel with their mother.^ Robert Darwin had Darwin brought up like his devout mother as an Anglican (i.e.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Charles Robert Darwin was brought up as an Anglican with Unitarian leanings.
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^ Darwin himself had become indirectly involved in the gospel and temperance movement through an Irish member of the Brethren church James Fegan.
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.The eight year old Charles already had a taste for natural history and collecting when he joined the day school run by its preacher in 1817. That July, his mother died.^ Nonetheless, Charles and his siblings attended the Unitarian chapel with their mother, and early in 1817, Charles joined the day school run by its preacher.
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^ When Charles Darwin was about eight years old, he was sent to a day-school, and it seems that even at this time his taste for natural history, and especially for collecting shells and minerals, was well developed.

^ In July of that year, his mother died; he was only eight.
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.From September 1818, he joined his older brother Erasmus attending the nearby Anglican Shrewsbury School as a boarder.^ Leaving school at age 14, Wallace joined his brother in London and began to train as a surveyor.
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^ In his infancy in Shrewsbury, he had the nickname of "Babba" and while a young teenager, his brother Erasmus wrote to young "Bobby."
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^ Until 1818 Emily Catherine and Charles Darwin were educated at home by their older sister Caroline; then Darwin began to attend a boarding school one mile from home.
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[16]
.Darwin spent the summer of 1825 as an apprentice doctor, helping his father treat the poor of Shropshire, before going to the University of Edinburgh Medical School with his brother Erasmus in October 1825. He found lectures dull and surgery distressing, so neglected his studies.^ Charles Darwin's brother, Erasmus Darwin (named after their paternal grandfather, the eminent physician Erasmus Darwin (1731-1802) had a tremendous amount of influence on Charles Darwin.
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^ The Darwin family attended Edinburgh University, in Scotland, and Charles Darwin entered Edinburgh in 1825, when he was sixteen and he left when he was eighteen.
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^ September 1996: PLEASE NOTE that this paper is based on a lecture (originally presented in the first person on October 4, 1990) entitled "Charles R. Darwin" for the Anthropology Forum at California State University, Chico.
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He learned taxidermy from John Edmonstone, a freed black slave who had accompanied Charles Waterton in the South American rainforest, and often sat with this "very pleasant and intelligent man".[17]
.In Darwin's second year he joined the Plinian Society, a student natural history group whose debates strayed into radical materialism.^ In 1823 a student natural history society, the Plinian Society, had started, and Darwin joined this with enthusiasm.
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^ An academic degree, however, combined with an interest in natural history, and a professorial recommendation were almost not sufficient for Charles Darwin to go on the HMS Beagle .
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^ The next year, Darwin published On the Origin of Species , the book that made the theory of natural selection famous.
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.He assisted Robert Edmund Grant's investigations of the anatomy and life cycle of marine invertebrates in the Firth of Forth, and in March 1827 presented at the Plinian his own discovery that black spores found in oyster shells were the eggs of a skate leech.^ He was also recommended by the conservative evangelical scientists John Fleming and David In 1827, then, Grant became professor of comparative anatomy and zoology in University College London.
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^ Grant became a lecturer on invertebrate animals in Knox's extramural anatomy school in 1824.
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^ On 27th March 1827 Darwin 's first proper scientific paper was delivered to the Plinian Society on an obscure marine invertebrate Flustra.
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One day, Grant praised Lamarck's evolutionary ideas. .Darwin was astonished, but had recently read the similar ideas of his grandfather Erasmus and remained indifferent.^ Darwin's own grandfather Erasmus had believed so.
  • Petzold Book Blog - 1859 Books: Charles Darwin’s “On the Origin of Species” 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.charlespetzold.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Young Darwin had read and admired his grandfather's book in which a theory of evolution similar to Lamarck's was described a decade before the French zoologist published his own more famous theory.

^ Though Darwin’s ideas were modified by later developments in genetics and molecular biology, his work remains central to modern evolutionary theory.
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[18] .Darwin was rather bored by Robert Jameson's natural history course which covered geology including the debate between Neptunism and Plutonism.^ An academic degree, however, combined with an interest in natural history, and a professorial recommendation were almost not sufficient for Charles Darwin to go on the HMS Beagle .
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^ Dov Ospovat stated it succinctly in his 1981 publication entitled The Development Of Darwin's Theory: Natural History, Natural Theology, And Natural Selection, 1838-1859 : .
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^ In 1844 Robert Chambers published anonymously a tract of evolutionary Deism The Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation.
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.He learned classification of plants, and assisted with work on the collections of the University Museum, one of the largest museums in Europe at the time.^ He applied term 'evolution' (applied to embryonic development) to the process of transformation from 1834 time his works began to be more mystical and vague - dominated by idea of unitary universe.
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^ He received his Ph.D. from the Leiden University in 1870, then went to the University of Heidelberg to work with the German plant physiologist Julius von Sachs.
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[19]
.This neglect of medical studies annoyed his father, who shrewdly sent him to Christ's College, Cambridge, for a Bachelor of Arts degree as the first step towards becoming an Anglican parson.^ Darwin began his interests in natural history while a student at Cambridge and while there, it was Professor Henslow who persuaded him to become interested in Geology, after his disastrous Edinburgh experiences.
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^ Francis Darwin, who was with his father toward the end, reported that Darwin said, "I am not the least afraid to die," a few hours before his passing.
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^ If medicine was not to be Charles Darwin's calling, then his father decided that he must become a clergyman and a degree from Christ's College, Cambridge was necessity for that field.
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[20] .Darwin began there in January 1828, but preferred riding and shooting to studying.^ Although he was interested in shooting and riding, Charles Darwin was also interested in nature and insects.
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^ Darwin began his interests in natural history while a student at Cambridge and while there, it was Professor Henslow who persuaded him to become interested in Geology, after his disastrous Edinburgh experiences.
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.His cousin William Darwin Fox introduced him to the popular craze for beetle collecting which he pursued zealously, getting some of his finds published in Stevens' Illustrations of British entomology.^ Darwin would, of it would have seemed to him absurd to suppose that this would involve renouncing evolution itself rather than just some of his materialistic assumptions.
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^ Darwin was plainly uneasy about such militant atheists using him as a founding or guru figure, and may well have regretted some of his earlier expressions.
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^ Forced into finally getting some of his ideas into print, the Darwin and Wallace joint paper of 1858 came about because of this 1858 letter from Wallace.
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.He became a close friend and follower of botany professor John Stevens Henslow and met other leading naturalists who saw scientific work as religious natural theology, becoming known to these dons as "the man who walks with Henslow". When exams drew near, Darwin focused on his studies and was delighted by the language and logic of William Paley's Evidences of Christianity.^ Henslow had been a Professor of Mineralogy, and then of Botany, but was also at home in mathematics and theology.
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^ Man (112) The man who walks with Henslow.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He was delighted with the logic of William Paley's Evidences for Christianity when he read it as part of his Cambridge degree.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[21] In his final examination in January 1831 Darwin did well, coming tenth out of a pass list of 178.[22]
.Darwin had to stay at Cambridge until June.^ Residential requirements kept Darwin at Cambridge until June.
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^ It was not until June, 1842, however, that Darwin allowed himself the satisfaction of writing a very brief abstract of his theory in thirty-five pages.

.He studied Paley's Natural Theology which made an argument for divine design in nature, explaining adaptation as God acting through laws of nature.^ Paley, Wiliam (1802) Natural Theology .
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He understood immediately that if natural selection explained adaptations, and evolution by descent were true, then the argument from design was dead and all that went with it, namely the existence of a personal god , free will, life after death, immutable moral laws, and ultimate meaning in life.
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^ "When Darwin deduced the theory of natural selection to explain the adaptations in which he had previously seen the handiwork of God, he knew that he was committing cultural murder.
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[23] .He read John Herschel's new book which described the highest aim of natural philosophy as understanding such laws through inductive reasoning based on observation, and Alexander von Humboldt's Personal Narrative of scientific travels.^ The theory of natural selection both predicts that such differences will exist and provides a scientific understanding of why they do.
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^ While there, he also read the work of the German naturalist Friedrich Humboldt (1769-1859) and his Personal Narrative and began to learn Spanish for a trip to Tenerife (the largest of the Canary Islands off the northwest coast of Africa).
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^ The term social Darwinist is applied loosely to anyone who interprets human society primarily in terms of biology, struggle, competition or natural law, a philosophy based on what is considered the permanent characteristics of human nature.
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.Inspired with "a burning zeal" to contribute, Darwin planned to visit Tenerife with some classmates after graduation to study natural history in the tropics.^ Darwin was not "almost bedridden for some months before he died", was not "always studying" the Bible, and he had no particular feeling for its "grandeur".
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ An academic degree, however, combined with an interest in natural history, and a professorial recommendation were almost not sufficient for Charles Darwin to go on the HMS Beagle .
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^ Trial (6) Darwin's book is very important and serves me as a basis in natural science for the class struggle in history.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

.In preparation, he joined Adam Sedgwick's geology course, then went with him in the summer for a fortnight to map strata in Wales.^ Trinity Fellow Adam Sedgwick (who had attended Farish and Clarke's lectures) had become Woodwardian Professor of Geology in 1818, began annual lectures in 1819, and went on to become a key stratigraphic geologist.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ His last geology excursion was in 1842, when he went to Wales to observe the evidence of glacial action.
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^ Henslow also arranged for Darwin to accompany Adam Sedgewick (1785-1873), Cambridge University Professor of Geology, on a field trip through Wales during the Summer of 1831.
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[24] .After a week with student friends at Barmouth, he returned home to find a letter from Henslow proposing Darwin as a suitable (if unfinished) gentleman naturalist for a self-funded place with captain Robert FitzRoy, more as a companion than a mere collector, on HMS Beagle which was to leave in four weeks on an expedition to chart the coastline of South America.^ Darwin was not the first choice of naturalist on the HMS Beagle.
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^ Charles Darwin: More than the origin Login Home .

^ Charles Darwin: More than the origin .

[25] .His father objected to the planned two-year voyage, regarding it as a waste of time, but was persuaded by his brother-in-law, Josiah Wedgwood, to agree to his son's participation.^ Unfortunately, the two years at Edinburgh demonstrated that he had neither the aptitude nor the interest in medicine of his father and medicine was not for him.
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^ Two-thirds of the crew who had been with Captain FitzRoy on his previous voyage to South America in the years 1828-1830 had also "signed-up" to accompany him on this latest voyage.
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^ When Charles Darwin was 8 years old his mother, Susannah Wedgwood, died at the age of fifty-two (July 1817).
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[26]

Journey of the Beagle

.
Route from Plymouth, England, south to Cape Verde then southwest across the Atlantic to Bahia, Brazil, south to Rio de Janeiro, Montevideo, the Falkland Islands, round the tip of South America then north to Valparaiso and Callao.</span><span class=^ Darwin wrote in the first published account on the voyage of the HMS Beagle in 1839: .
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^ While healthy as a youth, after his 1831-1836 voyage on HMS Beagle , Charles Darwin was chronically ill, having contracted what was eventually termed Chagas Disease.
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^ This is why Darwin's voyage of the HMS Beagle , beginning when he was an intelligent (and well trained) impressionable individual at the age of 22 was so exciting.
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.Northwest to the Galapagos Islands before sailing west across the Pacific to New Zealand, Sydney, Hobart in Tasmania, and King George's Sound in Western Australia.^ The expedition made stops at the Kerguelen Islands of the southern Indian Ocean, at New Zealand, at the island of Van Diemens Land (present-day Tasmania) and at islands of the Southern Ocean.
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^ Wallace opposed to continent uniting New Zealand, Australia and.
  • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ FitzRoy became head of HM Meteorological Office and from 1843-1845 he was the Governor of New Zealand, islands that the British Empire claimed in the South Pacific (so that France would not acquire them).
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Northwest to the Keeling Islands, southwest to Mauritius and Cape Town, then northwest to Bahia and northeast back to Plymouth." src="http://images-mediawiki-sites.thefullwiki.org/02/2/2/0/17513261480055464.png" width="400" height="169" class="thumbimage" />
The voyage of the Beagle
.Beginning on the 27th of December, 1831, the voyage lasted almost five years and, as FitzRoy had intended, Darwin spent most of that time on land investigating geology and making natural history collections, while the Beagle surveyed and charted coasts.^ Darwin's time it was years!
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^ Oh, this is the most exciting time in history.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ An academic degree, however, combined with an interest in natural history, and a professorial recommendation were almost not sufficient for Charles Darwin to go on the HMS Beagle .
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[3][27] .He kept careful notes of his observations and theoretical speculations, and at intervals during the voyage his specimens were sent to Cambridge together with letters including a copy of his journal for his family.^ Published notebooks containing meticulous observations of animal and plant species and geology made during the Beagle voyage.
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^ Charles Darwin Journal of Researches: Into the Natural History and Geology of the Countries Visited During the Voyage of H.M.S. BeagIe Round the World (1839), ch.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Charles Darwin Journal of Researches: into the Natural History and Geology of the Countries Visited During the Voyage of H.M.S. Beagle Round the World (1839), ch.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

[28] He had some expertise in geology, beetle collecting and dissecting marine invertebrates, but in all other areas was a novice and ably collected specimens for expert appraisal.[29] Despite repeatedly suffering badly from seasickness while at sea, most of his zoology notes are about marine invertebrates, starting with plankton collected in a calm spell.[27][30]
On their first stop ashore at St. Jago, Darwin found that a white band high in the volcanic rock cliffs included seashells. .FitzRoy had given him the first volume of Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology which set out uniformitarian concepts of land slowly rising or falling over immense periods,[II] and Darwin saw things Lyell's way, theorising and thinking of writing a book on geology.^ Darwin started out the voyage on HMS Beagle with the first volume of Lyell's Principles of Geology (1830), presented to him by FitzRoy.
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^ It is fortunate that opinions change over time since it was the first volume of Sir Charles Lyell's work on geology that Darwin took with him on his voyage on the HMS Beagle around the world in 1831-1836.
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^ This was not to suggest that the name was neatly stitched therein, but that Charles Darwin's mother was teaching him the rudiments of the Linnaean system of classification.
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[31] In Brazil, Darwin was delighted by the tropical forest,[32] but detested the sight of slavery.[33]
.At Punta Alta in Patagonia he made a major find of fossil bones of huge extinct mammals in cliffs beside modern seashells, indicating recent extinction with no signs of change in climate or catastrophe.^ Denton blasts all of the previous arguments made by the pro-evolutionists showing that there is essentially no support of macro-evolution in the fossil record.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The fossil record (petrified bones found in the ground as at the Dinosaur National Park in Jensen, Utah, USA) shows no intermediate or transitional species.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Perhaps some of the sea creatures survived this chaotic period, because we find ancient fossils that appear to be identical to some modern species, such as sharks.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

.He identified the little known Megatherium by a tooth and its association with bony armour which had at first seemed to him like a giant version of the armour on local armadillos.^ So it was arranged that I should call at three P.M. I should like to give you my impressions when I first saw him.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

The finds brought great interest when they reached England.[34][35] .On rides with gauchos into the interior to explore geology and collect more fossils he gained social, political and anthropological insights into both native and colonial people at a time of revolution, and learnt that two types of rhea had separate but overlapping territories.^ Yet both developed the same insight into the biological mechanism by which species gradually change by adapting to the particular pressures and requirements of their environment.
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^ "The political and social temper of English life at this time was conservative, in reaction to the excesses of the French Revolution [of 1789].
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^ Spencer revised Darwins biological theory into social Darwinism, a body of ideas that applied the theory of evolution to society, politics, the economy, and education.
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[36][37] Further south he saw stepped plains of shingle and seashells as raised beaches showing a series of elevations. .He read Lyell's second volume and accepted its view of "centres of creation" of species, but his discoveries and theorising challenged Lyell's ideas of smooth continuity and of extinction of species.^ Experiment (199) I see no good reason why the views given this volume [ The Origin of Species ] should shock the religious feelings of any one.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the view of the catastrophists, species were individually created and immutable, that is, unchangeable for all time.
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^ The second volume of the three-volume magnum opus reached Darwin in Montevideo, South America, on the 26th of October 1832 and Darwin continued to read Principles while on the voyage.
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[38][39]
On a sea inlet surrounded by steep hills, with high snow covered mountains in the distance, someone standing in an open canoe waves at a square-rigged sailing ship, seen from the front
As HMS Beagle surveyed the coasts of South America, Darwin theorised about geology and extinction of giant mammals.
.Three Fuegians on board, who had been seized during the first Beagle voyage and had spent a year in England, were taken back to Tierra del Fuego as missionaries.^ He spent much time with his cousin William Darwin Fox who was four years older and in his final year.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Wallace spent three years deep in the Amazon basin, collecting many species of fish, insect, and plant life.
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^ Published notebooks containing meticulous observations of animal and plant species and geology made during the Beagle voyage.
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.Darwin found them friendly and civilised, yet their relatives seemed "miserable, degraded savages", as different as wild from domesticated animals.^ He was neither Whig nor materialist yet his theory seemed essentially the same as Darwin 's.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In July of 1837, Charles Darwin began his notebooks (which culminated in Origin ) and started gathering all of the facts that he could on variations in plants and animals, both under domestication and existing in the wilds of nature.
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^ The newspapers take different views of the purport of the Bill, but it seems generally supposed that it would prevent demonstrations on animals rendered insensible, and this seems to me a monstrous provision.
  • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

[40] .To Darwin the difference showed cultural advances, not racial inferiority.^ As a result of this experience, Darwin came to think that humans were not as far removed from animals as his friends believed, and saw differences as relating to cultural advances towards civilisation rather than being racial.
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^ Darwin produced practical explanations for the differences between males and females, and between different races and cultures.

^ Why do male-female differences show up even across huge cultural, economic, social, political, religious, and historical divides?
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.Unlike his scientist friends, he now thought there was no unbridgeable gap between humans and animals.^ He now thought that humanity was not as far removed from animals as his clerical friends believed.
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^ There was no "gap" in his view between man and animals.
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^ The idea that there was no line to draw between man and beast would forever make Darwin a symbol of iconoclasm who removed humanity's privileged role in the center of the universe.

[41] .A year on, the mission had been abandoned.^ A year on, the mission had been abandoned and only Jemmy Button spoke with them to say he preferred his harsh previous way of life and did not want to return to England.
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.The Fuegian they'd named Jemmy Button lived like the other natives, had a wife, and had no wish to return to England.^ Figures like A R Wallace and T H Huxley brilliant though they were struggled to make enough to live on from their science.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ One had died and the other three (Fuegia Basket, York Minister, and Jeremy Button) were to be returned home.
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^ They are hopeful of finding intelligent life forms broadcasting in the narrow x-ray frequencies, even though no emissions have ever been found in the broad radio frequencies or any other frequency.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[42]
Darwin experienced an earthquake in Chile and saw signs that the land had just been raised, including mussel-beds stranded above high tide. High in the Andes he saw seashells, and several fossil trees that had grown on a sand beach. .He theorised that as the land rose, oceanic islands sank, and coral reefs round them grew to form atolls.^ British scientist Charles Darwin believed an atoll was formed when an island encircled by coral reef gradually sank into the sea, leaving a lagoon behind.
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^ Ari Atoll : An atoll is a ring-shaped coral island surrounding a central lagoon, primarily found in the tropical waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans.
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[43][44]
.On the geologically new Galápagos Islands Darwin looked for evidence attaching wildlife to an older "centre of creation", and found mockingbirds allied to those in Chile but differing from island to island.^ Most of the organic productions are aboriginal creations, found nowhere else; there is even a difference between the inhabitants of the different islands; yet all show a marked relationship with those of America, though separated from that continent by an open space of ocean, between 500 and 600 miles in width.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Darwin was about to launch on a geological "career" and he did so under the new paradigms.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Voyage of the Beagle : Darwins job as naturalist aboard the Beagle gave him the opportunity to observe the various geological formations found on different continents and islands along the way, as well as a huge variety of fossils and living organisms.
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He heard that slight variations in the shape of tortoise shells showed which island they came from, but failed to collect them, even after eating tortoises taken on board as food.[45][46] .In Australia, the marsupial rat-kangaroo and the platypus seemed so unusual that Darwin thought it was almost as though two distinct Creators had been at work.^ 'Surely two distinct Creators must have been at work' — Charles Darwin See also: .
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It sounds almost as though Darwin had had a few wild ideas about evolution when young, but hadn't thought much about it in recent years and had lost interest and regretted it all.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1944, Richard Hofstadter published Social Darwinism In American Thought and his fifty-two year old statement is as true and relevant today as it was in 1944: .
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[47] He found the Aborigines "good-humoured & pleasant", and noted their depletion by European settlement.[48]
The Beagle investigated how the atolls of the Cocos (Keeling) Islands had formed, and the survey supported Darwin's theorising.[44] .FitzRoy began writing the official Narrative of the Beagle voyages, and after reading Darwin's diary he proposed incorporating it into the account.^ Darwin edited his journals from the explorations and published them in 1839 as The Voyage of the Beagle .
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^ You will recall, as pointed out above, that Darwin also wrote of a "God of Nature" in his 1839 The Voyage of the Beagle .
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^ The second volume of the three-volume magnum opus reached Darwin in Montevideo, South America, on the 26th of October 1832 and Darwin continued to read Principles while on the voyage.
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[49] .Darwin's Journal was eventually rewritten as a separate third volume, on natural history.^ An academic degree, however, combined with an interest in natural history, and a professorial recommendation were almost not sufficient for Charles Darwin to go on the HMS Beagle .
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^ Trial (6) Darwin's book is very important and serves me as a basis in natural science for the class struggle in history.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dov Ospovat stated it succinctly in his 1981 publication entitled The Development Of Darwin's Theory: Natural History, Natural Theology, And Natural Selection, 1838-1859 : .
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[50]
In Cape Town Darwin and FitzRoy met John Herschel, who had recently written to Lyell praising his uniformitarianism as opening bold speculation on "that mystery of mysteries, the replacement of extinct species by others" as "a natural in contradistinction to a miraculous process".[51] When organising his notes as the ship sailed home, Darwin wrote that if his growing suspicions about the mockingbirds, the tortoises and the Falkland Islands Fox were correct, "such facts undermine the stability of Species", then cautiously added "would" before "undermine".[52] He later wrote that such facts "seemed to me to throw some light on the origin of species".[53]

Inception of Darwin's evolutionary theory

Three quarter length portrait of Darwin aged about 30, with straight brown hair receding from his high forehead and long side-whiskers, smiling quietly, in wide lapelled jacket, waistcoat and high collar with cravat.
While still a young man, Charles Darwin joined the scientific elite
.When the Beagle reached Falmouth, Cornwall, on 2 October 1836, Darwin was already a celebrity in scientific circles as in December 1835 Henslow had fostered his former pupil's reputation by giving selected naturalists a pamphlet of Darwin's geological letters.^ While healthy as a youth, after his 1831-1836 voyage on HMS Beagle , Charles Darwin was chronically ill, having contracted what was eventually termed Chagas Disease.
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^ The British naturalist Charles Darwin, traveling aboard HMS Beagle, spent six weeks studying the animal life of the Galpagos.
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^ Darwin was not the first choice of naturalist on the HMS Beagle.
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[54] .Darwin visited his home in Shrewsbury and saw relatives, then hurried to Cambridge to see Henslow, who advised on finding naturalists available to catalogue the collections and agreed to take on the botanical specimens.^ In time Henslow saw that Darwin was a young gentleman who had great potential as a naturalist.
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^ After visiting his home in Shrewsbury and seeing relatives, Darwin hurried to Cambridge to see Henslow, who advised on finding naturalists available to describe and catalogue the collections, and agreed to take on the botanical specimens.
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^ Before leaving Cambridge Darwin went, at Henslow's suggestion, on a geology field trip to North Wales with the famous, and also very religious, Professor Adam Sedgwick, who found Darwin to be an easily distracted student, but taught him some important principles of rock study and collection.

.Darwin's father organised investments, enabling his son to be a self-funded gentleman scientist, and an excited Darwin went round the London institutions being fêted and seeking experts to describe the collections.^ Consider, if you will, the 1994 collection of essays entitled Evidence of Purpose: Scientists Discover Creativity which includes several references to Darwin's Origin from several contributors.
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^ On the following day Darwin went off to see Henslow in Cambridge and on the 5th of September 1831 he met with Captain Robert FitzRoy in London.
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.Zoologists had a huge backlog of work, and there was a danger of specimens just being left in storage.^ Zoologists had a huge backlog of work, and there was a danger of specimens just being left in storage.
  • Charles Darwin - Paleontology Wiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC paleontology.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Charles Darwin - Hwiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC hwiki.fzk.de [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Indeed, not just a myth, but a dangerous idea that retards knowledge and causes human beings lots of trouble.
  • Darwin's brightest hour - Cosmic Log - msnbc.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com [Source type: Original source]

[55]
.Charles Lyell eagerly met Darwin for the first time on 29 October and soon introduced him to the up-and-coming anatomist Richard Owen, who had the facilities of the Royal College of Surgeons to work on the fossil bones collected by Darwin.^ Lyell gave Darwin (and others who read his works) the gift of time.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ An outstanding scientist who excelled first as an observer and later as a theorist and experimenter, he was also a singularly attractive character beloved by family and colleagues alike" (John Bowlby, 1990, Charles Darwin: A New Life , page 1).
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There have been those who have written that Darwin greatly influenced those around him and that he brought forth ideas which were to revolutionize the times from 1859 until this century.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Owen's surprising results included other gigantic extinct ground sloths as well as the Megatherium, a near complete skeleton of the unknown Scelidotherium and a hippopotamus-sized rodent-like skull named Toxodon resembling a giant capybara.^ We know well that being the kind of person she was, so he was likely to have arranged something, and holding meetings near Downe is very likely.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Fossils prove the sudden emergence of a new species out of nowhere, complete with characteristics unknown in any other species.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

The armour fragments were actually from Glyptodon, a huge armadillo-like creature as Darwin had initially thought.[56][35] .These extinct creatures were related to living species in South America.^ This concept is based on the suggestion that those members of a species that are a little stronger, a little larger, or run a little faster will live longer to procreate offspring with these superior adaptations.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He noted, for example, that certain fossils of supposedly extinct species closely resembled living species in the same geographical area.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These natives, as well as a missionary, were being transported out to that southernmost part of the continent of South America.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[57]
.In mid-December Darwin took lodgings in Cambridge to organise work on his collections and rewrite his Journal.^ After graduating from Cambridge University in 1831, Charles Darwin took his trip around the world on HMS Beagle and in 1876, at the age of sixty-eight, Darwin wrote his Autobiography.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[58] .He wrote his first paper, showing that the South American landmass was slowly rising, and with Lyell's enthusiastic backing read it to the Geological Society of London on 4 January 1837. On the same day, he presented his mammal and bird specimens to the Zoological Society.^ He communicated several papers to the Zoological Society.
  • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ "On 1 July 1858 Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace made the first public statement of their theory of evolution by natural selection before the Linnaean Society of London, and their papers were published on 20 August of the same year.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Prior to his marriage in January of 1839, Darwin was appointed Secretary of the Geological Society of London on the 16th of February 1838, a position he held until his health was too poor to allow him to go on any further expeditions.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The ornithologist John Gould soon announced that the Galapagos birds that Darwin had thought a mixture of blackbirds, "gros-beaks" and finches, were, in fact, twelve separate species of finches.^ HMS Beagle departed the Galápagos and headed across the Pacific Ocean to Australia, then across the Indian Ocean, and back to England, and the "mixed-up finches" were handed over to John Gould, an ornithologist.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ On a voyage to the Galpagos Islands off the western coast of South America, Darwin saw more than a dozen different species of finches living on various islands.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The islands contain as many as 85 different species of birds, including flamingos, flightless cormorants, finches, and penguins.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.On 17 February Darwin was elected to the Council of the Geological Society, and Lyell's presidential address presented Owen's findings on Darwin's fossils, stressing geographical continuity of species as supporting his uniformitarian ideas.^ Charles Darwin admitted that fossils of the transitional links between species would have to be found in order to prove his "Theory of Evolution."
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Perhaps some of the sea creatures survived this chaotic period, because we find ancient fossils that appear to be identical to some modern species, such as sharks.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Darwin had been actively and openly supporting evolution continuously since 1858.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[59]
.Early in March, Darwin moved to London to be near this work, joining Lyell's social circle of scientists and experts such as Charles Babbage,[60] who described God as a programmer of laws.^ An outstanding scientist who excelled first as an observer and later as a theorist and experimenter, he was also a singularly attractive character beloved by family and colleagues alike" (John Bowlby, 1990, Charles Darwin: A New Life , page 1).
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Earlier I mentioned a 20th century author who declared that the "political and social temper of English life" in Darwin's times was conservative [Jay E. Greene, 1964, 100 Great Scientists , page 264].
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It is fortunate that opinions change over time since it was the first volume of Sir Charles Lyell's work on geology that Darwin took with him on his voyage on the HMS Beagle around the world in 1831-1836.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.John Herschel's letter on the "mystery of mysteries" of new species was widely discussed, with explanations sought in laws of nature, not ad hoc miracles.^ Natural Selection (43) I have heard by round about channel that Herschel says my book 'is the law of higgledy-pigglety.'
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ New species cannot evolve by natural selection.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ They had corresponded earlier in the 1850s when Wallace was in Malaysia and upon the 1855 publication of Wallace's article entitled "On the Law which has regulated the Introduction of New Species" (in The Annals And Magazine Of Natural History ).
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.Darwin stayed with his freethinking brother Erasmus, part of this Whig circle and close friend of writer Harriet Martineau who promoted Malthusianism underlying the controversial Whig Poor Law reforms to stop welfare from causing overpopulation and more poverty.^ Charles Darwin's brother, Erasmus Darwin (named after their paternal grandfather, the eminent physician Erasmus Darwin (1731-1802) had a tremendous amount of influence on Charles Darwin.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He read and agreed with the work of his brother's girl friend, Harriet Martineau, who held that "right" and "wrong" are culturally conditioned, not spiritual endowments.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ When Darwin finally met FitzRoy, he discovered that not only had his father been opposed to his taking the trip, but Captain FitzRoy, who was all of twenty-six years of age to Darwin's twenty-two, almost caused him to stay behind as well.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

As a Unitarian she welcomed the radical implications of transmutation of species, promoted by Grant and younger surgeons influenced by Geoffroy, but anathema to Anglicans defending social order.[51][61]
In their first meeting to discuss his detailed findings, Gould told Darwin that the Galápagos mockingbirds from different islands were separate species, not just varieties, and the finch group included the "wrens". .Darwin had not labelled the finches by island, but from the notes of others on the Beagle, including FitzRoy, he allocated species to islands.^ Others on the Beagle , including FitzRoy, had also collected these birds and had been more careful with their notes, enabling Darwin to determine from which island each species had come.
  • Charles Darwin - encyclopedia article - Citizendium 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC en.citizendium.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ By mid March, Darwin was convinced that creatures arriving in the islands had become altered in some way to form new species on the different islands, and investigated transmutation while noting his speculations in his "Red Notebook" which he had begun on the Beagle .
  • Charles Darwin - Paleontology Wiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC paleontology.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The ornithologist John Gould soon revealed that the Galapagos birds that Darwin had thought a mixture of blackbirds , " gross-beaks " and finches , were, in fact, twelve separate species of finches .
  • Charles Darwin - Paleontology Wiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC paleontology.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[62] .The two rheas were also distinct species, and on 14 March Darwin announced how their distribution changed going southwards.^ Over long periods the character of a species can change, or two species may emerge from a common ancestor.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Both observations raised the question, for Darwin, of possible links between distinct but similar species.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ How would Darwin change if he were to publish Origin right now?
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[63]
A page of hand-written notes, with a sketch of branching lines.
In mid-July 1837 Darwin started his "B" notebook on Transmutation of Species, and on page 36 wrote "I think" above his first evolutionary tree.
.By mid-March, Darwin was speculating in his Red Notebook on the possibility that "one species does change into another" to explain the geographical distribution of living species such as the rheas, and extinct ones such as the strange Macrauchenia which resembled a giant guanaco.^ Darwin's theory suggests that millions of generations later the changes will result in new species.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ "In "Darwin's Black Box," Dr. Behe addresses but one issue - whether evolutionary theory can adequately explain the "enormous complexity" found within the living cell.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Each species is locked into its chromosome count that cannot be changed.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

His thoughts on lifespan, asexual reproduction and sexual reproduction developed in his "B" notebook around mid-July on to variation in offspring "to adapt & alter the race to changing world" explaining the Galápagos tortoises, mockingbirds and rheas. .He sketched branching descent, then a genealogical branching of a single evolutionary tree, in which "It is absurd to talk of one animal being higher than another", discarding Lamarck's independent lineages progressing to higher forms.^ This progression is an uninterrupted branch of the "evolutionary tree."
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I was pretty surprised that the man who pioneered evolutionary science didn't want his own family tree to branch out and married his cousin.
  • 10 Fun Facts About Charles Darwin - Neatorama 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.neatorama.com [Source type: General]

^ Because natural resources form on a geologic time scale, the rate at which they are naturally replenished is far slower than the rate at which they are currently being depleted.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[64]

Overwork, illness, and marriage

.While developing this intensive study of transmutation, Darwin became mired in more work.^ Since Darwin's study little work on the evolution of the special mechanisms of plants and their animal pollen vectors had been accomplished.
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^ Child Development : In the late 19th century, interest in the characteristics and needs of children produced more systematic efforts to study their development.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ During the 19th century, comparative anatomy studies helped British scientist Charles Darwin to develop the modern theory of evolution.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Still rewriting his Journal, he took on editing and publishing the expert reports on his collections, and with Henslow's help obtained a Treasury grant of £1,000 to sponsor this multi-volume Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S. Beagle, a sum equivalent to about £75,000 in present day terms.^ Darwin edited his journals from the explorations and published them in 1839 as The Voyage of the Beagle .
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Darwin wrote in the first published account on the voyage of the HMS Beagle in 1839: .
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ While healthy as a youth, after his 1831-1836 voyage on HMS Beagle , Charles Darwin was chronically ill, having contracted what was eventually termed Chagas Disease.
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[65] He stretched the funding to include his planned books on geology, and agreed unrealistic dates with the publisher.[66] .As the Victorian era began, Darwin pressed on with writing his Journal, and in August 1837 began correcting printer's proofs.^ This is what Darwin began to think about when he opened that notebook for the Origin in July of 1837.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Charles R. Darwin was conducting research and writing until the 73rd year of his life and it was during this winter of 1881-1882 that his heart began to give him problems.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[67]
Darwin's health suffered from the pressure. .On 20 September he had "an uncomfortable palpitation of the heart", so his doctors urged him to "knock off all work" and live in the country for a few weeks.^ He cared for all our pursuits and interests, and lived our lives with us in a way that very few fathers do.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ All this dissolves as he works his way into the living concerns of practicing scientists.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

After visiting Shrewsbury he joined his Wedgwood relatives at Maer Hall, Staffordshire, but found them too eager for tales of his travels to give him much rest. .His charming, intelligent, and cultured cousin Emma Wedgwood, nine months older than Darwin, was nursing his invalid aunt.^ He courted in 1838 (and in 1839 married) his cousin Emma Wedgwood, a devout Christian, and opened his heart to her about his increasing unorthdoxy on religious issues.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ But Darwin was not to know that things would turn out like this, with Emma (when she saw his behaviour) perhaps less warm than expected.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Darwins Cousin Measures Intelligence (Psychometrics) : Sir Francis Galton, a cousin of [British scientist] Charles Darwin, made the first scientific attempt to measure intelligence.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.His uncle Jos pointed out an area of ground where cinders had disappeared under loam and suggested that this might have been the work of earthworms, inspiring "a new & important theory" on their role in soil formation which Darwin presented at the Geological Society on 1 November.^ His father was opposed to Darwin taking part in the voyage and Darwin would have followed his father's wishes not to go on the voyage had not his uncle, Jos Wedgwood, interceded for him and convinced his father to allow him to go.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Darwin's theory suggests that millions of generations later the changes will result in new species.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Charles Darwin affectionately called Emma's father "Uncle Jos" since they were related through his maternal grandfather.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[68]
.William Whewell pushed Darwin to take on the duties of Secretary of the Geological Society.^ Prior to his marriage in January of 1839, Darwin was appointed Secretary of the Geological Society of London on the 16th of February 1838, a position he held until his health was too poor to allow him to go on any further expeditions.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Darwin was fundamentally a geologist at this time, and specimens sent home were presented to the Geological Society by his mentors Henslow and Sedgwick.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

.After initially declining the work, he accepted the post in March 1838.[69] Despite the grind of writing and editing the Beagle reports, Darwin made remarkable progress on transmutation, taking every opportunity to question expert naturalists and, unconventionally, people with practical experience such as farmers and pigeon fanciers.^ "In the Origin Darwin tried to avoid extending his biological explanations into social and moral questions, but the extension was unavoidable and he made it himself in The Descent of Man.
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^ Darwin was not the first choice of naturalist on the HMS Beagle.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Thus, Darwin could notice behavioral variations in pigeons and use them in a theory of the evolution of mind because he was at once the pigeon fancier, the evolutionist, and the materialist."
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[3][70] .Over time his research drew on information from his relatives and children, the family butler, neighbours, colonists and former shipmates.^ Over time his research drew on information from his relatives and children, the family butler, neighbours, colonists and former shipmates.
  • Charles Darwin - Paleontology Wiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC paleontology.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Charles Darwin - Hwiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC hwiki.fzk.de [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ We were able to research the archival records, and also work with our relatives, our older relatives to garner both the family stories and the records from that time, and from that we were able to reconstruct a biography of her life.
  • The Spirit of Things - 15 November 2009 - Charles Darwin: the Body and the Soul 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.abc.net.au [Source type: Original source]

[71] .He included mankind in his speculations from the outset, and on seeing an orangutan in the zoo on 28 March 1838 noted its child-like behaviour.^ Template:Harvnb He included mankind in his speculations from the outset, and on seeing an ape in the zoo on 28 March 1838 noted its child-like behaviour.
  • Charles Darwin - Hwiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC hwiki.fzk.de [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He included mankind in his speculations from the outset, and on seeing an ape in the zoo on 28 March 1838 noted its child-like behaviour.
  • Charles Darwin - Paleontology Wiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC paleontology.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ On 28 September 1838 he noted this insight, describing it as a kind of wedging, forcing adapted structures into gaps in the economy of nature as weaker structures were thrust out.
  • Charles Darwin - Paleontology Wiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC paleontology.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[72]
The strain took a toll, and by June he was being laid up for days on end with stomach problems, headaches and heart symptoms. .For the rest of his life, he was repeatedly incapacitated with episodes of stomach pains, vomiting, severe boils, palpitations, trembling and other symptoms, particularly during times of stress such as attending meetings or making social visits.^ There were many social and cultural changes during this time.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Finally, realizing the earths age makes habitat preservation and other environmental issues particularly relevant.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ During that period white elites openly subscribed to white supremacist theories, such as British philosopher Herbert Spencers version of social Darwinism (see Eugenics).
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The cause of Darwin's illness remained unknown, and attempts at treatment had little success.^ The paper caused little stir, but now Darwin was feverishly preparing a small book.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[73]
On 23 June he took a break and went "geologising" in Scotland. .He visited Glen Roy in glorious weather to see the parallel "roads" cut into the hillsides at three heights.^ He continued to argue in the 1850's that the parallel "roads" around Glen Roy were raised marine beaches long after the evidence of glacial causality was obvious, and in spite of obvious glacial remains at the valley head.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

.He later published his view that these were marine raised beaches, but then had to accept that they were shorelines of a proglacial lake.^ He had been advised by Henslow to get and read Lyell's newly published Principles of Geology but "on no account to accept the views therein advocated."
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[74]
.Fully recuperated, he returned to Shrewsbury in July.^ Fully recuperated, he returned to Shrewsbury in July.
  • Charles Darwin - Paleontology Wiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC paleontology.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Used to jotting down daily notes on animal breeding, he scrawled rambling thoughts about career and prospects on two scraps of paper, one with columns headed "Marry" and "Not Marry".^ With that in mind, it is worth noting that since the "paper" version of this paper was initially completed and distributed on January 31, 1995, it was exactly 156 years ago that date (January 31, 1839) that Charles Darwin had been married to Emma Darwin (née Emma ) for exactly two days.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Each person makes a different set of decisions about the use of his [or her] personal resources, thereby setting the scene for the fortunate accidents of thought that occur and choosing among them when they do.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ One 20th Century author has written about his father's choice of career for Charles Darwin: .
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.Advantages included "constant companion and a friend in old age ...^ God (121) This is the question Marry Children(if it Please God)Constant companion (& friend in old age) who will feel interested in oneobject to be beloved and played withbetter than a dog anyhow.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

better than a dog anyhow", against points such as "less money for books" and "terrible loss of time."[75] .Having decided in favour, he discussed it with his father, then went to visit Emma on 29 July.^ He discussed the prospect of marriage with his father then went to visit his cousin Emma on 29 July, 1838.
  • Charles Darwin - encyclopedia article - Citizendium 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC en.citizendium.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He had a discussion with his father about the prospect of marriage then went to visit his cousin Emma on 29 July 1838.

^ Template:Harvnb Having decided in favour, he discussed it with his father then went to visit Emma on 29 July 1838 .
  • Charles Darwin - Hwiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC hwiki.fzk.de [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

He did not get around to proposing, but against his father's advice he mentioned his ideas on transmutation.[76]
Continuing his research in London, Darwin's wide reading now included the sixth edition of Malthus's An Essay on the Principle of Population
.In October 1838, that is, fifteen months after I had begun my systematic enquiry, I happened to read for amusement Malthus on Population, and being well prepared to appreciate the struggle for existence which everywhere goes on from long-continued observation of the habits of animals and plants, it at once struck me that under these circumstances favourable variations would tend to be preserved, and unfavourable ones to be destroyed.^ "In October, 1838, that is fifteen months after I had begun my systematic enquiry, I happened to read for amusement Malthus on Population, and being well prepared to appreciate the struggle for existence which everywhere goes on from long-continued observation of the habits of animals and plants, it at once struck me that UNDER THESE CIRCUMSTANCES FAVOURABLE VARIATIONS WOULD TEND TO BE PRESERVED, AND UNFAVORABLE ONES TO BE DESTROYED. The result of this would be the formation of a new species.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Not only did Darwin receive "support" or inspiration from Malthus' ideas on the struggle amongst populations, and Lyell's ideas on gradual development in geology, but the authority of the Christian Bible itself was being challenged by independent biblical scholars.
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^ In the review of Quetelet, he found, among other things, a forceful statement of Malthus's quantitative claim--that population would grow geometrically and food supplies only arithmetically, thus guaranteeing an intense struggle for existence.
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.The result of this would be the formation of new species.^ This would result in the formation of new species.
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^ The result of this would be the formation of new species.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The result would be the formation of new species.

.Here, then, I had at last got a theory by which to work...^ Here then I had at last got a theory by which to work; but I was so anxious to avoid prejudice, that I determined not for some time to write even the briefest sketch of it.
  • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Here, then, I had at last got a theory by which to work; but I was so anxious to avoid prejudice, that I determined not for some time to write even the briefest sketch of it.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I had at last got a theory by which to work.
  • Charles Darwin -- The Origins of Doubt 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.godweb.org [Source type: Original source]

[77]
.Malthus asserted that unless human population is kept in check, it increases in a geometrical progression and soon exceeds food supply in what is known as a Malthusian catastrophe.^ Malthus saw population increasing over time at a geometric rate: 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, etc.
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^ In the review of Quetelet, he found, among other things, a forceful statement of Malthus's quantitative claim--that population would grow geometrically and food supplies only arithmetically, thus guaranteeing an intense struggle for existence.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Reverend Malthus was observing the unbridled checks of the Industrial Revolution in England: technology was rampant, population was increasing, and there were problems in the world.
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[3] .Darwin was well prepared to see at once that this also applied to de Candolle's "warring of the species" of plants and the struggle for existence among wildlife, explaining how numbers of a species kept roughly stable.^ "In October, 1838, that is fifteen months after I had begun my systematic enquiry, I happened to read for amusement Malthus on Population, and being well prepared to appreciate the struggle for existence which everywhere goes on from long-continued observation of the habits of animals and plants, it at once struck me that UNDER THESE CIRCUMSTANCES FAVOURABLE VARIATIONS WOULD TEND TO BE PRESERVED, AND UNFAVORABLE ONES TO BE DESTROYED. The result of this would be the formation of a new species.
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^ Since Darwin's study little work on the evolution of the special mechanisms of plants and their animal pollen vectors had been accomplished.
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^ Darwin did not address human evolution in his most famous study : On the Origin of Species (1859) which focused on the evolution of plants and animals.
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.As species always breed beyond available resources, favourable variations would make organisms better at surviving and passing the variations on to their offspring, while unfavourable variations would be lost.^ As species always breed beyond available resources, favourable variations would make organisms better at surviving and passing the variations on to their offspring, while unfavourable variations would be lost.
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^ And genes aren't passed only from parent to offspring; they can also be passed between individuals, even individuals of different species.
  • What Darwin Didn't Know | Science & Nature | Smithsonian Magazine 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Animals that survive to breed must have made it through a process of selection and therefore must be slightly better suited to their environment than other individuals.

.This would result in the formation of new species.^ This would result in the formation of new species.
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^ The result of this would be the formation of new species.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The result would be the formation of new species.

[3][78] .On 28 September 1838 he noted this insight, describing it as a kind of wedging, forcing adapted structures into gaps in the economy of nature as weaker structures were thrust out.^ On 28 September 1838 he noted this insight, describing it as a kind of wedging, forcing adapted structures into gaps in the economy of nature as weaker structures were thrust out.
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^ Template:Harvnb Template:Harvnb Template:Harvnb On 28 September 1838 he noted this insight, describing it as a kind of wedging, forcing adapted structures into gaps in the economy of nature as weaker structures were thrust out.
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^ For although natural selection is the only creative force in evolution — the only one that can produce complex structures such as wings and eyes — it is not the only force that affects which genes will spread, and which will vanish.
  • Let’s Get Rid of Darwinism - Opinionator Blog - NYTimes.com 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC judson.blogs.nytimes.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[3] By mid December he saw a similarity between farmers picking the best breeding stock and a Malthusian Nature selecting from chance variants so that "every part of newly acquired structure is fully practical and perfected",[79] thinking this comparison "a beautiful part of my theory".[80]
Three quarter length portrait of woman aged about 30, with dark hair in centre parting straight on top, then falling in curls on each side. She smiles pleasantly and is wearing an open necked blouse with a large shawl pulled over her arms
Darwin chose to marry his cousin, Emma Wedgwood.
.On 11 November, he returned to Maer and proposed to Emma, once more telling her his ideas.^ On 11 November he returned and proposed to Emma, once more telling her his ideas.
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^ On 11 November , he returned to Maer and proposed to Emma, once more telling her his ideas.
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^ On 11 November 1838, which Darwin called 'the day of days', his cousin Emma Wedgwood agreed to marry him.

.She accepted, then in exchanges of loving letters she showed how she valued his openness in sharing their differences, also expressing her strong Unitarian beliefs and concerns that his honest doubts might separate them in the afterlife.^ The flat strata around Bath where he lived showed fairly clearly how different fossils appeared at different layers.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[81] .While he was house-hunting in London, bouts of illness continued and Emma wrote urging him to get some rest, almost prophetically remarking "So don't be ill any more my dear Charley till I can be with you to nurse you."^ Then you have not seen my summer house.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ So it was arranged that I should call at three P.M. I should like to give you my impressions when I first saw him.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Such "sketches" in their own right were massive publications and, concerning the second sketch, Darwin wrote to Emma on 5 July 1844: "I have just finished my sketch of my species theory.
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.He found what they called "Macaw Cottage" (because of its gaudy interiors) in Gower Street, then moved his "museum" in over Christmas.^ The twenty-third pair consists of the sex chromosomes, so called because they are the primary factor in determining the gender of a child.
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.On 24 January 1839 Darwin was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.^ Jan, 1839 : Charles Darwin was elected Fellow of the Royal Society.
  • Darwin Country - Darwin, Charles (1809-82) 1: his youthful years 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.darwincountry.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ On 24 January, 1839 he was honoured by being elected as Fellow of the Royal Society and presented his paper on the Roads of Glen Roy.
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^ On 24 January 1839 he was honoured by being elected as Fellow of the Royal Society and presented his paper on the Roads of Glen Roy.

[82]
.On 29 January Darwin and Emma Wedgwood were married at Maer in an Anglican ceremony arranged to suit the Unitarians, then immediately caught the train to London and their new home.^ Charles Darwin married his first cousin Emma Wedgwood.
  • Darwin Country - Darwin, Charles (1809-82) 1: his youthful years 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.darwincountry.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Charles Darwin married his first cousin Emma Wedgwood on January 29th 1839.

^ Emma Wedgwood and Charles Darwin were married on January 29, 1839 and resided in London from that year until 1842.
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[83]

Preparing the theory of natural selection for publication

.Darwin now had the framework of his theory of natural selection "by which to work",[84] as his "prime hobby".[85] His research included animal husbandry and extensive experiments with plants, finding evidence that species were not fixed and investigating many detailed ideas to refine and substantiate his theory.^ Charles Darwin had concern about his theory of natural selection.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The evidence is overwhelming that Darwin had been collecting information on changes within species for numerous years and he started his serious note-taking on the theory of evolution on September 28, 1838, "when he wrote down his first clear statement of the principle of evolution through natural selection [Howard Gruber, 1974, Darwin On Man: A Psychological Study Of Creativity , page 261]."
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^ "When Darwin deduced the theory of natural selection to explain the adaptations in which he had previously seen the handiwork of God, he knew that he was committing cultural murder.
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[3] .For fifteen years this work was in the background to his main occupation of writing on geology and publishing expert reports on the Beagle collections.^ Published notebooks containing meticulous observations of animal and plant species and geology made during the Beagle voyage.
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[86]
.When FitzRoy's Narrative was published in May 1839, Darwin's Journal and Remarks was such a success as the third volume that later that year it was published on its own.^ Darwin edited his journals from the explorations and published them in 1839 as The Voyage of the Beagle .
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^ Darwin wrote in the first published account on the voyage of the HMS Beagle in 1839: .
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^ The next year, Darwin published On the Origin of Species , the book that made the theory of natural selection famous.
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[87] Early in 1842, Darwin wrote about his ideas to Charles Lyell, who noted that his ally "denies seeing a beginning to each crop of species".[88]
.Darwin's book The Structure and Distribution of Coral Reefs on his theory of atoll formation was published in May 1842 after more than three years of work, and he then wrote his first "pencil sketch" of his theory of natural selection.^ The next year, Darwin published On the Origin of Species , the book that made the theory of natural selection famous.
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^ The next year, Darwin published On the Origin of Species, the book that made the theory of natural selection famous.
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^ Known for: Proposing the theory of natural selection .
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[89] .To escape the pressures of London, the family moved to rural Down House in September.^ He married his first cousin, Emma Wedgwood, and soon after moved to a small estate, Down House, outside London.
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^ On September 14, 1842, the Darwin family moved to the village of Down in Kent, sixteen miles southeast of London.
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^ In 1839 he married his first cousin, Emma Wedgwood, and soon after moved to a small estate, Down House, outside London.
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[90] .On 11 January 1844 Darwin mentioned his theorising to the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker, writing with melodramatic humour "it is like confessing a murder".[91][92] Hooker replied "There may in my opinion have been a series of productions on different spots, & also a gradual change of species.^ Charles Darwin Letter to Sir Joseph Hooker (11 Jan 1844).
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In early 1844 Darwin communicated some of his ideas on transmutation to the young botanist Joseph Hooker, newly back from a stint as assistant surgeon on a navy vessel (the mid decks equivalent of Darwin's trip open to poorer men like Hooker and T H Huxley to further their scientific careers).
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Taste (5) At last gleams of light have come, and I am almost convinced (quite contrary to opinion I started with) that species are not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

.I shall be delighted to hear how you think that this change may have taken place, as no presently conceived opinions satisfy me on the subject."^ Not only did he change the course of biological science but he changed for ever how philosophers and theologians conceive of man's place in nature.
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[93]
Path covered in sandy gravel winding through open woodland, with plants and shrubs growing on each side of the path.
Darwin's "sandwalk" at Down House was his usual "Thinking Path".[94]
.By July, Darwin had expanded his "sketch" into a 230-page "Essay", to be expanded with his research results if he died prematurely.^ Darwin would probably do some things differently and some things the same but he would definitely incorporate information on genetics and Deoxyribonucleic research into a 1990s Origin .
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^ By 1844 Darwin had enlarged his notes into a sketch of the conclusions he thought probable and those notes and research resulted in the 1859 Origin .
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^ Such "sketches" in their own right were massive publications and, concerning the second sketch, Darwin wrote to Emma on 5 July 1844: "I have just finished my sketch of my species theory.
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[95] .In November the anonymously published sensational best-seller Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation brought wide interest in transmutation.^ An academic degree, however, combined with an interest in natural history, and a professorial recommendation were almost not sufficient for Charles Darwin to go on the HMS Beagle .
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^ Darwin began his interests in natural history while a student at Cambridge and while there, it was Professor Henslow who persuaded him to become interested in Geology, after his disastrous Edinburgh experiences.
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.Darwin scorned its amateurish geology and zoology, but carefully reviewed his own arguments.^ Darwin was already planning a future as a naturalist and took a course in Geology in his own time.

^ The data that Darwin collected, the experiments he conducted, and the theories he proposed influenced a variety of disciplines from anthropology to zoology, including ecology, geology, and the general social sciences.
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Controversy erupted, and it continued to sell well despite contemptuous dismissal by scientists.[96][97]
.Darwin completed his third geological book in 1846. He now renewed a fascination and expertise in marine invertebrates, dating back to his student days with Grant, by dissecting and classifying the barnacles he had collected on the voyage, enjoying observing beautiful structures and thinking about comparisons with allied structures.^ These and other structures were made by man and date back approximately 4,500 years.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ This is what Darwin began to think about when he opened that notebook for the Origin in July of 1837.
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^ Pollination Puzzle Solved : A scientific question dating back to the days of Darwin seems to have been answered.
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[98] .In 1847, Hooker read the "Essay" and sent notes that provided Darwin with the calm critical feedback that he needed, but would not commit himself and questioned Darwin's opposition to continuing acts of creation.^ "In the Origin Darwin tried to avoid extending his biological explanations into social and moral questions, but the extension was unavoidable and he made it himself in The Descent of Man.
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^ Darwin claimed that in 1838 the reading of Malthus essay on population pressures triggered his recognition that "natural selection" was the evolutionary mechanism he had been looking for.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Darwin , as requested, sent it on to Lyell, but with a note bewailing his dilemma.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[99]
In an attempt to improve his chronic ill health, Darwin went in 1849 to Dr. James Gully's Malvern spa and was surprised to find some benefit from hydrotherapy.[100] .Then in 1851 his treasured daughter Annie fell ill, reawakening his fears that his illness might be hereditary, and after a long series of crises she died.^ The death in 1851 of his favorite daughter Annie (aged ten) destroyed any vestige of belief in a benevolent creator: .
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[101]
.In eight years of work on barnacles (Cirripedia), Darwin's theory helped him to find "homologies" showing that slightly changed body parts served different functions to meet new conditions, and in some genera he found minute males parasitic on hermaphrodites, showing an intermediate stage in evolution of distinct sexes.^ His father was opposed to Darwin taking part in the voyage and Darwin would have followed his father's wishes not to go on the voyage had not his uncle, Jos Wedgwood, interceded for him and convinced his father to allow him to go.
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^ This is simply another forgery by evolutionists in a desperate attempt to prove Darwin's Theory of Evolution.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Darwin's theory suggests that millions of generations later the changes will result in new species.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[102] .In 1853 it earned him the Royal Society's Royal Medal, and it made his reputation as a biologist.^ Returning to England in 1850, Huxley was made a fellow of the Royal Society.
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^ His other distinctions included the Darwin Medal of the Royal Society (1890), the Copley Medal of the Royal Society (1908), and the Order of Merit (1908).
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[103] He resumed work on his theory of species in 1854, and in November realised that divergence in the character of descendants could be explained by them becoming adapted to "diversified places in the economy of nature".[104]

Publication of the theory of natural selection

Head and shoulders portrait of a balding Darwin looking rather grim and slightly startled.
Darwin was forced into swift publication of his theory of natural selection.
.By the start of 1856, Darwin was investigating whether eggs and seeds could survive travel across seawater to spread species across oceans.^ Darwin's qualms as he thought about ordination were not about orthodoxy, but about whether he could really, when asked in the ordination service, claim that he had been "inwardly moved by the Holy Spirit" to ordination.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

.Hooker increasingly doubted the traditional view that species were fixed, but their young friend Thomas Henry Huxley was firmly against evolution.^ STRESS added]" (Cyril Bibby, 1972, Scientist Extraordinary: The Life And Scientific Work Of Thomas Henry Huxley 1825-1895 , page 40).
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^ Thomas Henry Huxley a rising force in science and virulently anti-clerical embraced the theory.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Bilby, Cyril, 1972 ,S cientist Extraordinary: The Life and Scientific Work of Thomas Henry Huxley 1825-1895 .
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Lyell was intrigued by Darwin's speculations without realising their extent. .When he read a paper by Alfred Russel Wallace on the Introduction of species, he saw similarities with Darwin's thoughts and urged him to publish to establish precedence.^ Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913).
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^ In 1944, Richard Hofstadter published Social Darwinism In American Thought and his fifty-two year old statement is as true and relevant today as it was in 1944: .
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^ "On 1 July 1858 Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace made the first public statement of their theory of evolution by natural selection before the Linnaean Society of London, and their papers were published on 20 August of the same year.
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.Though Darwin saw no threat, he began work on a short paper.^ Though Darwin saw no threat, he began work on a short paper.
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  • Charles Darwin - Hwiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC hwiki.fzk.de [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In Australia , the marsupial rat-kangaroo and the platypus seemed so unusual that Darwin thought it was almost as though two distinct Creators had been at work.
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^ Charles Darwin began work on On the various contrivances by which British and foreign orchids are fertilised by insects, and on the good effects of intercrossing.
  • Darwin Country - Darwin, Charles (1809-82) 1: his youthful years 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.darwincountry.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Finding answers to difficult questions held him up repeatedly, and he expanded his plans to a "big book on species" titled Natural Selection.^ He was working on his big book on natural selection, but was not yet ready to publish.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The next year, Darwin published On the Origin of Species , the book that made the theory of natural selection famous.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ "The idea that evolution by natural selection could account for the origin of man was taken up by others as a direct result of Darwin's ideas.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.He continued his researches, obtaining information and specimens from naturalists worldwide including Wallace who was working in Borneo.^ These four individuals also contributed to the work of Alfred Russel Wallace, who was ALSO inspired by a reading of Malthus while employed as a naturalist in the Malay states in the 1850s.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The American botanist Asa Gray showed similar interests, and on 5 September 1857 Darwin sent Gray a detailed outline of his ideas including an abstract of Natural Selection.^ Gray, Asa (1861) Natural Selection Trubner .
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ As well as Hooker, the evangelical American botanist Asa Gray now also knew of Darwin 's ideas in a detailed letter but was sworn to secrecy.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ An academic degree, however, combined with an interest in natural history, and a professorial recommendation were almost not sufficient for Charles Darwin to go on the HMS Beagle .
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In December, Darwin received a letter from Wallace asking if the book would examine human origins.^ In December 1857, Darwin received a letter from Wallace asking if the book would examine human origins.
  • Charles Darwin - Paleontology Wiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC paleontology.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
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^ In June 1858 Alfred Russel Wallace sent Darwin a letter presenting a summary of the very views Darwin had formed twenty years earlier.
  • Charles Darwin - AbeBooks 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.abebooks.com [Source type: General]

^ Books examine origins of Darwin Vernon Morning Star, July 5, 2009 ...Vernon Morning Star Okanagan Similkameen Text The celebration of Charles Darwin ?s 200th birthday is continuing throughout this year, as is the arrival of new books about the great naturalist.
  • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

.He responded that he would avoid that subject, "so surrounded with prejudices", while encouraging Wallace's theorising and adding that "I go much further than you."^ From Dorking she would go further a field.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ "Dr Darwin has heard that you are here; and he would like very much to see you.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[105]
.Darwin's book was half way when, on 18 June 1858, he received a paper from Wallace describing natural selection.^ The next year, Darwin published On the Origin of Species , the book that made the theory of natural selection famous.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ "When Darwin deduced the theory of natural selection to explain the adaptations in which he had previously seen the handiwork of God, he knew that he was committing cultural murder.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The body and soul of Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution was his idea that evolution was made possible through natural selection.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

.Shocked that he had been "forestalled", Darwin sent it on to Lyell, as requested, and, though Wallace had not asked for publication, he suggested he would send it to any journal that Wallace chose.^ Darwin , as requested, sent it on to Lyell, but with a note bewailing his dilemma.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He had written a paper that, in essential outline, gave all the elements of Darwin 's theory and he unknowingly chose Darwin to send it to in the hopes of publication!
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1858, while still on his Malaysian journey, Wallace wrote a paper describing his theory and sent it to Darwin.
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.His family was in crisis with children in the village dying of scarlet fever, and he put matters in the hands of Lyell and Hooker.^ Neither Wallace nor Darwin were present at the meeting: Wallace was still in Malaysia and Charles Darwin was in the village of Down, where Emma and Charles Darwin's child (Charles Waring [1856-1858]) had just died from scarlet fever.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.They decided on a joint presentation at the Linnean Society on 1 July of On the Tendency of Species to form Varieties; and on the Perpetuation of Varieties and Species by Natural Means of Selection; however, Darwin's baby son died of the scarlet fever and he was too distraught to attend.^ The joint Darwin and Wallace paper (with Darwin as first author) was entitled "On the tendency of species to form varieties and on the perpetuation of varieties and species by natural means of selection."
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ British naturalist Alfred Wallace independently conceived a theory of natural selection identical to Darwin's; both Darwin's and Wallace's theories were presented on the same day in 1858 to the Linnean Society of London.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ An academic degree, however, combined with an interest in natural history, and a professorial recommendation were almost not sufficient for Charles Darwin to go on the HMS Beagle .
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[106]
.There was little immediate attention to this announcement of the theory; the president of the Linnean Society remarked in May 1859 that the year had not been marked by any revolutionary discoveries.^ This revolutionary theory was published in 1859 in Darwins now famous treatise, On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[107] Only one review rankled enough for Darwin to recall it later; Professor Samuel Haughton of Dublin claimed that "all that was new in them was false, and what was true was old."[108] Darwin struggled for thirteen months to produce an abstract of his "big book", suffering from ill health but getting constant encouragement from his scientific friends. Lyell arranged to have it published by John Murray.[109]
.On the Origin of Species proved unexpectedly popular, with the entire stock of 1,250 copies oversubscribed when it went on sale to booksellers on 22 November 1859.[110] In the book, Darwin set out "one long argument" of detailed observations, inferences and consideration of anticipated objections.^ Darwin 's book The Origin of Species finally appeared in mid November 1859.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ This important theory was popularized by Darwins publication On the Origin of Species (1859).
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Darwins complete theory was published in 1859, in On the Origin of Species.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[111] His only allusion to human evolution was the understatement that "light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history".[112] His theory is simply stated in the introduction:
.As many more individuals of each species are born than can possibly survive; and as, consequently, there is a frequently recurring struggle for existence, it follows that any being, if it vary however slightly in any manner profitable to itself, under the complex and sometimes varying conditions of life, will have a better chance of surviving, and thus be naturally selected.^ Variation after 1859: Natural Selection .
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In effect, nature selects the individuals with the best combinations of traits for survival.
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^ He who believes in the struggle for existence and in the principle of natural selection, will acknowledge that every organic being is constantly endeavouring to increase in numbers; and that if any one being varies ever so little, either in habits or structure, and thus gains an advantage over some other inhabitant of the same country, it will seize on the place of that inhabitant, however different that may be from its own place [ STRESS added] .
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.From the strong principle of inheritance, any selected variety will tend to propagate its new and modified form.^ From the strong principle of inheritance, any selected variety will tend to propagate its new and modified form.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]
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^ This brings me to my New Theory, which in truth is a slight variation of Charles Darwin s Old Theory, the world-famous principle of natural selection.
  • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The solution, as I believe, is that the modified offspring of all dominant and increasing forms tend to become adapted to many and highly diversified places in the economy of nature.
  • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

[113]
He put a strong case for common descent, but avoided the then controversial term "evolution", and at the end of the book concluded that:
.There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.^ "There is a grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed laws [ sic .
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Gould in his quote, which continues as follows] Whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.'"
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^ There is a [simple] grandeur in this view of life with its several powers of growth, reproduction and of sensation, having been originally breathed into matter under a few forms, perhaps into only one, and that whilst this planet has gone cycling onwards according to the fixed laws of gravity and whilst land and water have gone on replacing each other--from so simple an origin, through the selection of infinitesimal varieties, endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been evolved [ STRESS added].
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[114]

Responses to the publication

Three quarter length portrait of sixty year old man, balding, with white hair and long white bushy beard, with heavy eyebrows shading his eyes looking thoughtfully into the distance, wearing a wide lapelled jacket.
During the Darwin family's 1868 holiday in her Isle of Wight cottage, Julia Margaret Cameron took portraits showing the bushy beard Darwin had grown by 1866.
White bearded head of Darwin with the body of a crouching ape.
.
An 1871 caricature following publication of The Descent of Man was typical of many showing Darwin with an ape body, identifying him in popular culture as the leading author of evolutionary theory.
^ A 1984 author had a nice summary statement of Darwin's 1871 publication: .
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ By the Descent of Man (1871) Darwin could write: .
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ When Descent of Man was published in 1871, the "controversy" was almost over in Darwin's time!
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[115]
The book aroused international interest, with less controversy than had greeted the popular Vestiges of Creation.[116] .Though Darwin's illness kept him away from the public debates, he eagerly scrutinised the scientific response, commenting on press cuttings, reviews, articles, satires and caricatures, and corresponded on it with colleagues worldwide.^ Gray was one of the few persons whom Darwin kept fully informed concerning the publication of his Origin of Species (1859).
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Darwin was essentially confined to his home at Down as a result of his illness from his South American research and he really did not take part in the great public and scientific debates that came about with the publication of Origin.
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^ She was one of a very rare kind, and, frankly, it was no wonder if the elderly Charles Darwin (deeply committed though Darwin was to his Emma) got a bit carried away when he met her!
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[117] .Darwin had only said "Light will be thrown on the origin of man",[118] but the first review claimed it made a creed of the "men from monkeys" idea from Vestiges.^ Much light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history."
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^ Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history.
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[119] Amongst early favourable responses, Huxley's reviews swiped at Richard Owen, leader of the scientific establishment Huxley was trying to overthrow.[120] .In April, Owen's review attacked Darwin's friends and condescendingly dismissed his ideas, angering Darwin,[121] but Owen and others began to promote ideas of supernaturally guided evolution.^ On the other hand, there are those who state that Darwin was but a product of the times and that "evolutionary ideas" were in the air.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ "The idea that evolution by natural selection could account for the origin of man was taken up by others as a direct result of Darwin's ideas.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He applied term 'evolution' (applied to embryonic development) to the process of transformation from 1834 time his works began to be more mystical and vague - dominated by idea of unitary universe.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[122]
The Church of England's response was mixed. .Darwin's old Cambridge tutors Sedgwick and Henslow dismissed the ideas, but liberal clergymen interpreted natural selection as an instrument of God's design, with the cleric Charles Kingsley seeing it as "just as noble a conception of Deity".[123] In 1860, the publication of Essays and Reviews by seven liberal Anglican theologians diverted clerical attention from Darwin, with its ideas including higher criticism attacked by church authorities as heresy.^ Atheistic - often actively ridiculing the idea of God and design in nature .
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Charles Darwin had concern about his theory of natural selection.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Charles Darwin Influenced by Adam Sedgwick : Charles Darwin was greatly influenced by the geologist Adam Sedgwick and naturalist John Henslow in his development of the theory of natural selection, which was to become the foundation concept supporting the theory of evolution.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In it, Baden Powell argued that miracles broke God's laws, so belief in them was atheistic, and praised "Mr Darwin's masterly volume [supporting] the grand principle of the self-evolving powers of nature".[124] Asa Gray discussed teleology with Darwin, who imported and distributed Gray's pamphlet on theistic evolution, Natural Selection is not inconsistent with Natural Theology.^ Gray, Asa (1861) Natural Selection Trubner .
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Humans have a natural belief in God.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Weismann reemphasized the role of natural selection by arguing that a persons characteristics are determined genetically at conception.
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[123][125] .The most famous confrontation was at the public 1860 Oxford evolution debate during a meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, where the Bishop of Oxford Samuel Wilberforce, though not opposed to transmutation of species, argued against Darwin's explanation and human descent from apes.^ Since Darwin's study little work on the evolution of the special mechanisms of plants and their animal pollen vectors had been accomplished.
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^ Like other biologists of the time, Galton's interest in human heredity was piqued by the theories of species evolution outlined in Charles Darwin 's classic treatise On the Origin of Species (1859).
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^ The next year, Darwin published On the Origin of Species , the book that made the theory of natural selection famous.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Joseph Hooker argued strongly for Darwin, and Thomas Huxley's legendary retort, that he would rather be descended from an ape than a man who misused his gifts, came to symbolise a triumph of science over religion.^ Darwin would, of it would have seemed to him absurd to suppose that this would involve renouncing evolution itself rather than just some of his materialistic assumptions.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Thomas Henry Huxley a rising force in science and virulently anti-clerical embraced the theory.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He was Charles Darwin's grandfather, though died before Charles was born His system of evolution was romantic rather than empirical, it was fanciful and hypothetical, and was not generally regarded as at the forefront cutting edge of science in the early 19th century.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[123][126]
.Even Darwin's close friends Gray, Hooker, Huxley and Lyell still expressed various reservations but gave strong support, as did many others, particularly younger naturalists.^ Joseph Hooker was another close friend Darwin relied on.

^ In the ensuing debate Joseph Hooker argued strongly for Darwin and Thomas Huxley established himself as "Darwin's bulldog" – the fiercest defender of evolutionary theory on the Victorian stage.
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^ They did not, but easily could have, said ‘God does not play dice with the universe.’ But as Darwin stated repeatedly, if gently, to Gray—if God ordained that variations should be along beneficial lines, natural selection would be redundant.
  • Darwinism (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Gray and Lyell sought reconciliation with faith, while Huxley portrayed a polarisation between religion and science.^ Philosopher Daniel Dennett argues that America is drowning in religion -- and that faith needs to be analyzed with the tools of science.
  • Charles Darwin - Salon.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Wikipedia History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science (English) (as Author) Draper, Lyman Copeland, 1815-1891 .
  • Browse By Author: D - Project Gutenberg 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In Reason, Science and Faith we show in detail a number of other key points on Lyell: .
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

He campaigned pugnaciously against the authority of the clergy in education,[123] aiming to overturn the dominance of clergymen and aristocratic amateurs under Owen in favour of a new generation of professional scientists. .Owen's claim that brain anatomy proved humans to be a separate biological order from apes was shown to be false by Huxley in a long running dispute parodied by Kingsley as the "Great Hippocampus Question", and discredited Owen.^ They claim that multiple mutation mistakes eventually led to humans with color vision that can focus at different lengths and two eyes that are coordinated by the brain in order to judge distances.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[127]
.Darwinism became a movement covering a wide range of evolutionary ideas.^ This movement became known as reform Darwinism.
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^ On the other hand, there are those who state that Darwin was but a product of the times and that "evolutionary ideas" were in the air.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Darwin's theory also resonated with various movements at the time [III] and became a key fixture of popular culture.
  • Charles Darwin - Paleontology Wiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC paleontology.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In 1863 Lyell's Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man popularised prehistory, though his caution on evolution disappointed Darwin.^ Lyell was fairly theologically orthodox (though not naturally devout), and his Principles took an anti-evolution line because of his views on the specialness humankind.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In any event, relationship with Grant cooled, and the evidence seems to be that Darwin did not embrace the older man's transmutationism at this time.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Darwin exaggerated his indebtedness to Lyell, but he did, on the journey, see evidences for the slow changes in land elevation over long periods of time.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

.Weeks later Huxley's Evidence as to Man's Place in Nature showed that anatomically, humans are apes, then The Naturalist on the River Amazons by Henry Walter Bates provided empirical evidence of natural selection.^ The theory of natural selection both predicts that such differences will exist and provides a scientific understanding of why they do.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In 1849 he set off for the Amazon River with the British naturalist Henry Walter Bates, convinced that he could make a living collecting exotic specimens of wildlife for museums and universities.
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^ Published The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex, which explicitly stated that humans are descended from apes.
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[128] .Lobbying brought Darwin Britain's highest scientific honour, the Royal Society's Copley Medal, awarded on 3 November 1864.[129] That day, Huxley held the first meeting of what became the influential X Club devoted to "science, pure and free, untrammelled by religious dogmas".[130] By the end of the decade most scientists agreed that evolution occurred, but only a minority supported Darwin's view that the chief mechanism was natural selection.^ Darwin was elected to the Royal Society (1839).
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^ Since Darwin's study little work on the evolution of the special mechanisms of plants and their animal pollen vectors had been accomplished.
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Century Darwinism: Although social Darwinism was highly influential at the beginning of the 20th century, it rapidly lost popularity and support after World War I (1914-1918).
  • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[131]
.The Origin of Species was translated into many languages, becoming a staple scientific text attracting thoughtful attention from all walks of life, including the "working men" who flocked to Huxley's lectures.^ Darwin himself was well aware that his "followers" included men like Gray who combined it with varying kinds of Christian belief including the conservative and evangelical.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ If it were, "the plain language" of the New Testament "seems to show that the men who do not believe, and this would include my father, brother and almost all my best friends, will be everlastingly punished.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I can, indeed, hardly see how anyone ought to wish Christianity to be true; for if so the plain language of the text seems to show that men who do not believe, and this would include my Father, Brother and almost all my best friends, will be everlastingly punished.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[132] .Darwin's theory also resonated with various movements at the time[III] and became a key fixture of popular culture.^ This movement became known as reform Darwinism.
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^ Spencers social Darwinism became very popular in the last half of the 19th century when industrialization was changing American and Western European societies.
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^ Ethics : The scientific development that most affected ethics after the time of Newton was the theory of evolution advanced by Charles Darwin.
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[IV] .Cartoonists parodied animal ancestry in an old tradition of showing humans with animal traits, and in Britain these droll images served to popularise Darwin's theory in an unthreatening way.^ These animals show that evolution is not possible.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Darwin did not address human evolution in his most famous study : On the Origin of Species (1859) which focused on the evolution of plants and animals.
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^ The logicaland intensely controversial-extension of Darwins theory was that humans, too, evolved through the ages.
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.While ill in 1862 Darwin began growing a beard, and when he reappeared in public in 1866 caricatures of him as an ape helped to identify all forms of evolutionism with Darwinism.^ Erasmus Darwin (30) Hence, a traveller should be a botanist, for in all views plants form the chief embellishment.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The DNA of all life forms, including plants and trees, absolutely destroys Darwin's Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[115]

Descent of Man, sexual selection, and botany

Head and shoulders portrait, increasingly bald with rather uneven bushy white eyebrows and beard, his wrinkled forehead suggesting a puzzled frown
By 1879, an increasingly famous Darwin had suffered years of illness.
More detailed articles cover Darwin's life from Orchids to Variation, from Descent of Man to Emotions and from Insectivorous Plants to Worms
.Despite repeated bouts of illness during the last twenty-two years of his life, Darwin's work continued.^ Despite repeated bouts of illness during the last twenty-two years of his life, Darwin pressed on with his work.
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^ In June 1858 Alfred Russel Wallace sent Darwin a letter presenting a summary of the very views Darwin had formed twenty years earlier.
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^ In Australia , the marsupial rat-kangaroo and the platypus seemed so unusual that Darwin thought it was almost as though two distinct Creators had been at work.
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.Having published On the Origin of Species as an abstract of his theory, he pressed on with experiments, research, and writing of his "big book". He covered human descent from earlier animals including evolution of society and of mental abilities, as well as explaining decorative beauty in wildlife and diversifying into innovative plant studies.^ Darwin did not address human evolution in his most famous study : On the Origin of Species (1859) which focused on the evolution of plants and animals.
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^ Darwins complete theory was published in 1859, in On the Origin of Species.
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^ Published On the Origin of Species, his complete theory of natural selection.
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Enquiries about insect pollination led in 1861 to novel studies of wild orchids, showing adaptation of their flowers to attract specific moths to each species and ensure cross fertilisation. .In 1862 Fertilisation of Orchids gave his first detailed demonstration of the power of natural selection to explain complex ecological relationships, making testable predictions.^ The theory of natural selection both predicts that such differences will exist and provides a scientific understanding of why they do.
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^ They have black skin, just the opposite of what the theory of natural selection would predict.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Biologists explain the diversity of modern organisms by the control of the environment exerts on their survival and breeding success (natural selection).
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As his health declined, he lay on his sickbed in a room filled with inventive experiments to trace the movements of climbing plants.[133] Admiring visitors included Ernst Haeckel, a zealous proponent of Darwinismus incorporating Lamarckism and Goethe's idealism.[134] Wallace remained supportive, though he increasingly turned to Spiritualism.[135]
.The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication of 1868 was the first part of Darwin's planned "big book", and included his unsuccessful hypothesis of pangenesis attempting to explain heredity.^ Since Darwin's study little work on the evolution of the special mechanisms of plants and their animal pollen vectors had been accomplished.
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^ Darwin did not address human evolution in his most famous study : On the Origin of Species (1859) which focused on the evolution of plants and animals.
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^ His later booksincluding The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication (1868), The Descent of Man (1871), and The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (1872)were detailed expositions of topics that had been confined to small sections of the Origin.
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It sold briskly at first, despite its size, and was translated into many languages. .He wrote most of a second part, on natural selection, but it remained unpublished in his lifetime.^ According to natural selection, the members of the bird species with the smallest useless wing would be the most adaptable and most likely to survive in the largest numbers.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The theory of natural selection should conclude that humans should be able to easily correct false thinking, because it is the most beneficial approach, but they can't.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Theory of Evolution is based on natural selection of the most adaptable member of a species, not the weakest.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[136]
Darwin's figure is shown seated, dressed in a toga, in a circular frame labelled "TIME'S METER" around which a succession of figures spiral, starting with an earthworm emerging from the broken letters "CHAOS" then worms with head and limbs, followed by monkeys, apes, primitive men, a loin cloth clad hunter with a club, and a gentleman who tips his top hat to Darwin.
Punch's almanac for 1882, published shortly before Darwin's death, depicts him amidst evolution from chaos to Victorian gentleman with the title Man Is But A Worm.
Lyell had already popularised human prehistory, and Huxley had shown that anatomically humans are apes.[128] .With The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex published in 1871, Darwin set out evidence from numerous sources that humans are animals, showing continuity of physical and mental attributes, and presented sexual selection to explain impractical animal features such as the peacock's plumage as well as human evolution of culture, differences between sexes, and physical and cultural racial characteristics, while emphasising that humans are all one species.^ By the Descent of Man (1871) Darwin could write: .
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^ Seek out other students to present evidence against evolution.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ These animals show that evolution is not possible.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[137] .His research using images was expanded in his 1872 book The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, one of the first books to feature printed photographs, which discussed the evolution of human psychology and its continuity with the behaviour of animals.^ In The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals (1872), Darwin observed that dogs growl and draw back their ears and lips as a sign of savageness.
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^ Darwin did not address human evolution in his most famous study : On the Origin of Species (1859) which focused on the evolution of plants and animals.
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^ His later booksincluding The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication (1868), The Descent of Man (1871), and The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (1872)were detailed expositions of topics that had been confined to small sections of the Origin.
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.Both books proved very popular, and Darwin was impressed by the general assent with which his views had been received, remarking that "everybody is talking about it without being shocked."^ In June 1858 Alfred Russel Wallace sent Darwin a letter presenting a summary of the very views Darwin had formed twenty years earlier.
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^ Trial (6) Darwin's book is very important and serves me as a basis in natural science for the class struggle in history.
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^ That's why we need to stop talking about what Charles Darwin did, or did not, believe.
  • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

[138] .His conclusion was "that man with all his noble qualities, with sympathy which feels for the most debased, with benevolence which extends not only to other men but to the humblest living creature, with his god-like intellect which has penetrated into the movements and constitution of the solar system–with all these exalted powers–Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin."^ Some looked like living creatures, others didn't, and opinions on their origins varied.
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^ There is no question that Mr Darwin died as he had lived an agnostic but he was a most honourable, chivalrous, and benevolent gentleman.
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^ In the eighteenth century, the most important figure in biology was probably Carl Linne or Linnaeus, the man who adapted Ray's system of organic classification into the one which is still used today.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

[139]
.His evolution-related experiments and investigations led to books on Insectivorous Plants, The Power of Movement in Plants, The Effects of Cross and Self Fertilisation in the Vegetable Kingdom, different forms of flowers on plants of the same species, and The Power of Movement in Plants.^ Since Darwin's study little work on the evolution of the special mechanisms of plants and their animal pollen vectors had been accomplished.
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^ Continuing the breeding experiments, he found that the self-pollinated AA bred true to produce pure tall plants, that the aa plant produced pure dwarf plants, and the Aa, or hybrid, tall plants produced the same three-to-one ratio of offspring.
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^ Some animals have DNA sequences that are identical to sequences in plant DNA, but they obviously could not be related according to the Theory of Evolution.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

.In his last book he returned to The Formation of Vegetable Mould through the Action of Worms.^ In October Darwin 's last book ( Worms ) appeared, and Darwin was still traveling around.
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He died at Down House on 19 April 1882. He had expected to be buried in St Mary's churchyard at Downe, but at the request of Darwin's colleagues, William Spottiswoode (President of the Royal Society) arranged for Darwin to be given a state funeral and buried in Westminster Abbey, close to John Herschel and Isaac Newton.[140] .Only five non-royal personages were granted that honour of a UK state funeral during the 19th century.^ British and United States warships and whaling vessels landed frequently at the Galpagos in the 19th century.
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^ The Age of the Earth Debate : The first estimate fell during the 19th century.
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^ The last three decades of the 19th century comprised a period of growth, development, and expansion for the United States.
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[13]
.Darwin was perceived as a national hero who had changed thinking, and scientists now accepted evolution as descent with modification, but few agreed with him that "natural selection has been the main but not the exclusive means of modification".[141] In "the eclipse of Darwinism" most favoured alternative evolutionary mechanisms, but these proved untenable, and the development of the modern evolutionary synthesis with population genetics and Mendelian genetics from the 1930s to the 1950s brought a broad scientific consensus that natural selection was the basic mechanism of evolution.^ Darwin was, after all, a respected national scientific hero.
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Modern scientific discoveries are proving evolution to be impossible.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In other words, these scientists are discrediting their own evolutionary theory of "natural selection."
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

Research and debate has continued within this frame of reference.[4]

Darwin's children

Darwin in his thirties, with his son dressed in a frock sitting on his knee.
Darwin and his eldest son William Erasmus Darwin in 1842.
Darwin's Children
William Erasmus Darwin (27 December 1839–1914)
Anne Elizabeth Darwin (2 March 1841–23 April 1851)
Mary Eleanor Darwin (23 September 1842–16 October 1842)
Henrietta Emma "Etty" Darwin (25 September 1843–1929)
George Howard Darwin (9 July 1845–7 December 1912)
Elizabeth "Bessy" Darwin (8 July 1847–1926)
Francis Darwin (16 August 1848–19 September 1925)
Leonard Darwin (15 January 1850–26 March 1943)
Horace Darwin (13 May 1851–29 September 1928)
Charles Waring Darwin (6 December 1856–28 June 1858)
Three quarter length studio photo of seated girl about nine years old, looking slightly plump and rather solemn, in a striped dress, holding a basket of flowers on her lap.
.
In 1851 Darwin was devastated when his daughter Annie died.
^ The death in 1851 of his favorite daughter Annie (aged ten) destroyed any vestige of belief in a benevolent creator: .
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.By then his faith in Christianity had dwindled, and he had stopped going to church.^ His belief dwindled, and with the death of his daughter Annie in 1851 Darwin finally lost all faith in Christianity.
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^ Template:Harvnb His belief dwindled, and with the death of his daughter Annie in 1851, Darwin finally lost all faith in Christianity.
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[142]
The Darwins had ten children: two died in infancy, and Annie's death at the age of ten had a devastating effect on her parents. .Charles was a devoted father and uncommonly attentive to his children.^ Charles was a devoted father and uncommonly attentive to his children.
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[7] Whenever they fell ill he feared that they might have inherited weaknesses from inbreeding due to the close family ties he shared with his wife and cousin, Emma Wedgwood. .He examined this topic in his writings, contrasting it with the advantages of crossing amongst many organisms.^ He examined this topic in his writings, contrasting it with the advantages of crossing amongst many organisms.
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[143] .Despite his fears, most of the surviving children went on to have distinguished careers as notable members of the prominent Darwin-Wedgwood family.^ According to natural selection, the members of the bird species with the smallest useless wing would be the most adaptable and most likely to survive in the largest numbers.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[144]
Of his surviving children, George, Francis and Horace became Fellows of the Royal Society,[145] distinguished as astronomer,[146] botanist and civil engineer, respectively. His son Leonard, on the other hand, went on to be a soldier, politician, economist, eugenicist and mentor of the statistician and evolutionary biologist Ronald Fisher.[147]

Religious views

Darwin's family tradition was nonconformist Unitarianism, while his father and grandfather were freethinkers, and his baptism and boarding school were Church of England.[16] When going to Cambridge to become an Anglican clergyman, he did not doubt the literal truth of the Bible.[21] .He learnt John Herschel's science which, like William Paley's natural theology, sought explanations in laws of nature rather than miracles and saw adaptation of species as evidence of design.^ According to natural selection, the members of the bird species with the smallest useless wing would be the most adaptable and most likely to survive in the largest numbers.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ No evidence exists that the fish is anything more than just another species.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The classic example is William Paley's famous watch, whose parts are clearly put together and directed to an end outside their individual natures by an intelligent agent.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[23][24] On board the Beagle, Darwin was quite orthodox and would quote the Bible as an authority on morality.[148] He looked for "centres of creation" to explain distribution,[45] and related the antlion found near kangaroos to distinct "periods of Creation".[47]
By his return he was critical of the Bible as history, and wondered why all religions should not be equally valid.[148] .In the next few years, while intensively speculating on geology and transmutation of species, he gave much thought to religion and openly discussed this with Emma, whose beliefs also came from intensive study and questioning.^ The fossilized red horn coral high in the Uinta Mountains of Utah prove the Earth is much older than a few thousands of years.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[81] The theodicy of Paley and Thomas Malthus vindicated evils such as starvation as a result of a benevolent creator's laws which had an overall good effect. .To Darwin, natural selection produced the good of adaptation but removed the need for design,[149] and he could not see the work of an omnipotent deity in all the pain and suffering such as the ichneumon wasp paralysing caterpillars as live food for its eggs.^ The body and soul of Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution was his idea that evolution was made possible through natural selection.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Swarms of life would evolve all over the universe if life could evolve on Earth under such extreme conditions.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ This action is the opposite of survival of the fittest as described in Darwin's Theory of Natural Selection.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[125] He still viewed organisms as perfectly adapted, and On the Origin of Species reflects theological views. .Though he thought of religion as a tribal survival strategy, Darwin still believed that God was the ultimate lawgiver.^ Evolution is a Religion - the Worship of a Make-Believe Time-god.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[150][151]
Darwin remained close friends with the vicar of Downe, John Innes, and continued to play a leading part in the parish work of the church,[152] but from around 1849 would go for a walk on Sundays while his family attended church.[142] He considered it "absurd to doubt that a man might be an ardent theist and an evolutionist"[153][154] and, though reticent about his religious views, in 1879 he wrote that "I have never been an atheist in the sense of denying the existence of a God. – I think that generally ... an agnostic would be the most correct description of my state of mind."[81][153]
The "Lady Hope Story", published in 1915, claimed that Darwin had reverted back to Christianity on his sickbed. The claims were repudiated by Darwin's children and have been dismissed as false by historians.[155] His last words were to his family, telling Emma "I am not the least afraid of death – Remember what a good wife you have been to me – Tell all my children to remember how good they have been to me", then while she rested, he repeatedly told Henrietta and Francis "It's almost worth while to be sick to be nursed by you".[156]

Political interpretations

Darwin's fame and popularity led to his name being associated with ideas and movements which at times had only an indirect relation to his writings, and sometimes went directly against his express comments.
Full length portrait of a very thin white bearded Darwin, seated but leaning eagerly forward and smiling.
Caricature from 1871 Vanity Fair

Eugenics

Darwin was interested by his half-cousin Francis Galton's argument, introduced in 1865, that statistical analysis of heredity showed that moral and mental human traits could be inherited, and principles of animal breeding could apply to humans. .In The Descent of Man Darwin noted that aiding the weak to survive and have families could lose the benefits of natural selection, but cautioned that withholding such aid would endanger the instinct of sympathy, "the noblest part of our nature", and factors such as education could be more important.^ Descent of Man, sexual selection and botany .
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^ By the Descent of Man (1871) Darwin could write: .
  • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It's the book where Darwin introduced the theory of natural selection and survival of the fittest...
  • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

.When Galton suggested that publishing research could encourage intermarriage within a "caste" of "those who are naturally gifted", Darwin foresaw practical difficulties, and thought it "the sole feasible, yet I fear utopian, plan of procedure in improving the human race", preferring to simply publicise the importance of inheritance and leave decisions to individuals.^ Evolutionists simply ignore the fact that intelligent humans suddenly appeared in the very recent past, certainly within the last 8,000 years.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

[157]
Galton named the field of study Eugenics in 1883, after Darwin's death, and developed biometrics. Eugenics movements were widespread at a time when Darwin's natural selection was eclipsed by Mendelian genetics, and in some countries including the United States, compulsory sterilisation laws were imposed. Following the use of Eugenics in Nazi Germany it has been largely abandoned throughout the world.[V]

Social Darwinism

Taking descriptive ideas as moral and social justification creates the ethical is-ought problem. When Thomas Malthus argued that population growth beyond resources was ordained by God to get humans to work productively and show restraint in getting families, this was used in the 1830s to justify workhouses and laissez-faire economics.[158] Evolution was seen as having social implications, and Herbert Spencer's 1851 book Social Statics based ideas of human freedom and individual liberties on his Lamarckian evolutionary theory.[159]
.Darwin's theory of evolution was a matter of explanation.^ THEORIES TOO: POLL. Charles Darwin's theory of evolution?
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^ Charles Darwin s theories of evolution.
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^ Ariew used works and research from Charles Darwin 's influences and contemporaries to offer insight into how Darwin developed his theory of evolution.
  • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

He thought it "absurd to talk of one animal being higher than another" and saw evolution as having no goal, but soon after the Origin was published in 1859, critics derided his description of a struggle for existence as a Malthusian justification for the English industrial capitalism of the time. The term Darwinism was used for the evolutionary ideas of others, including Spencer's "survival of the fittest" as free-market progress, and Ernst Haeckel's racist ideas of human development. Darwin did not share the racism common at that time: a point examined by the philosopher Antony Flew, who is at pains to distance Darwin's attitudes from those later attributed to him.[160] Darwin was strongly against slavery, against "ranking the so-called races of man as distinct species", and against ill-treatment of native people.[161][VI]
Darwin's views on social and political issues reflected his time and social position. He thought men's eminence over women was the outcome of sexual selection, a view disputed by Antoinette Brown Blackwell in The Sexes Throughout Nature.[162] He valued European civilisation and saw colonisation as spreading its benefits, with the sad but inevitable effect of extermination of savage peoples who did not become civilised. Darwin's theories presented this as natural, and were cited to promote policies which went against his humanitarian principles.[163] Writers used natural selection to argue for various, often contradictory, ideologies such as laissez-faire dog-eat dog capitalism, racism, warfare, colonialism and imperialism. However, Darwin's holistic view of nature included "dependence of one being on another", thus pacifists, socialists, liberal social reformers and anarchists such as Prince Peter Kropotkin stressed the value of co-operation over struggle within a species.[164] .Darwin himself insisted that social policy should not simply be guided by concepts of struggle and selection in nature.^ Template:Harvnb Darwin himself insisted that social policy should not simply be guided by concepts of struggle and selection in nature, Template:Harvnb and that sympathy should be extended to all races and nations.
  • Charles Darwin - Hwiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC hwiki.fzk.de [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Asa Gray persuaded a publisher in the United States to pay royalties, and Darwin imported and distributed Gray's pamphlet Natural Selection is not inconsistent with Natural Theology .
  • Charles Darwin - Hwiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC hwiki.fzk.de [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ They did not, but easily could have, said ‘God does not play dice with the universe.’ But as Darwin stated repeatedly, if gently, to Gray—if God ordained that variations should be along beneficial lines, natural selection would be redundant.
  • Darwinism (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[165]
The term "Social Darwinism" was used infrequently from around the 1890s, but became popular as a derogatory term in the 1940s when used by Richard Hofstadter to attack the laissez-faire conservatism of those like William Graham Sumner who opposed reform and socialism. .Since then it has been used as a term of abuse by those opposed to what they think are the moral consequences of evolution.^ Some even used the word and term: Transformationalism as I had it in one my many commentaries on evolution.
  • Charles Darwin wasn't an enemy of Christianity - Telegraph 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.telegraph.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

^ Sooner or later, those urges hurt others when they are unchecked by morals from the bible.
  • Charles Darwin wasn't an enemy of Christianity - Telegraph 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.telegraph.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

^ Shipman, Pat, 1994, The Evolution Of Racism: Human Differences And The Use And Abuse Of Science (NY: SImon and Schuster).
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[166][158]

Commemoration

Three-quarter portrait of a senior Darwin dressed in black before a black background. His face and six-inch white beard are dramatically lit from the side. His eyes are shaded by his brows and look directly and thoughtfully at the viewer.
In 1881 Darwin was an eminent figure, still working on his contributions to evolutionary thought that had had an enormous effect on many fields of science.
During Darwin's lifetime, many geographical features were given his name. An expanse of water adjoining the Beagle Channel was named Darwin Sound by Robert FitzRoy after Darwin's prompt action, along with two or three of the men, saved them from being marooned on a nearby shore when a collapsing glacier caused a large wave that would have swept away their boats,[167] and the nearby Mount Darwin in the Andes was named in celebration of Darwin's 25th birthday.[168] When the Beagle was surveying Australia in 1839, Darwin's friend John Lort Stokes sighted a natural harbour which the ship's captain Wickham named Port Darwin: a nearby settlement was renamed Darwin in 1911, and it became the capital city of Australia's Northern Territory.[169]
.More than 120 species and nine genera have been named after Darwin.^ Charles Darwin: More than the origin .

^ Charles Darwin: More than the origin Login Home .

[170] In one example, the group of tanagers related to those Darwin found in the Galápagos Islands became popularly known as "Darwin's finches" in 1947, fostering inaccurate legends about their significance to his work.[171]
Darwin's work has continued to be celebrated by numerous publications and events. The Linnean Society of London has commemorated Darwin's achievements by the award of the Darwin–Wallace Medal since 1908. Darwin Day has become an annual celebration, and in 2009 worldwide events were arranged for the bicentenary of Darwin's birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the Origin of Species.[172]

Works

.Darwin was a prolific writer.^ Letters, Frederick Burkhardt, editor Charles Darwin was a prolific letter writer ?
  • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

Even without publication of his works on evolution, he would have had a considerable reputation as the author of The Voyage of the Beagle, as a geologist who had published extensively on South America and had solved the puzzle of the formation of coral atolls, and as a biologist who had published the definitive work on barnacles. While The Origin of Species dominates perceptions of his work, The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex and The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals had considerable impact, and his books on plants including The Power of Movement in Plants were innovative studies of great importance, as was his final work on The Formation of Vegetable Mould Through the Action of Worms.[173]
This botanist is denoted by the author abbreviation Darwin when citing a botanical name.[174]

See also

Notes

I. ^ Darwin was eminent as a naturalist, geologist, biologist, and author; after working as a physician's assistant and two years as a medical student was educated as a clergyman; and was trained in taxidermy.[175]
II. ^ Robert FitzRoy was to become known after the voyage for biblical literalism, but at this time he had considerable interest in Lyell's ideas, and they met before the voyage when Lyell asked for observations to be made in South America. FitzRoy's diary during the ascent of the River Santa Cruz in Patagonia recorded his opinion that the plains were raised beaches, but on return, newly married to a very religious lady, he recanted these ideas. (Browne 1995, pp. 186, 414)
III. ^ See, for example, WILLA volume 4, Charlotte Perkins Gilman and the Feminization of Education by Deborah M. De Simone: "Gilman shared many basic educational ideas with the generation of thinkers who matured during the period of "intellectual chaos" caused by Darwin's Origin of the Species. Marked by the belief that individuals can direct human and social evolution, many progressives came to view education as the panacea for advancing social progress and for solving such problems as urbanisation, poverty, or immigration."
IV. ^ See, for example, the song "A lady fair of lineage high" from Gilbert and Sullivan's Princess Ida, which describes the descent of man (but not woman!) from apes.
V. ^ Geneticists studied human heredity as Mendelian inheritance, while eugenics movements sought to manage society, with a focus on social class in the United Kingdom, and on disability and ethnicity in the United States, leading to geneticists seeing this as impractical pseudoscience. .A shift from voluntary arrangements to "negative" eugenics included compulsory sterilisation laws in the United States, copied by Nazi Germany as the basis for Nazi eugenics based on virulent racism and "racial hygiene".
(Thurtle, Phillip (Updated 17 December 1996), "the creation of genetic identity", SEHR 5 (Supplement: Cultural and Technological Incubations of Fascism), http://www.stanford.edu/group/SHR/5-supp/text/thurtle.html, retrieved 2008-11-11 
Edwards, A. W. F. (April 1, 2000), "The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection", Genetics 154 (April 2000): 1419–1426, PMID 10747041, http://www.genetics.org/cgi/content/full/154/4/1419#The_Eclipse_of_Darwinism, retrieved 2008-11-11 
Wilkins, John.^ January 2010 December 2009 November 2009 October 2009 September 2009 August 2009 July 2009 June 2009 May 2009 April 2009 March 2009 February 2009 January 2009 December 2008 November 2008 October 2008 September 2008 August 2008 July 2008 June 2008 May 2008 April 2008 March 2008 February 2008 January 2008 December 2007 November 2007 October 2007 September 2007 August 2007 July 2007 June 2007 May 2007 April 2007 March 2007 February 2007 January 2007 December 2006 November 2006 October 2006 September 2006 August 2006 June 2006 May 2006 April 2006 March 2006 February 2006 January 2006 December 2005 October 2005 September 2005 June 2005 May 2005 April 2005 December 2004 November 2004 October 2004 March 2004 January 2004 October 2003 August 2003 December 2002 March 2002 November 2001 May 2001 December 2000 November 2000 October 2000 July 2000 April 2000 August 1999 May 1999 .

"Evolving Thoughts: Darwin and the Holocaust 3: eugenics". http://scienceblogs.com/evolvingthoughts/2006/09/darwin_and_the_holocaust_3_eug_1.php. Retrieved 2008-11-11.
 )
VI. ^ Darwin did not share the then common view that other races are inferior, and said of his taxidermy tutor John Edmonstone, a freed black slave, "I used often to sit with him, for he was a very pleasant and intelligent man".[17]
.Early in the Beagle voyage he nearly lost his position on the ship when he criticised FitzRoy's defence and praise of slavery.^ I was, however, quite in earnest, and got an introduction to a merchant in London to enquire about ships; but the scheme was, of course, knocked on the head by the voyage of the "Beagle".
  • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ I was, however, quite in earnest, and got an introduction to a merchant in London to enquire about ships; but the scheme was, of course, knocked on the head by the voyage of the Beagle .
  • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]

^ When FitzRoy's Narrative was published in May 1839, Darwin's Journal and Remarks ( The Voyage of the Beagle ) as the third volume was such a success that later that year it was published on its own.
  • Charles Darwin - Paleontology Wiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC paleontology.wikia.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

(Darwin 1958, p. 74) He wrote home about "how steadily the general feeling, as shown at elections, has been rising against Slavery. What a proud thing for England if she is the first European nation which utterly abolishes it! .I was told before leaving England that after living in slave countries all my opinions would be altered; the only alteration I am aware of is forming a much higher estimate of the negro character."^ But I was also ambitious to take a fair place among scientific men,−−whether more ambitious or less so than most of my fellow−workers, I can form no opinion.
  • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ To my mind the common ancestry, way back, of all living things, fixed, so to speak, the orientation of these biological substances.
  • Charles Darwin wasn't an enemy of Christianity - Telegraph 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.telegraph.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

^ I had intended to give only a chapter on the subject in the 'Descent of Man,' but as soon as I began to put my notes together, I saw that it would require a separate treatise.
  • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

(Darwin 1887, p. 246) Regarding Fuegians, he "could not have believed how wide was the difference between savage and civilized man: it is greater than between a wild and domesticated animal, inasmuch as in man there is a greater power of improvement", but he knew and liked civilised Fuegians like Jemmy Button: "It seems yet wonderful to me, when I think over all his many good qualities, that he should have been of the same race, and doubtless partaken of the same character, with the miserable, degraded savages whom we first met here."(Darwin 1845, pp. 205, 207–208)
In the Descent of Man he mentioned the Fuegians and Edmonstone when arguing against "ranking the so-called races of man as distinct species".[176]
He rejected the ill-treatment of native people, and for example wrote of massacres of Patagonian men, women, and children, "Every one here is fully convinced that this is the most just war, because it is against barbarians. .Who would believe in this age that such atrocities could be committed in a Christian civilized country?"^ A lot of people got educated by their ministers, who themselves had had higher education and had come to believe that evangelical civilization was slipping away from the churches.
  • Evolution and Wonder: Understanding Charles Darwin | Transcript of Radio Program [Speaking of Faith® from American Public Media] 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC speakingoffaith.publicradio.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It is perhaps one of the reasons that more atheists and people who believe that man descended from apes are born into Christian faith.
  • Charles Darwin wasn't an enemy of Christianity - Telegraph 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.telegraph.co.uk [Source type: Original source]

^ Swarms of life would evolve all over the universe if life could evolve on Earth under such extreme conditions.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

(Darwin 1845)

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    • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

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    • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

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  160. ^ Flew, Antony (1997). Darwinian Evolution (2 ed.). Piscataway, NJ: Transaction. ISBN 1-56000-948-9. "...there seem to be absolutely no grounds for pillorying Darwin as a racist. On the contrary... he shared...principled hatred...for Negro slavery" 
  161. ^ Wilkins 2008, pp. 408–413
  162. ^ Vandermassen, Griet (2004). "Sexual Selection: A Tale of Male Bias and Feminist Denial". European Journal of Women's Studies 11 (9): 11–13. doi:10.1177/1350506804039812. http://ejw.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/11/1/9. Retrieved 2009-11-24. 
  163. ^ Barta, Tony (2 June 2005). "Mr Darwin's shooters: on natural selection and the naturalizing of genocide". Patterns of Prejudice, Volume 39, Issue 2. Routledge. pp. 116–137. doi:10.1080/00313220500106170. http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/section?content=a713721865&fulltext=713240928. Retrieved 2009-05-20. 
  164. ^ Paul 2003, pp. 223–225
  165. ^ Bannister 1989
  166. ^ Paul 2003
    Kotzin 2004
  167. ^ FitzRoy 1839, pp. 216–8
  168. ^ Leff 2000, Darwin's Timeline
  169. ^ "Territory origins". Northern Territory Department of Planning and Infrastructure, Australia. Archived from the original on 2006-09-18. http://web.archive.org/web/20060918153343/http://www.ipe.nt.gov.au/whatwedo/landinformation/place/origins/palmdarwin.html. Retrieved 2006-12-15. 
  170. ^ "Charles Darwin 200 years - Things you didn't know about Charles Darwin". http://www.darwinfacts.com/. Retrieved 2009-05-23. 
  171. ^ Sulloway 1982, pp. 45–47
  172. ^ Shapin, Steven (7 January 2010), The Darwin Show, London Review of Books, http://www.lrb.co.uk/v32/n01/steven-shapin/the-darwin-show, retrieved 2010-01-25 
  173. ^ Balfour 1882
    van Wyhe 2008
    Anonymous 1882
  174. ^ Brummitt, R. K.; C. E. Powell (1992). Authors of Plant Names. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ISBN 1-84246-085-4. 
  175. ^ Desmond, Moore & Browne 2004
  176. ^ Darwin 1871, pp. 214, 232.

References

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Charles Darwin article)

From Wikiquote

.
Mergefrom.svg
It has been suggested that The Formation of Vegetable Mould through the Action of Worms be merged into this article or section.^ Formation by the Agency of Earth−worms of Mould.
  • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ I have now (May 1, 1881) sent to the printers the MS. of a little book on 'The Formation of Vegetable Mould, through the Action of Worms.'
  • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ I have now (May 1, 1881) sent to the printers the MS. of a little book on The Formation of Vegetable Mould, through the Action of Worms .
  • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]

.(Discuss)
Mergefrom.svg
It has been suggested that Notable Charles Darwin misquotes be merged into this article or section.^ Ariew used works and research from Charles Darwin 's influences and contemporaries to offer insight into how Darwin developed his theory of evolution.
  • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

^ Just when you thought the feeding frenzy of Charles Darwin anniversary celebrations was calming down, someone throws another tasty morsel into the water.
  • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

^ This was not to suggest that the name was neatly stitched therein, but that Charles Darwin's mother was teaching him the rudiments of the Linnaean system of classification.
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

(Discuss)
There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.
.Charles Robert Darwin (1809-02-121882-04-19) was a British naturalist who achieved lasting fame by outlining the theory of evolution and proposing that evolution could be explained through natural and sexual selection.^ Charles Darwin (12 Feb 1809 - 19 Apr 1882) English naturalist who presented facts to support his theory of the mode of evolution whereby favourable variations would survive which he called 'Natural Selection' or 'Survival of the Fittest.'
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The body and soul of Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution was his idea that evolution was made possible through natural selection.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The theory of "natural selection" is the basis and foundation for the Theory of Evolution.
  • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

.This theory is now considered an integral component of biological science.^ Consider an article which appeared in 1982 (in the now defunct) Science magazine entitled "On the Life of Mr. Darwin," written by a "Contributing Editor."
  • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Contents

Sourced

I feel most deeply that this whole question of creation is too profound for human intellect. .A dog might as well speculate on the mind of Newton!^ A dog might as well speculate on the mind of Newton.
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

.Let each man hope and believe what he can.
  • There is one living spirit, prevalent over this world ...^ Let each man hope and believe what he can.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ One was a Scotchman, brother of Sir Alexander Ramsay, and tutor of Jesus College: he was a delightful man, but did not live for many years.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No serious geologist believed the world 6000 or so years old, or that the strata were laid down in one big .
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    which assumes a multitude of forms according to subordinate laws.
    .There is one thinking sensible principle allied to one kind of organic matter.^ So this kind of chauvinism that says secularism is right, religion is all bunk -- this is one-sided and I think basically egotistic.
    • Charles Darwin - Salon.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I suspected that there was some error in the Russian belief, but I did not think of the explanation which you have almost proved to be the true one.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ There is only one plausible explanation for the existence of the galaxies, stars, planets, humans, animals, all other life, matter and energy.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Notebook C", as quoted in Creativity, Psychology And the History of Science (2005) by Howard E. Gruber and Katja Bödeker, p.^ Gruber, Howard E., 1974, Darwin On Man: A Psychological Study of Creativity .
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ In 1974, Howard Gruber published a 260+ page book entitled Darwin On Man: A Psychological Study of Creativity .
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .142
  • We can allow satellites, planets, suns, universe, nay whole systems of universe, to be governed by laws, but the smallest insect, we wish to be created at once by special act.
    • "Notebook N" (1838), as quoted in Darwin's Religious Odyssey (2002) by William E. Phipps, p.^ Origin Of Species (30) We can allow satellites, planets, suns, universe, nay whole systems of universe[s,] to be governed by laws, but the smallest insect, we wish to be created at once by special act — Charles Darwin See also: .
      • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ "When he left England on H.M.S. Beagle in 1831, Darwin believed, with most of his contemporaries, that each species has been independently created with characteristics that suit it admirably for the conditions under which it was destined to live.
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Charles Darwin University Press has published a new book called GIS Applications for Sustainable Development and Good Governance in Eastern Indonesia and Timor Leste.
      • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

      .32
  • Our faculties are more fitted to recognize the wonderful structure of a beetle than a Universe.^ Universally, men valued womens virginity more than women valued mens.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ On the other hand Darwin found it hard to escape a conviction that the universe as a whole must be more than a product of un-designed chance.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Modern biology as taught in high schools and universities is nothing more than made-up conjecture and nonsense.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • "Notebook N" (1838) as quoted in On Evolution : The Development of the Theory of Natural Selection (1996) edited by Thomas F. Glick and David Kohn, p.^ Ariew used works and research from Charles Darwin 's influences and contemporaries to offer insight into how Darwin developed his theory of evolution.
      • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

      ^ The next year, Darwin published On the Origin of Species , the book that made the theory of natural selection famous.
      • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ "When Darwin deduced the theory of natural selection to explain the adaptations in which he had previously seen the handiwork of God, he knew that he was committing cultural murder.
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      81
  • I have watched how steadily the general feeling, as shown at elections, has been rising against Slavery. What a proud thing for England if she is the first European nation which utterly abolishes it! .I was told before leaving England that after living in slave countries all my opinions would be altered; the only alteration I am aware of is forming a much higher estimate of the negro character. It is impossible to see a negro and not feel kindly towards him; such cheerful, open, honest expressions and such fine muscular bodies.^ Such a council, as representing a large body of medical men, would have more power in the eyes of vote- hunting politicians than a small body representing only themselves.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But I was also ambitious to take a fair place among scientific men,−−whether more ambitious or less so than most of my fellow−workers, I can form no opinion.
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All this shows how ambitious I was; but I think that I can say with truth that in after years, though I cared in the highest degree for the approbation of such men as Lyell and Hooker, who were my friends, I did not care much about the general public.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I never saw any of the diminutive Portuguese, with their murderous countenances, without almost wishing for Brazil to follow the example of Haiti; and, considering the enormous healthy-looking black population, it will be wonderful if, at some future day, it does not take place.^ His father was opposed to Darwin taking part in the voyage and Darwin would have followed his father's wishes not to go on the voyage had not his uncle, Jos Wedgwood, interceded for him and convinced his father to allow him to go.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ By looking at the Y chromosomes and mitochondrial DNA of various populations in various places, scientists can get a good idea of where these genetic lineages began and how they spread over the globe.
    • Charles Darwin - Salon.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I was told that I could kill the worms with salt and water, and from that day I never spitted a living worm, though at the expense probably of some loss of success.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Letter to J. S. Henslow (March 1834); later published in The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887), Ch.^ Darwin, [Sir] Francis (Editor), 1903, More Letters of Charles Darwin: A Record of His Work in A Series of Hitherto Unpublished Letters.
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ An outstanding scientist who excelled first as an observer and later as a theorist and experimenter, he was also a singularly attractive character beloved by family and colleagues alike" (John Bowlby, 1990, Charles Darwin: A New Life , page 1).
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Both, however, take the Bible literally and reject Charles Darwin's evolutionary theory that all life, including human, shares common ancestry and developed ...
      • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .6 "The Voyage —1831-1836"
  • With respect to the theological view of the question: This is always painful to me.^ While healthy as a youth, after his 1831-1836 voyage on HMS Beagle , Charles Darwin was chronically ill, having contracted what was eventually termed Chagas Disease.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Fitzroy provides the narrative of the Beagle's second voyage, between 1831 and 1836 to South America, the Galapagos Islands, Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia and elsewhere.
    • Charles Darwin - AbeBooks 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.abebooks.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Voyage of The 'Beagle': from December 27, 1831, to October 2, 1836.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]

    I am bewildered. .I had no intention to write atheistically, but I own that I cannot see as plainly as others do, and as I should wish to do, evidence of design and beneficence on all sides of us.^ It was populated with dinosaurs, apes, and all the other species we see in the ancient fossil record.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Darwin taught us all to see more clearly what everyone had seen, and Darwin also taught us to think, along with him, what no one else had thought.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ I suppose that no one can prove that death is inevitable, but the evidence in favour of this belief is overwhelmingly strong from the evidence of all other living creatures.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    There seems to me too much misery in the world. .I cannot persuade myself that a beneficent and omnipotent God would have designedly created the Ichneumonidae with the express intention of their feeding within the living bodies of caterpillars or that a cat should play with mice... On the other hand, I cannot anyhow be contented to view this wonderful universe, and especially the nature of man, and to conclude that everything is the result of brute force.^ Lyell maintained that the earths surface is undergoing constant change, the result of natural forces operating uniformly over long periods.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Emma expressed her concerns to her husband and in a letter she sent his shortly after they were married in 1839, Emma wrote that "everything that concerns you concerns me and I should be most unhappy if I thought we did not belong to each other forever."
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ And God created great whales, and every living creature that moveth, which the waters brought forth abundantly, after their kind, and every winged fowl after his kind: and God saw that [it was] good.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    .I am inclined to look at everything as resulting from designed laws, with the details, whether good or bad, left to the working out of what we may call chance.
    • Letter to Asa Gray (1860); "the Ichneumonidae" has sometimes been altered to "parasitic wasps" in paraphrases of this passage.
  • I feel most deeply that this whole question of Creation is too profound for human intellect.^ His temper was imperturbably good, with the most winning and courteous manners; yet, as I have seen, he could be roused by any bad action to the warmest indignation and prompt action.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The extract from my MS. and the letter to Asa Gray had neither been intended for publication, and were badly written.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Permit me again to thank you for the thorough manner in which you have worked out this case; to kill an error is as good a service as, and sometimes even better than, the establishing a new truth or fact.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .A dog might as well speculate on the mind of Newton!^ A dog might as well speculate on the mind of Newton.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Let each man hope and believe what he can.
    • London Illustrated News (21 April 1862)
  • It is often said that all the conditions for the first production of a living organism are now present, which could ever have been present.^ But he hoped that now he might be allowed to live.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Let each man hope and believe what he can.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Emotion (16) It is often said that all the conditions for the first production of a living organism are now present, which could have ever been present.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    But if (and oh! what a big if!) we could conceive in some warm little pond, with all sorts of ammonia and phosphoric salts, light, heat, electricity, &c., present, that a proteine compound was chemically formed ready to undergo still more complex changes, at the present day such matter would be instantly absorbed, which would not have been the case before living creatures were found. .
    • Letter to Joseph Hooker (1871)
  • My wife has just finished reading aloud your 'Life with a Black Regiment,' and you must allow me to thank you heartily for the very great pleasure which it has in many ways given us.^ I have to thank you for two very interesting letters.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Many thanks for your very kind and interesting letter...
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I thank you sincerely for your very kind letter, and for the present of your new work.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I always thought well of the negroes, from the little which I have seen of them; and I have been delighted to have my vague impressions confirmed, and their character and mental powers so ably discussed.^ I will give my impressions with respect to some of them, though I have little to say worth saying.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Psychology will be securely based on the foundation already well laid by Mr. Herbert Spencer, that of the necessary acquirement of each mental power and capacity by gradation.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ I then asked him what I had seen; but he answered me, "That is my little secret."
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .When you were here I did not know of the noble position which you had filled.^ I was at first very unwilling to consent, as I thought Mr. Wallace might consider my doing so unjustifiable, for I did not then know how generous and noble was his disposition.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Did you know that you can help us produce ebooks by proof-reading just one page a day?
    • Browse By Author: D - Project Gutenberg 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    .I had formerly read about the black regiments, but failed to connect your name with your admirable undertaking.^ Your name is always associated in one's mind with certain doubts about that history the Creation, I mean your views?"
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Although we enjoyed greatly your visit to Down, my wife and myself have over and over again regretted that we did not know about the black regiment, as we should have greatly liked to have heard a little about the South from your own lips.^ My mother died in July 1817, when I was a little over eight years old, and it is odd that I can remember hardly anything about her except her death-bed, her black velvet gown, and her curiously constructed work-table.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ After having spent two sessions in Edinburgh, my father perceived, or he heard from my sisters, that I did not like the thought of being a physician, so he proposed that I should become a clergyman.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Month by month she sent back anecdotes of the work to her little flock in Dorking, and sometimes she came down to visit them.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Letter to Thomas Higginson (27 February 1873)
  • Physiological experiment on animals is justifiable for real investigation, but not for mere damnable and detestable curiosity. .
    • Letter to E. Ray Lankester, as quoted in "Charles Robert Darwin" by E. Ray Lankester in Library of the World's Best Literature : Ancient and Modern (1902) edited by Charles Dudley Warner, p.^ Darwin, [Sir] Francis (Editor), 1903, More Letters of Charles Darwin: A Record of His Work in A Series of Hitherto Unpublished Letters.
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Colp, Ralph Jr., 1988, "Darwin, Robert Charles (1809-1882)" in Victorian Britain: An Encyclopedia , edited by Sally Mitchell, pp.
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Urbanowicz, Charles F., 1993a, Charles R. Darwin (Videotape] (February 10, in The Meriam Library at California State University, Chico).
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .4391
  • I love fools' experiments.^ Alfred Russel Wallace (7) I love fools' experiments.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I am always making them.
    • As quoted in "Charles Robert Darwin" by E. Ray Lankester in Library of the World's Best Literature : Ancient and Modern (1902) edited by Charles Dudley Warner, p.^ Colp, Ralph Jr., 1988, "Darwin, Robert Charles (1809-1882)" in Victorian Britain: An Encyclopedia , edited by Sally Mitchell, pp.
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Urbanowicz, Charles F., 1993a, Charles R. Darwin (Videotape] (February 10, in The Meriam Library at California State University, Chico).
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Modern ecology, in part, began with Charles Darwin.
      • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .4391
  • In the struggle for survival, the fittest win out at the expense of their rivals because they succeed in adapting themselves best to their environment.^ When a left-wing, liberal woman aborts her baby, it is survival of the fittest because left-wing, liberals are mentally inferior.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This is backwards from the evolutionary theory of natural selection, which states that birds adapt and change in order to survive better in their environment.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Individuals best suited to their environment are more likely to survive and breed, passing on their favorable genes to the next generation.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
    • As quoted in The Living Clocks (1971) by Ritchie R. Ward
  • Mathematics seems to endow one with something like a new sense.^ This impatience was very foolish, and in after years I have deeply regretted that I did not proceed far enough at least to understand something of the great leading principles of mathematics, for men thus endowed seem to have an extra sense.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I'm not sure if a DNA test can knit the gap something like that leaves in a person's life, but I can understand why it might seem worth trying.
    • Charles Darwin - Salon.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This impatience The Autobiography of Charles Darwin 7 The Autobiography of Charles Darwin was very foolish, and in after years I have deeply regretted that I did not proceed far enough at least to understand something of the great leading principles of mathematics, for men thus endowed seem to have an extra sense.
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    • As quoted in Men of Mathematics (1982) by Eric Temple Bell, p. .16
  • I have rarely read anything which has interested me more, though I have not read as yet more than a quarter of the book proper.^ It is the completion of a short paper read before the Geological Society more than forty years ago, and has revived old geological thoughts.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He would be interested to see any evidence, though had as yet seen nothing to convince him.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This book I thought most interesting, and read it twice, but I doubt whether his generalisations are worth anything.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    From quotations which I had seen, I had a high notion of Aristotle's merits, but I had not the most remote notion what a wonderful man he was. .Linnaeus and Cuvier have been my two gods, though in very different ways, but they were mere schoolboys to old Aristotle.^ He considers that the theory of Evolution is quite compatible with the belief in a God; but that you must remember that different persons have different definitions of what they mean by God.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I also attended on two occasions the operating theatre in the hospital at Edinburgh, and saw two very bad operations, one on a child, but I rushed away before they were completed.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Many different types of dogs can be developed this way, but they can never develop a cat by selectively breeding dogs.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Letter to William Ogle (Feb. 22, 1882). Ogle had translated Aristotle's Parts of Animals and sent Darwin a copy. .The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, ed.^ Darwin, [Sir] Francis (Editor), 1903, More Letters of Charles Darwin: A Record of His Work in A Series of Hitherto Unpublished Letters.
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Both, however, take the Bible literally and reject Charles Darwin's evolutionary theory that all life, including human, shares common ancestry and developed ...
      • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ "Charles Darwin, whose life spanned much of the nineteenth century, is the most influential biologist to have lived.
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .Francis Darwin, ii.427.
  • As for a future life, every man must judge for himself between conflicting vague probabilities.^ As for a future life, every man must judge for himself between conflicting vague probabilities.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When asking himself, in one climactic paragraph, to define the essence of the differences between life and the inanimate cosmos, Darwin chose the directional character of evolution vs. Gould then quotes the following from Darwin]: 'There is a grandeur in this view of life....
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ "In the Origin Darwin tried to avoid extending his biological explanations into social and moral questions, but the extension was unavoidable and he made it himself in The Descent of Man.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
    • In The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin.
  • Believing as I do that man in the distant future will be a far more perfect creature than he now is, it is an intolerable thought that he and all other sentient beings are doomed to complete annihilation after such long-continued slow progress.^ As usual with such relativists, however, he contradicted himself by saying that he believed that "manin the distant future will be a far more perfect creature than he now is" F Darwin (1887) I p.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ More letters of Charles Darwin (1903), Vol.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Charles Darwin: More than the origin Login Home .

    .To those who fully admit the immortality of the human soul, the destruction of our world will not appear so dreadful.^ In instances like these, you have to suspect that the field holds a special attraction for those who are made uncomfortable by the complexity of human behavior.
    • Charles Darwin - Salon.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A new study of human behavior has determined that those who wrote letters...
    • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

    • In The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin.

The Voyage of the Beagle (1839)

.
A republic cannot succeed till it contains a certain body of men imbued with the principles of justice and honour.
  • The main difficulty in using either lazo or bolas is to ride so well as to be able at full speed, and while suddenly turning about, to whirl them so steadily round the head, as to take aim: on foot any person would soon learn the art.^ Such a council, as representing a large body of medical men, would have more power in the eyes of vote- hunting politicians than a small body representing only themselves.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Her body cannot go into the eggs contained within her ovaries at her birth to make an intelligent genetic change.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ What I believe was strictly true is that innumerable well-observed facts were stored in the minds of naturalists ready to take their proper places as soon as any theory which would receive them was sufficiently explained.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]

    .One day, as I was amusing myself by galloping and whirling the balls round my head, by accident the free one struck a bush, and its revolving motion being thus destroyed, it immediately fell to the ground, and, like magic, caught one hind leg of my horse; the other ball was then jerked out of my hand, and the horse fairly secured.^ One didn't cancel the other out.
    • Charles Darwin - Salon.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In June 1842 I first allowed myself the satisfaction of writing a very brief abstract of my theory in pencil in 35 pages; and this was enlarged during the summer of 1844 into one of 230 pages, which I had fairly copied out and still possess.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In June 1842 I first allowed myself the satisfaction of writing a very brief abstract of my theory in pencil in 35 pages; and this was enlarged during the summer of 1844 into one of 230 pages , which I had fairly copied out and still possess.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]

    Luckily he was an old practised animal, and knew what it meant; otherwise he would probably have kicked till he had thrown himself down. .The Gauchos roared with laughter; they cried out that they had seen every sort of animal caught, but had never before seen a man caught by himself.^ As for a future life, every man must judge for himself between conflicting vague probabilities.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Before coming up to Cambridge, I had heard of him from my brother as a man who knew every branch of science, and I was accordingly prepared to reverence him.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Never in my life have I seen such wrath painted on a man's face as was shown by Henslow at this horrid scene.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. .III, Maldonado
  • A republic cannot succeed till it contains a certain body of men imbued with the principles of justice and honour.
    • Ch.^ Her body cannot go into the eggs contained within her ovaries at her birth to make an intelligent genetic change.
      • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

      VII, Buenos Ayres and St. Fe
.
The natural history of these islands is eminently curious, and well deserves attention.
  • They expressed, as was usual, unbounded astonishment at the globe being round, and could scarcely credit that a hole would, if deep enough, come out on the other side.^ Biography (152) The natural history of these islands is eminently curious, and well deserves attention.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In my book "A History of God," I pointed out that the most eminent Jewish, Christian and Muslim theologians all said you couldn't think about God as a simple personality, an external being.
    • Charles Darwin - Salon.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Well that often comes to me with overwhelming force, but at other times,' and he shook his head vaguely, adding 'it seems to go away.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    .They had, however, heard of a country where there were six months of light and six of darkness, and where the inhabitants were very tall and thin!^ Genes allow for people to be short, tall, fat, thin, blond, brunette, etc., but they are still all human beings.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    They were curious about the price and condition of horses and cattle in England. .Upon finding out we did not catch our animals with the lazo, they cried out, "Ah, then, you use nothing but the bolas:" the idea of an enclosed country was quite new to them. The captain at last said, he had one question to ask me, which he should be very much obliged if I would answer with all truth.^ I thought that I should have been compelled to leave the ship; but as soon as the news spread, which it did quickly, as the captain sent for the first lieutenant to assuage his anger by abusing me, I was deeply gratified by receiving an invitation from all the gun-room officers to mess with them.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Work (42) A bad earthquake at once destroys the oldest associations: the world, the very emblem of all that is solid, has moved beneath our feet like a crust over a fluid; one second of time has conveyed to the mind a strange idea of insecurity, which hours of reflection would never have created.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Science Quotes Perpetual Motion Science Stories Chemistry Stories Wall Calendar Our Survey Newsletter Science Store Notes If you find this site useful, please add a link from your site.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I trembled to think how deeply scientific it would be: it was, "Whether the ladies of Buenos Ayres were not the handsomest in the world."^ Also making important contributions were plant geographers such as Alexander von Humboldt, who were deeply interested in the how and why of vegetational distribution around the world.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    I replied, like a renegade, "Charmingly so." .He added, "I have one other question: Do ladies in any other part of the world wear such large combs?"^ Should such research be squelched out of fears that investigations into the possibly genetic superiority of one group will endorse ideologies that insist on the genetic inferiority of others?
    • Charles Darwin - Salon.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    I solemnly assured him that they did not. They were absolutely delighted. The captain exclaimed, "Look there! a man who has seen half the world says it is the case; we always thought so, but now we know it." .My excellent judgment in combs and beauty procured me a most hospitable reception; the captain forced me to take his bed, and he would sleep on his recado.^ His judgment was excellent, and his whole mind well balanced; but I do not suppose that any one would say that he possessed much original genius.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Upon the whole the three years which I spent at Cambridge were the most joyful in my happy life; for I was then in excellent health, and almost always in high spirits.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. VIII, Banda Oriental and Patagonia, November 19, 1833
.
Considering the small size of the islands, we feel the more astonished at the number of their aboriginal beings, and at their confined range.
  • The natural history of these islands is eminently curious, and well deserves attention. Most of the organic productions are aboriginal creations, found nowhere else; there is even a difference between the inhabitants of the different islands; yet all show a marked relationship with those of America, though separated from that continent by an open space of ocean, between 500 and 600 miles in width.^ I was all the more attracted to it, from not being at all satisfied with the explanation which Henslow gave us in his lectures, about twining plants, namely, that they had a natural tendency to grow up in a spire.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nor must I pass over the discovery of the singular relations of the animals and plants inhabiting the several islands of the Galapagos archipelago, and of all of them to the inhabitants of South America.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In my book "A History of God," I pointed out that the most eminent Jewish, Christian and Muslim theologians all said you couldn't think about God as a simple personality, an external being.
    • Charles Darwin - Salon.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The archipelago is a little world within itself, or rather a satellite attached to America, whence it has derived a few stray colonists, and has received the general character of its indigenous productions.^ That group might have consisted of as few as 150 hunter-gatherers, but eventually their descendants spread as far as Australia and North America to populate the world.
    • Charles Darwin - Salon.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The latter, also translated as Little World of the Past, 1962, is generally considered his best work.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Considering the small size of the islands, we feel the more astonished at the number of their aboriginal beings, and at their confined range.^ On (i), his sympathisers never numbered more than a small minority of geologists - the general view (well expressed by Sedgwick) was that it was a gratuitous assumption.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Seeing every height crowned with its crater, and the boundaries of most of the lava-streams still distinct, we are led to believe that within a period geologically recent the unbroken ocean was here spread out.^ Seeing every height crowned with its crater, and the boundaries of most of the lava-streams still distinct, we are led to believe that within a period, geologically recent, the unbroken ocean was here spread out.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This view pleased me so much that I wrote it out in extenso, and I believe that it was read by Hooker some years before E. Forbes published his celebrated memoir ('Geolog.
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .Hence, both in space and time, we seem to be brought somewhat near to that great fact — that mystery of mysteries — the first appearance of new beings on this earth.^ Hence, both in space and time, we seem to be brought somewhere near to that great factthat mystery of mysteriesthe first appearance of new beings on this earth.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For the first time, children warranted scientific attention because of societys interest in their development and well being.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ But I was then utterly astonished at Sedgwick not being delighted at so wonderful a fact as a tropical shell being found near the surface in the middle of England.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. XVII, Galapagos Archipelago
.
The different islands to a considerable extent are inhabited by a different set of beings...
  • I have not as yet noticed by far the most remarkable feature in the natural history of this archipelago; it is, that the different islands to a considerable extent are inhabited by a different set of beings.^ Most of the organic productions are aboriginal creations, found nowhere else; there is even a difference between the inhabitants of the different islands; yet all show a marked relationship with those of America, though separated from that continent by an open space of ocean, between 500 and 600 miles in width.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nor must I pass over the discovery of the singular relations of the animals and plants inhabiting the several islands of the Galapagos archipelago, and of all of them to the inhabitants of South America.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because natural resources form on a geologic time scale, the rate at which they are naturally replenished is far slower than the rate at which they are currently being depleted.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    My attention was first called to this fact by the Vice-Governor, Mr. Lawson, declaring that the tortoises differed from the different islands, and that he could with certainty tell from which island any one was brought. .I did not for some time pay sufficient attention to this statement, and I had already partially mingled together the collections from two of the islands.^ At some stage Charles had read and annotated his grandfather's Zoonomia which he admits "I greatly admired at this time" - and it is hard to believe he did not discuss it with Grant.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ To biologists and scientists studying evolution worldwide, however, Mount Data is as famous as the Galapagos Islands where Charles Darwin did some of his most ...
    • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ It is obvious from John Calvin's statement that people of time did not believe in the Young Earth Doctrine either.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    .I never dreamed that islands, about 50 or 60 miles apart, and most of them in sight of each other, formed of precisely the same rocks, placed under a quite similar climate, rising to a nearly equal height, would have been differently tenanted; but we shall soon see that this is the case.^ "When I recollect the fact, that from the form of the body, shape of scale, and general size, the Spaniards can at once pronounce from which Island any tortoise may have been brought; when I see these Islands in sight of each other and possessed of but a scanty stock of animals, tenanted by these birds but slightly differing in structure and filling the same place in Nature, I must suspect they are only varieties.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Darwin would probably do some things differently and some things the same but he would definitely incorporate information on genetics and Deoxyribonucleic research into a 1990s Origin .
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ But I was also ambitious to take a fair place among scientific men,−−whether more ambitious or less so than most of my fellow−workers, I can form no opinion.
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .It is the fate of most voyagers, no sooner to discover what is most interesting in any locality, than they are hurried from it; but I ought, perhaps, to be thankful that I obtained sufficient materials to establish this most remarkable fact in the distribution of organic beings.
    • Ch.^ Because natural resources form on a geologic time scale, the rate at which they are naturally replenished is far slower than the rate at which they are currently being depleted.
      • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ But I was also ambitious to take a fair place among scientific men,−−whether more ambitious or less so than most of my fellow−workers, I can form no opinion.
      • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ But they were perhaps even more surprised when they opened the book and discovered...
      • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

      XVII, Galapagos Archipelago
.
I thank God, I shall never again visit a slave-country.
  • I thank God, I shall never again visit a slave-country. To this day, if I hear a distant scream, it recalls with painful vividness my feelings, when passing a house near Pernambuco, I heard the most pitiable moans, and could not but suspect that some poor slave was being tortured, yet knew that I was as powerless as a child even to remonstrate.^ By "Agnostic" Huxley had signified not so much that one was simply unsure about whether there was a God, and not that one could never know.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His temper was imperturbably good, with the most winning and courteous manners; yet, as I have seen, he could be roused by any bad action to the warmest indignation and prompt action.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Many thanks about the picture, which if I survive you, and this I do not expect, shall be hung in my study as a perpetual memento of you.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I suspected that these moans were from a tortured slave, for I was told that this was the case in another instance.^ In instances like these, you have to suspect that the field holds a special attraction for those who are made uncomfortable by the complexity of human behavior.
    • Charles Darwin - Salon.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Near Rio de Janeiro I lived opposite to an old lady, who kept screws to crush the fingers of her female slaves.^ He was talking about Lady Cork, who was then extremely old.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    I have stayed in a house where a young household mulatto, daily and hourly, was reviled, beaten, and persecuted enough to break the spirit of the lowest animal. .I have seen a little boy, six or seven years old, struck thrice with a horse-whip (before I could interfere) on his naked head, for having handed me a glass of water not quite clean; I saw his father tremble at a mere glance from his master's eye.^ Darwin was a Unitarian and attended Mr. Case's chapel, and my father as a little boy went there with his elder sisters.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is the completion of a short paper read before the Geological Society more than forty years ago, and has revived old geological thoughts.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ When at work on the pegs or projections I could not imagine how they were first developed, before they could have been of mere mechanical use.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .These latter cruelties were witnessed by me in a Spanish colony, in which it has always been said, that slaves are better treated than by the Portuguese, English, or other European nations.^ The success of this, my first literary child, always tickles my vanity more than that of any of my other books.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Bagehot argued that these nations evolved principally by succeeding in conflicts with other groups.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Languages with more than 50 books: Chinese Dutch English Esperanto Finnish French German Italian Latin Portuguese Spanish Swedish Tagalog .
    • Browse By Author: D - Project Gutenberg 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    .I have seen at Rio de Janeiro a powerful negro afraid to ward off a blow directed, as he thought, at his face.^ But I have seen nothing, which more completely astonished me, than the first sight of a Savage; It was a naked Fuegian his long hair blowing about, his face besmeared with paint.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I was present when a kind-hearted man was on the point of separating forever the men, women, and little children of a large number of families who had long lived together.^ Coldstream[ 9 ] was a very different young man, prim, formal, highly religious, and most kind-hearted; he afterwards published some good zoological articles.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I had intended to give only a chapter on the subject in the 'Descent of Man,' but as soon as I began to put my notes together, I saw that it would require a separate treatise.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He was very kind to me, but was a man very difficult to live with on the intimate terms which necessarily followed from our messing by ourselves in the same cabin.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .I will not even allude to the many heart-sickening atrocities which I authentically heard of; — nor would I have mentioned the above revolting details, had I not met with several people, so blinded by the constitutional gaiety of the negro as to speak of slavery as a tolerable evil.^ I would also argue that many more than a "relatively few scientists" viewed Origin in a favorable light, not to mention the intelligent public!
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Such people have generally visited at the houses of the upper classes, where the domestic slaves are usually well treated, and they have not, like myself, lived amongst the lower classes.^ So was such a visit likely?
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Figures like A R Wallace and T H Huxley brilliant though they were struggled to make enough to live on from their science.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Even science must be purged: for the gutter atheists, material atoms are all that exist, and like the 'social atoms' - people - they are self organizing.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Such inquirers will ask slaves about their condition; they forget that the slave must indeed be dull, who does not calculate on the chance of his answer reaching his master's ears.^ We had several quarrels; for instance, early in the voyage at Bahia, in Brazil, he defended and praised slavery, which I abominated, and told me that he had just visited a great slave−owner, who had called up many of his slaves and asked them whether they were happy, and whether they wished to be free, and all answered "No."
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We had several quarrels; for instance, early in the voyage at Bahia, in Brazil, he defended and praised slavery, which I abominated, and told me that he had just visited a great slave-owner, who had called up many of his slaves and asked them whether they were happy, and whether they wished to be free, and all answered "No."
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Indeed, as an agoraphobic -- someone who is afraid of both open spaces and enclosed places, who, when asked what he is afraid of, might plausibly reply "everything" -- he is obsessed with control and dreads revealing more of himself than he must.
    • Charles Darwin - Salon.com 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. .XXI : Mauritius To England
  • It is often attempted to palliate slavery by comparing the state of slaves with our poorer countrymen: if the misery of our poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin; but how this bears on slavery, I cannot see; as well might the use of the thumb-screw be defended in one land, by showing that men in another land suffered from some dreadful disease. Those who look tenderly at the slave owner, and with a cold heart at the slave, never seem to put themselves into the position of the latter; what a cheerless prospect, with not even a hope of change!^ Instinct (13) If the misery of our poor is caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ About thirty years ago there was much talk that geologists ought only to observe and not theorise; and I well remember some one saying that at this rate a man might as well go into a gravel-pit and count the pebbles and describe the colours.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We had several quarrels; for instance, early in the voyage at Bahia, in Brazil, he defended and praised slavery, which I abominated, and told me that he had just visited a great slave−owner, who had called up many of his slaves and asked them whether they were happy, and whether they wished to be free, and all answered "No."
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    picture to yourself the chance, ever hanging over you, of your wife and your little children — those objects which nature urges even the slave to call his own — being torn from you and sold like beasts to the first bidder! .And these deeds are done and palliated by men, who profess to love their neighbours as themselves, who believe in God, and pray that his Will be done on earth!^ People who have already rejected God cannot reprogram themselves.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Those who reject the doctrine that the earth is very young, say 5,000 to 10,000 years, are judged to be false believers.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Charles Darwin , the man who believed that all life on earth developed over millions of years from a few common ancestors.
    • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

    It makes one's blood boil, yet heart tremble, to think that we Englishmen and our American descendants, with their boastful cry of liberty, have been and are so guilty...
    • Ch. XXI : Mauritius To England

Origin of Species (1859)

.
  • We will now discuss in a little more detail the Struggle for Existence.^ Monkey (10) We will now discuss in a little more detail the Struggle for Existence.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Chapter iii. .Compare: "The perpetual struggle for room and food", Thomas Malthus, On Population, chapter iii.^ In the review of Quetelet, he found, among other things, a forceful statement of Malthus's quantitative claim--that population would grow geometrically and food supplies only arithmetically, thus guaranteeing an intense struggle for existence.
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Malthus argued that any increase in the availability of food for basic human survival could not match the geometrical rate of population growth.
      • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      p. 48 (1798).
  • The expression often used by Mr. Herbert Spencer of the Survival of the Fittest is more accurate, and is sometimes equally convenient. 2
    • Chapter iii. Compare: "This survival of the fittest which I have here sought to express in mechanical terms, is that which Mr. Darwin has called 'natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life'", Herbert Spencer, Principles of Biology, "Indirect Equilibration".
  • I should premise that I use the term Struggle for Existence in a large and Metaphorical Sense, including dependence of one being on another, and including (which is more important) success in leaving progeny.
  • Owing to this struggle for life, any variation, however slight and from whatever cause proceeding, if it be in any degree profitable to an individual of any species, in its infinitely complex relationship to other organic beings and to external nature, will tend to the preservation of that individual, and will generally be inherited by its offspring. The offspring, also, will thus have a better chance of surviving, for, of the many individuals of any species which are periodically born, but a small number can survive. .I have called this principle, by which each slight variation, if useful, is preserved, by the term Natural Selection, in order to mark its relation to man's power of selection.
  • If it could be demonstrated that any complex organ existed, which could not possibly have been formed by numerous, successive, slight modifications, my theory would absolutely break down.^ This brings me to my New Theory, which in truth is a slight variation of Charles Darwin s Old Theory, the world-famous principle of natural selection.
    • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Known for: Proposing the theory of natural selection .
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Charles Darwin wrote in The Origin of Species, "If it would be demonstrated that any complex organ existed which could not possibly have formed by numerous ...
    • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    But I can find out no such case.
    • This passage has often been quoted without the final sentence.
.
As some of the lowest organisms in which nerves cannot be detected, are capable of perceiving light, it does not seem impossible that certain sensitive elements in their sarcode should become aggregated and developed into nerves, endowed with this special sensibility.
  • To suppose that the eye with all its inimitable contrivances for adjusting the focus to different distances, for admitting different amounts of light, and for the correction of spherical and chromatic aberration, could have been formed by natural selection, seems, I freely confess, absurd in the highest degree.^ Biography (152) To suppose that the eye, with all its inimitable contrivances for adjusting the focus to different distances, for admitting different amounts of light, and for the correction of spherical and chromatic aberration, could have been formed by natural selection, seems, I freely confess, absurd in the highest possible degree.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ New species cannot evolve by natural selection.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ DNA cannot be changed into a new species by natural selection.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    .When it was first said that the sun stood still and the world turned round, the common sense of mankind declared the doctrine false; but the old saying of Vox populi, vox Dei, as every philosopher knows, cannot be trusted in science.
    Reason tells me, that if numerous gradations from a simple and imperfect eye to one complex and perfect can be shown to exist, each grade being useful to its possessor, as is certain the case; if further, the eye ever varies and the variations be inherited, as is likewise certainly the case; and if such variations should be useful to any animal under changing conditions of life, then the difficulty of believing that a perfect and complex eye could be formed by natural selection, should not be considered as subversive of the theory.^ Known for: Proposing the theory of natural selection .
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Known for: Proposing the theory of natural selection.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ DNA cannot be changed into a new species by natural selection.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    .How a nerve comes to be sensitive to light, hardly concerns us more than how life itself originated; but I may remark that, as some of the lowest organisms in which nerves cannot be detected, are capable of perceiving light, it does not seem impossible that certain sensitive elements in their sarcode should become aggregated and developed into nerves, endowed with this special sensibility.
    • The first sentence of this statement is often quoted without the context of the whole.^ Charles Darwin: More than the origin .

      ^ Origin Of Species (30) All that we can do, is to keep steadily in mind that each organic being is striving to increase at a geometrical ratio; that each at some period of its life, during some season of the year, during each generation or at intervals, has to struggle for life, and to suffer great destruction.
      • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Taste (5) At last gleams of light have come, and I am almost convinced (quite contrary to opinion I started with) that species are not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable.
      • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

      .Vox populi, vox Dei is Latin for "The voice of the people is the voice of God". "Sarcode" is an archaic word for protoplasm.
  • One general law, leading to the advancement of all organic beings, namely, multiply, vary, let the strongest live and the weakest die.
  • Lastly, isolation, by checking immigration and consequently competition, will give time for any new variety to be slowly improved; and this may sometimes be of importance in the production of new species.^ These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with Reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the external conditions of life, and from use and disuse; a Ratio of Increase so high as to lead to a Struggle for Life, and as a consequence to Natural Selection, entailing Divergence of Character and the Extinction of less-improved forms.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Origin Of Species (30) All that we can do, is to keep steadily in mind that each organic being is striving to increase at a geometrical ratio; that each at some period of its life, during some season of the year, during each generation or at intervals, has to struggle for life, and to suffer great destruction.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This subject, and that of the variation of our domestic productions, together with the causes and laws of variation, inheritance, and the intercrossing of plants, are the sole subjects which I have been able to write about in full, so as to use all the materials which I have collected.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .If, however, an isolated area be very small, either from being surrounded by barriers, or from having very peculiar physical conditions, the total number of the individuals supported on it will necessarily be very small; and fewness of individuals will greatly retard the production of new species through natural selection, by decreasing the chance of the appearance of favourable variations.^ Variation after 1859: Natural Selection .
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ New species cannot evolve by natural selection.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ DNA cannot be changed into a new species by natural selection.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.
    • Close of the First edition.^ "There is a grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed laws [ sic .
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Gould in his quote, which continues as follows] Whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.'"
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ There is a [simple] grandeur in this view of life with its several powers of growth, reproduction and of sensation, having been originally breathed into matter under a few forms, perhaps into only one, and that whilst this planet has gone cycling onwards according to the fixed laws of gravity and whilst land and water have gone on replacing each other--from so simple an origin, through the selection of infinitesimal varieties, endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been evolved [ STRESS added].
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      After the controversies generated by his book, the sixth edition here included the phrase "by the Creator" to read:
There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.
.
  • As many more individuals of each species are born than can possibly survive; and as, consequently, there is a frequently recurring struggle for existence, it follows that any being, if it vary however slightly in any manner profitable to itself, under the complex and sometimes varying conditions of life, will have a better chance of surviving, and thus be naturally selected.^ As many more individuals of each species are born than can possibly survive; and as, consequently, there is a frequently recurring struggle for existence, it follows that any being, if it vary however slightly in any manner profitable to itself, under the complex and sometimes varying conditions of life, will have a better chance of surviving, and thus be naturally selected.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Variation after 1859: Natural Selection .
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ In effect, nature selects the individuals with the best combinations of traits for survival.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    From the strong principle of inheritance, any selected variety will tend to propagate its new and modified form.

The Descent of Man (1871)

.
Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those who know little, not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science.
  • It has often and confidently been asserted, that man's origin can never be known: Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those who know little, not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science.
    • Introduction, p.^ "Despite its more explicitly materialistic interpretation of man's essence, Descent was not met with the rancor that earlier had engulfed Origin .
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ By "Agnostic" Huxley had signified not so much that one was simply unsure about whether there was a God, and not that one could never know.
      • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Culver Pictures Current knowledge of heredity is the result of more than 2000 years of contemplation of how inheritance works.
      • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .4
  • There is no fundamental difference between man and the higher animals in their mental faculties.^ There was no "gap" in his view between man and animals.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Animals, difference between plants and.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Man in this respect differs profoundly from the lower animals.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. .II : Comparison Of The Mental Powers Of Man And The Lower Animals, p.^ Man in this respect differs profoundly from the lower animals.
      • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

      .34
  • The lower animals, like man, manifestly feel pleasure and pain, happiness, and misery.^ I was also troubled with palpitation and pain about the heart, and like many a young ignorant man, especially one with a smattering of medical knowledge, was convinced that I had heart disease.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If plants are acted on by light, like some of the lower animals, there is an additional point of interest, as it seems to me, in your results.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals by Charles Darwin It?s a charming book about why we smile, why dogs shake their tails when they?re happy.
    • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

    .Happiness is never better exhibited than by young animals, such as puppies, kittens, lambs, etc., when playing together, like our own children.^ The knowledge that the earth is ancient rather than young has several important implications for our society.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ These features, together with their egg-laying ability, are more like that of a lizard than a mammal.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Darwin realized that he would have to have a better case than he did before announcing his own theory.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ... .The fact that the lower animals are excited by the same emotions as ourselves is so well established, that it will not be necessary to weary the reader by many details.^ The fact that a plant should secrete, when properly excited, a fluid containing an acid and ferment, closely analogous to the digestive fluid of an animal, was certainly a remarkable discovery.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This is a vivid and exciting travel memoir as well as a detailed scientific field journal, read by various readers...
    • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

    .Terror acts in the same manner on them as on us, causing the muscles to tremble, the heart to palpitate, the sphincters to be relaxed, and the hair to stand on end.^ Aquinas claims that natural bodies act always, or nearly always, to attain the same ends.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    Suspicion, the offspring of fear, is eminently characteristic of most wild animals. .Courage and timidity are extremely variable qualities in the individuals of the same species, as is plainly seen in our dogs.^ The birth of the species and of the individual are equally part of that grand sequence of events, which our minds refuse to accept as blind chance.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Variation (14) So in regard to mental qualities, their transmission is manifest in our dogs, horses and other domestic animals.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ These similarities and differences suggested to Darwin that the various finch species might be related to one another and that they had all arisen from the same ancestral species.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Some dogs and horses are ill-tempered, and easily turn sulky ; others are good- tempered; and these qualities are certainly inherited.^ The gene for self-recognition is turned on in some plants but not in others.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Variation (14) So in regard to mental qualities, their transmission is manifest in our dogs, horses and other domestic animals.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I then added that my wife and self thought that, under these new circumstances, he was most fully justified in altering his will and leaving his property in some other way.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. .II : Comparison Of The Mental Powers Of Man And The Lower Animals, p.^ Man in this respect differs profoundly from the lower animals.
      • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

      .38
  • As man advances in civilization, and small tribes are united into larger communities, the simplest reason would tell each individual that he ought to extend his social instincts and sympathies to all the members of the same nation, though personally unknown to him.^ Individual mice of an inbred strain, all having the same germ-line genes, have been shown to make use of entirely different sets of antibody molecules.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ "In the Origin Darwin tried to avoid extending his biological explanations into social and moral questions, but the extension was unavoidable and he made it himself in The Descent of Man.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ It is astonishing to me that Kingsley should have spoken of him as a man well fitted to advance science.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .This point being once reached, there is only an artificial barrier to prevent his sympathies extending to the men of all nations and races.
    If, indeed, such men are separated from him by great differences in appearance or habits, experience unfortunately shews us how long it is, before we look at them as our fellow-creatures.^ Such a council, as representing a large body of medical men, would have more power in the eyes of vote- hunting politicians than a small body representing only themselves.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All this shows how ambitious I was; but I think that I can say with truth that in after years, though I cared in the highest degree for the approbation of such men as Lyell and Hooker, who were my friends, I did not care much about the general public.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It was a large room with a high ceiling, and there on the sofa I saw him reaching out his hand to me.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Sympathy beyond the confines of man, that is, humanity to the lower animals, seems to be one of the latest moral acquisitions.^ John Dewey: "The evolution of the human race will not be accomplished in the ten thousand years of tame animals, but in the million years of wild animals, because man is and will always be a wild animal."
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ There is only one plausible explanation for the existence of the galaxies, stars, planets, humans, animals, all other life, matter and energy.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For people who accepted the biblical view of creation, the idea that human beings shared common roots with lower animals was shocking.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    It is apparently unfelt by savages, except towards their pets. .How little the old Romans knew of it is shewn by their abhorrent gladiatorial exhibitions.^ Long ago I dined occasionally with the old Earl, the father of the historian; he was a strange man, but what little I knew of him I liked much.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .The very idea of humanity, as far as I could observe, was new to most of the Gauchos of the Pampas.^ Farmers were increasing their animal yields by means of selected breeding and new ideas and interpretations of the rôle of human beings were being circulated and discussed.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Reform Darwinists argued that human beings need new ideas and institutions as they adapt to changing conditions.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ This paper also points out the "human" side of this most noted of human beings and Darwin's ideas are presented in the context of his times.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .This virtue, one of the noblest with which man is endowed, seems to arise incidentally from our sympathies becoming more tender and more widely diffused, until they are extended to all sentient beings.^ I was all the more attracted to it, from not being at all satisfied with the explanation which Henslow gave us in his lectures, about twining plants, namely, that they had a natural tendency to grow up in a spire.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Finch (3) Species do not grow more perfect: the weaker dominate the strong, again and again— the reason being that they are the great majority, and they are also cleverer .
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is an extremely interesting instance of a more fertile variety beating out a less fertile one, and, in this case, one much more valuable to man.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .As soon as this virtue is honoured and practised by some few men, it spreads through instruction and example to the young, and eventually becomes incorporated in public opinion.
    • Ch.^ Only a few of these individuals will begin new branches that will eventually become a new species such as a Zebra.
      • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ From my passion for shooting and for hunting, and, when this failed, for riding across country, I got into a sporting set, including some dissipated low−minded young men.
      • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ From my passion for shooting and for hunting, and, when this failed, for riding across country, I got into a sporting set, including some dissipated low-minded young men.
      • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]

      III : Comparison Of The Mental Powers Of Man And The Lower Animals; Concluding Remarks, p. .96
  • With savages, the weak in body or mind are soon eliminated; and those that survive commonly exhibit a vigorous state of health.^ Titanic Exhibit at the Luxor - one of those surviv...
    • Up channels: Charles Darwin - Charles Robert Darwin, an English naturalist[I] who realised and presented compelling evidence that all species of life have evolved 15 September 2009 6:40 UTC u.tearn.com [Source type: General]

    .We civilised men, on the other hand, do our utmost to check the process of elimination; we build asylums for the imbecile, the maimed, and the sick; we institute poor-laws; and our medical men exert their utmost skill to save the life of every one to the last moment.
    There is reason to believe that vaccination has preserved thousands, who from a weak constitution would formerly have succumbed to small-pox.^ On the other hand, as far as my experience goes, what one expects rarely happens.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Such a council, as representing a large body of medical men, would have more power in the eyes of vote- hunting politicians than a small body representing only themselves.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "There could be one hundred billion Earth-like planets in our galaxy, a US conference has heard."
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    Thus the weak members of civilised societies propagate their kind. .No one who has attended to the breeding of domestic animals will doubt that this must be highly injurious to the race of man.^ But then arises the doubt, can the mind of man, which has, as I fully believe, been developed by a mind as low as that possessed by the lowest animals, be trusted when it draws such grand conclusions?
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No one can doubt about his extraordinary power of drawing pictures of things and men—far more vivid, as it appears to me, than any drawn by Macaulay.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I soon perceived that selection was the keystone of man's success in making useful races of animals and plants.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .It is surprising how soon a want of care, or care wrongly directed, leads to the degeneration of a domestic race; but excepting in the case of man himself, hardly any one is so ignorant as to allow his worst animals to breed.^ I remember clearly only one other incident during this year whilst at Mr. Case's daily school,--namely, the burial of a dragoon soldier; and it is surprising how clearly I can still see the horse with the man's empty boots and carbine suspended to the saddle, and the firing over the grave.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I remember clearly only one other incident during this year whilst at Mr. Case's daily school,−−namely, the burial of a dragoon soldier; and it is surprising how clearly I can still see the horse with the man's empty boots and carbine suspended to the saddle, and the firing over the grave.
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ John Dewey: "The evolution of the human race will not be accomplished in the ten thousand years of tame animals, but in the million years of wild animals, because man is and will always be a wild animal."
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]


    .The aid which we feel impelled to give to the helpless is mainly an incidental result of the instinct of sympathy, which was originally acquired as part of the social instincts, but subsequently rendered, in the manner previously indicated, more tender and more widely diffused.^ Origin Of Species (30) One more word on 'designed laws' and 'undesigned results.'
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Nor could we check our sympathy, even at the urging of hard reason, without deterioration in the noblest part of our nature.
    The surgeon may harden himself whilst performing an operation, for he knows that he is acting for the good of his patient; but if we were intentionally to neglect the weak and helpless, it could only be for a contingent benefit, with an overwhelming present evil.^ These ages or periods where God performed specific acts of creation do not necessarily run consecutive without time periods in between.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It was very good fun bothering the seeds of Cucurbita by planting them edgeways, as would never naturally occur, and then the peg could not act properly.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It was very kind in you to write to me about the Orchideae, for it has pleased me to an extreme degree that I could have been of the least use to you about the nature of the parts.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .We must therefore bear the undoubtedly bad effects of the weak surviving and propagating their kind; but there appears to be at least one check in steady action, namely that the weaker and inferior members of society do not marry so freely as the sound; and this check might be indefinitely increased by the weak in body or mind refraining from marriage, though this is more to be hoped for than expected.
    • Ch.^ Such a council, as representing a large body of medical men, would have more power in the eyes of vote- hunting politicians than a small body representing only themselves.
      • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ I saw more of Lyell than of any other man, both before and after my marriage.
      • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ To this fund there are already a number of subscribers, whose names are taken by Professor Gerald Yeo, one of the secretaries of the Physiological Society.
      • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

      .V : Natural Selection as affecting Civilised Nations, p.^ Variations neither useful nor injurious would not be affected by natural selection and would be left a fluctuating element.
      • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

      161
.
Enforcement of public opinion depends on our appreciation of the approbation and disapprobation of others; and this appreciation is founded on our sympathy, which it can hardly be doubted was originally developed through natural selection as one of the most important elements of the social instincts.
  • The western nations of Europe, who now so immeasurably surpass their former savage progenitors, and stand at the summit of civilization, owe little or none of their superiority to direct inheritance from the old Greeks, though they owe much to the written works of that wonderful people...^ Australian savages and Natural Selection.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Reason tells me, that if numerous gradations from a perfect and complex eye to one very imperfect and simple, each grade being useful to its possessor, can be shown to exist; if further, the eye does vary ever so slightly, and the variations be inherited, which is certainly the case; and if any variation or modification in the organ be ever useful to an animal under changing conditions of life, then the difficulty of believing that a perfect and complex eye could be formed by natural selection, though insuperable by our imagination, can hardly be considered real.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ (English) (as Author) The Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, 6th Edition (English) (as Author) The Power of Movement in Plants (English) (as Author) The formation of vegetable mould through the action of worms, with observations on their habits (English) (as Author) Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication (English) (as Author) The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol.
    • Browse By Author: D - Project Gutenberg 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    .With highly civilised nations continued progress depends in a subordinate degree on natural selection; for such nations do not supplant and exterminate one another as do savage tribes. Nevertheless the more intelligent members within the same community will succeed better in the long run than the inferior, and leave a more numerous progeny, and this is a form of natural selection.^ Their scientific mentor, Charles Darwin , also made the same observation of the survival of the fittest (natural selection) which formed the basis for his ...
    • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Both are temples filled with the varied productions of the God of Nature: no one can stand in these solitudes unmoved, and not feel that there is more in man than the mere breath of his body.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because natural resources form on a geologic time scale, the rate at which they are naturally replenished is far slower than the rate at which they are currently being depleted.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .The more efficient causes of progress seem to consist of a good education during youth whilst the brain is impressible, and of a high standard of excellence, inculcated by the ablest and best men, embodied in the laws, customs and traditions of the nation, and enforced by public opinion.^ The Anti-Corn Law League owed much of its enormous power to several wealthy men laying down 1,000 pounds; for the subscription of a good sum of money is the best proof of earnest conviction.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He viewed racial mixing and the black presence in Brazil more generally as hindering the nation's progress.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ "It seems to me (rightly or wrongly) that direct arguments against Christianity and Theism hardly have any effect on the public; and that freedom of thought will best be promoted by that gradual enlightening of human understanding which follows the progress of science.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .It should, however, be borne in mind, that the enforcement of public opinion depends on our appreciation of the approbation and disapprobation of others; and this appreciation is founded on our sympathy, which it can hardly be doubted was originally developed through natural selection as one of the most important elements of the social instincts.
    • Ch.^ (English) (as Author) The Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, 6th Edition (English) (as Author) The Power of Movement in Plants (English) (as Author) The formation of vegetable mould through the action of worms, with observations on their habits (English) (as Author) Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication (English) (as Author) The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol.
      • Browse By Author: D - Project Gutenberg 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Variations neither useful nor injurious would not be affected by natural selection and would be left a fluctuating element.
      • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The next year, Darwin published On the Origin of Species , the book that made the theory of natural selection famous.
      • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .V : Natural Selection as affecting Civilised Nations.
  • At some future period, not very distant as measured by centuries, the civilised races of man will almost certainly exterminate, and replace the savage races throughout the world.^ Variations neither useful nor injurious would not be affected by natural selection and would be left a fluctuating element.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But this year, Honest Abe may be eclipsed by another famous bearded man: Charles Darwin , the 19th-century English naturalist who developed the theory of evolution by natural selection.
    • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Intellect (47) I have called this principle, by which each slight variation, if useful, is preserved, by the term Natural Selection, in order to mark its relation to man's power of selection.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    At the same time the anthropomorphous apes… will no doubt be exterminated. .The break between man and his nearest allies will then be wider, for it will intervene between man in a more civilised state, as we may hope, even than the Caucasian, and some ape as low as a baboon, instead of as now between the negro or Australian and the gorilla.^ I saw more of Lyell than of any other man, both before and after my marriage.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Moreover "wickedness is no more a man's fault than bodily disease!".
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nothing has left a more vivid picture on my mind than these evenings at Maer.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. .VI, On The Birthplace and Antiquity Of Man
  • It may be doubted whether any character can be named which is distinctive of a race and is constant.
    • Ch.^ He was an ardent disciple of Lavater, and was convinced that he could judge of a man's character by the outline of his features; and he doubted whether any one with my nose could possess sufficient energy and determination for the voyage.
      • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ I doubt whether this is at all trustworthy; but judged by this standard my name ought to last for a few years.
      • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]
      • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
      • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

      VII : On The Races of Man
.
The moral faculties are generally and justly esteemed as of higher value than the intellectual powers...
  • There is good evidence that the art of shooting with bows and arrows has not been handed down from any common progenitor of mankind, yet as Westropp and Nilsson have remarked, the stone arrow-heads, brought from the most distant parts of the world, and manufactured at the most remote periods, are almost identical; and this fact can only be accounted for by the various races having similar inventive or mental powers.^ The only fact of a similar kind of which I am aware is the constant asserted difference between the wolf-like Fox of East and West Falkland Islands.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Various derivative reports and accounts each of which changed parts of the story .
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Such a council, as representing a large body of medical men, would have more power in the eyes of vote- hunting politicians than a small body representing only themselves.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. .VII : On The Races of Man
  • Now when naturalists observe a close agreement in numerous small details of habits, tastes, and dispositions between two or more domestic races, or between nearly-allied natural forms, they use this fact as an argument that they are descended from a common progenitor who was thus endowed; and consequently that all should be classed under the same species.^ (English) (as Author) The Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, 6th Edition (English) (as Author) The Power of Movement in Plants (English) (as Author) The formation of vegetable mould through the action of worms, with observations on their habits (English) (as Author) Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication (English) (as Author) The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol.
    • Browse By Author: D - Project Gutenberg 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "But many naturalists think that something more is meant by the Natural System; they believe that it reveals the plan of the Creator ; but unless it be specified whether order in time or space, or both, or what else is meant by the plan of the Creator, it seems to me that nothing is thus added to our knowledge [ STRESS added]."
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ All they know is that the white stuff appears to have dissipated somewhat between the two dates.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    The same argument may be applied with much force to the races of man.
    .As it is improbable that the numerous and unimportant points of resemblance between the several races of man in bodily structure and mental faculties (I do not here refer to similar customs) should all have been independently acquired, they must have been inherited from progenitors who had these same characters.^ All they know is that the white stuff appears to have dissipated somewhat between the two dates.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Even science must be purged: for the gutter atheists, material atoms are all that exist, and like the 'social atoms' - people - they are self organizing.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ They believe that many structures have been created for the sake of beauty, to delight man or the Creator (but this latter point is beyond the scope of scientific discussion) , or for the sake of mere variety, a view already discussed [ STRESS added]."
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    • Ch. .VII : On The Races of Man
  • False facts are highly injurious to the progress of science, for they often endure long; but false views, if supported by some evidence, do little harm, for every one takes a salutary pleasure in proving their falseness.^ Robert Jameson (2) False facts are highly injurious to the progress of science, for they often long endure; but false views, if supported by some evidence, do little harm, as every one takes a salutary pleasure in proving their falseness; and when this is done, one path towards error is closed and the road to truth is often at the same time opened.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They modify fossil evidence in an attempt to support their false theories.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They are wonderful creatures, these orchids, and I sometimes think with a glow of pleasure, when I remember making out some little point in their method of fertilisation.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. .XXI : General Summary and Conclusion
  • Through the means just specified, aided perhaps by others as yet undiscovered, man has been raised to his present state.^ My memory is extensive, yet hazy: it suffices to make me cautious by vaguely telling me that I have observed or read something opposed to the conclusion which I am drawing, or on the other hand in favour of it; and after a time I can generally recollect where to search for my authority.
    • Charles Darwin, "Autobiography," 1902 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.stephenjaygould.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    .But since he attained to the rank of manhood, he has diverged into distinct races, or as they may be more fitly called, sub-species.^ These units of wrapped DNA are called nucleosomes, and they coil and fold into structures called chromosomes.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ That may be the most distinct characteristic of Homo sapiens as compared with other species.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ His theory of evolution flouted conventional wisdom, contending that women were actually more hardy and therefore more necessary than males because they were able to preserve the species.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Some of these, such as the Negro and European, are so distinct that, if specimens had been brought to a naturalist without any further information, they would undoubtedly have been considered by him as good and true species.^ As I was not able to work all day at science, I read a good deal during these two years on various subjects, including some metaphysical books; but I was not well fitted for such studies.
    • Charles Darwin's autobiography 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.victorianweb.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Darwin would probably do some things differently and some things the same but he would definitely incorporate information on genetics and Deoxyribonucleic research into a 1990s Origin .
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The understanding revolts at such a conclusions, whether or not we are able to believe that every slight variation of structure have all been ordained for some special purpose.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Ch. XXI : General Summary and Conclusion
  • The moral faculties are generally and justly esteemed as of higher value than the intellectual powers. .But we should bear in mind that the activity of the mind in vividly recalling past impressions is one of the fundamental though secondary bases of conscience.^ If, on the other hand, no one else has guaranteed for as much as twenty guineas, will you put me down for ten or fifteen guineas, though I should like to give twenty best.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .This affords the strongest argument for educating and stimulating in all possible ways the intellectual faculties of every human being.
    • Ch.^ Darwin demonstrated (with an immense amount of data that every educated person of the times could comprehend) that while human beings consciously practice domestic selection, nature practices natural selection.
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ To the contrary, all Darwin had to write about human beings in the first edition of Origin in 1859 was the following: .
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Genes allow for people to be short, tall, fat, thin, blond, brunette, etc., but they are still all human beings.
      • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

      XXI : General Summary And Conclusion
  • When the principles of breeding and of inheritance are better understood, we shall not hear ignorant members of our legislature rejecting with scorn a plan for ascertaining by an easy method whether or not consanguineous marriages are injurious to man.
    • Ch. .XXI : General Summary And Conclusion
  • There should be open competition for all men; and the most able should not be prevented by laws or customs from succeeding best and rearing the largest number of offspring.^ According to natural selection, the members of the bird species with the smallest useless wing would be the most adaptable and most likely to survive in the largest numbers.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It should actually be noted that in general (and Woodward was an exception) 'most theorists were not field-workers, and most field-workers did not write theories'.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Important as the struggle for existence has been and even still is, yet as far as the highest part of man's nature is concerned there are other agencies more important.^ "In the future I see open fields for far more important researches.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ "In the distant future I see open fields for far more important researches.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ "The idea that evolution by natural selection could account for the origin of man was taken up by others as a direct result of Darwin's ideas.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .For the moral qualities are advanced, either directly or indirectly, much more through the effects of habit, the reasoning powers, instruction, religion, &c., than through natural selection; though to this latter agency may be safely attributed the social instincts, which afforded the basis for the development of the moral sense.
    • Ch.^ (English) (as Author) The Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, 6th Edition (English) (as Author) The Power of Movement in Plants (English) (as Author) The formation of vegetable mould through the action of worms, with observations on their habits (English) (as Author) Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication (English) (as Author) The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol.
      • Browse By Author: D - Project Gutenberg 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.gutenberg.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Their scientific mentor, Charles Darwin , also made the same observation of the survival of the fittest (natural selection) which formed the basis for his ...
      • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ But this year, Honest Abe may be eclipsed by another famous bearded man: Charles Darwin , the 19th-century English naturalist who developed the theory of evolution by natural selection.
      • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

      .XXI : General Summary And Conclusion
  • We must, however, acknowledge, as it seems to me, that man with all his noble qualities, with sympathy which feels for the most debased, with benevolence which extends not only to other men but to the humblest living creature, with his god-like intellect which has penetrated into the movements and constitution of the solar system — with all these exalted powers — Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin.
    • Ch.^ Some looked like living creatures, others didn't, and opinions on their origins varied.
      • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ I have given the evidence to the best of my ability; and we must acknowledge, as it seems to me, that man with all his noble qualities, with sympathy which feels for the most debased, with benevolence which extends not only to other men but to the humblest living creature, with his god-like intellect which has penetrated into the movements and constitution of the solar system—with all these exalted powers—Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin.
      • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ My God, it is Intolerable to think of spending ones whole life, like a neuter bee, working, working& nothing after all.No, no, won't do.
      • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

      XXI : General Summary And Conclusion

The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887)

The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887) Edited by his son Francis Darwin, including an abridged version of the Autobiography.
Life is nearly over with me. .I have taken no pains about my style of writing.
  • I have attempted to write the following account of myself, as if I were a dead man in another world looking back at my own life.^ Once again, Charles Darwin took great care NOT to write about Homo sapiens in Origin in 1859 and all he had to say about "man" in the volume was: .
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ It has, therefore, been always my object to avoid writing on religion, & I have confined myself to science.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ My God, it is Intolerable to think of spending ones whole life, like a neuter bee, working, working& nothing after all.No, no, won't do.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    Nor have I found this difficult, for life is nearly over with me. .I have taken no pains about my style of writing.^ My son will write to you about the diagram.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We had to write a biography about a influential person and my was Charles Darwin .
    • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

    • Ch. 2 "Autobiography"
  • Dr. Grant took me occasionally to the meetings of the Wernerian Society, where various papers on natural history were read, discussed, and afterwards published in the 'Transactions.' I heard Audubon deliver there some interesting discourses on the habits of N. American birds, sneering somewhat unjustly at Waterton. .By the way, a negro lived in Edinburgh, who had travelled with Waterton, and gained his livelihood by stuffing birds, which he did excellently: he gave me lessons for payment, and I used often to sit with him, for he was a very pleasant and intelligent man.^ He cared for all our pursuits and interests, and lived our lives with us in a way that very few fathers do.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Voyage of the Beagle : Darwins job as naturalist aboard the Beagle gave him the opportunity to observe the various geological formations found on different continents and islands along the way, as well as a huge variety of fossils and living organisms.
    • Charles Robert Darwin�s Accomplishments 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fjcollazo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Darwin began his interests in natural history while a student at Cambridge and while there, it was Professor Henslow who persuaded him to become interested in Geology, after his disastrous Edinburgh experiences.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    • Ch. 2 "Autobiography"
  • Fitz-Roy's temper was a most unfortunate one. It was usually worst in the early morning, and with his eagle eye he could generally detect something amiss about the ship, and was then unsparing in his blame. .He was very kind to me, but was a man very difficult to live with on the intimate terms which necessarily followed from our messing by ourselves in the same cabin.^ He cared for all our pursuits and interests, and lived our lives with us in a way that very few fathers do.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Very many thanks for your most kind note, but you think too highly of our work--not but what this is very pleasant.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    .We had several quarrels; for instance, early in the voyage at Bahia, in Brazil, he defended and praised slavery, which I abominated, and told me that he had just visited a great slave-owner, who had called up many of his slaves and asked them whether they were happy, and whether they wished to be free, and all answered "No."^ The Bedford companys early customers included Charles Darwin and Dr David Livingstone who used many of the early Casella products on their travels of ...
    • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The founding fathers of the Constitution and the early government wanted all denominations to be able to worship freely.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It tried to combine materialism (which was more the base of Sedgwick's objections than the evolution as such) whilst keeping a deistic God who set it all up.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I then asked him, perhaps with a sneer, whether he thought that the answer of slaves in the presence of their master was worth anything?^ Darwin's qualms as he thought about ordination were not about orthodoxy, but about whether he could really, when asked in the ordination service, claim that he had been "inwardly moved by the Holy Spirit" to ordination.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Biography (152) A young man once asked [Erasmus Darwin] in, as he thought, an offensive manner, whether he did not find stammering very inconvenient.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    .This made him excessively angry, and he said that as I doubted his word we could not live any longer together.^ The odds that the correct proteins could somehow come together in a functional configuration to make a living cell are so high that it will never happen.
    • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

    .I thought that I should have been compelled to leave the ship; but as soon as the news spread, which it did quickly, as the captain sent for the first lieutenant to assuage his anger by abusing me, I was deeply gratified by receiving an invitation from all the gun-room officers to mess with them.^ Emma expressed her concerns to her husband and in a letter she sent his shortly after they were married in 1839, Emma wrote that "everything that concerns you concerns me and I should be most unhappy if I thought we did not belong to each other forever."
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ While Strauss did not actually state that the New Testament was untrue, he did claim that it should not be read as a factual record of events.
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ I then added that my wife and self thought that, under these new circumstances, he was most fully justified in altering his will and leaving his property in some other way.
    • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

    But after a few hours Fitz-Roy showed his usual magnanimity by sending an officer to me with an apology and a request that I would continue to live with him.
    • Ch. 2 "Autobiography"

Autobiography (1958)

The autobiography of Charles Darwin 1809-1882. With the original omissions restored. (1958) Edited and with appendix and notes by his grand-daughter Nora Barlow.
.
  • I can indeed hardly see how anyone ought to wish Christianity to be true; for if so the plain language of the text seems to show that the men who do not believe, and this would include my Father, Brother, and almost all my best friends, will be everlastingly punished.^ If it were, "the plain language" of the New Testament "seems to show that the men who do not believe, and this would include my father, brother and almost all my best friends, will be everlastingly punished.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I can, indeed, hardly see how anyone ought to wish Christianity to be true; for if so the plain language of the text seems to show that men who do not believe, and this would include my Father, Brother and almost all my best friends, will be everlastingly punished.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ His dithering had crystallized into a moral conviction so strict the he could not "see how anyone ought to wish Christianity to be true."
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    .And this is a damnable doctrine.
  • Although I did not think much about the existence of a personal God until a considerably later period of my life, I will here give the vague conclusions to which I have been driven.^ By "Agnostic" Huxley had signified not so much that one was simply unsure about whether there was a God, and not that one could never know.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ My God, it is Intolerable to think of spending ones whole life, like a neuter bee, working, working& nothing after all.No, no, won't do.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The eye to this day gives me a cold shudder, but when I think of the fine known gradations, my reason tells me I ought to conquer the cold shudder.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    .The old argument from design in Nature, as given by Paley, which formerly seemed to me so conclusive, fails, now that the law of natural selection has been discovered.^ His ideas, now defunct in the face of Charles Darwin and Sir Alfred Wallace's theory of natural selection, launched a revolution in biology.
    • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ On the one hand natural selection seemed to open the door to the possibility that creatures could have evolved purely accidentally, and Darwin felt a moral revulsion against the idea that suffering and death could form a part of a design plan.
    • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This brings me to my New Theory, which in truth is a slight variation of Charles Darwin s Old Theory, the world-famous principle of natural selection.
    • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    We can no longer argue that, for instance, the beautiful hinge of a bivalve shell must have been made by an intelligent being, like the hinge of a door by man. .There seems to be no more design in the variability of organic beings, and in the action of natural selection, than in the course which the wind blows.^ Variation after 1859: Natural Selection .
    • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Variations neither useful nor injurious would not be affected by natural selection and would be left a fluctuating element.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Both are temples filled with the varied productions of the God of Nature: no one can stand in these solitudes unmoved, and not feel that there is more in man than the mere breath of his body.
    • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

    But I have discussed this subject at the end of my book on the 'Variation of Domesticated Animals and Plants,' and the argument there given has never, as far as I can see, been answered.

Misquoted

Darwin's material is often misquoted. .See Notable Charles Darwin misquotes.^ Charles Darwin Mind , 1877 See also: .
  • Charles Darwin Quotes - Dictionary of Science Quotations and Scientist Quotes 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.todayinsci.com [Source type: Original source]

^ When you see a bird or any creature acting in a way contrary to all reason, you dont have to be Charles Darwin to work out the reason why.
  • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Discovery Institute indicates that the overwhelming majority of Americans want to see both the strengths and weaknesses of Charles Darwin's theory of ...
  • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Misattributed

.
  • It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but rather the one most adaptable to change.
    • The earliest known appearance of this basic statement is a paraphrase of Darwin in the writings of Leon C. Megginson, a management sociologist at Louisiana State University.^ Ruse is director of the history and philosophy of science program at Florida State University, and the author of several acclaimed books on Charles Darwin .
      • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Kamila Shamsie, Reza Aslan and Charles Darwin's writings Guardian Unlimited, May 31, 2009 ...The final Haycast from the 2009 Guardian Hay festival opens with an interview with one of the festival's most highly-anticipated authors, Kamila Shamsie.
      • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

      ^ Charles Darwin , who got his survival-of-the-fittest idea from an economics text, once wrote that, "It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the ...
      • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .Megginson's paraphrase (with slight variations) was later turned into a quotation.^ He made a considerable number of experiments by injecting various reagents into the tissues of leaves, and with some slight indications of success.
      • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

      .See the summary of Nicholas Matzke's findings in "One thing Darwin didn't say: the source for a misquotation" at the Darwin Correspondence Project.^ Some of the things Darwin says in it are economical with the truth, a reconstruction of history with a faltering memory of what Darwin was actually thinking (or even actually did) in younger days.
      • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Scientists are finding too many things that the elegant evolutionary theory of Charles Darwin cannot explain.
      • Charles Darwin 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.wikihobo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ "Darwin taught us all to see more clearly what everyone had seen, and Darwin also taught us to think, along with him, what no one else had thought.
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .The statement is incorrectly attributed, without any source, to Clarence Darrow in Improving the Quality of Life for the Black Elderly: Challenges and Opportunities : Hearing before the Select Committee on Aging, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, first session, September 25, 1987 (1988).
  • A mathematician is a blind man in a dark room looking for a black cat which isn't there.
    • This is attributed, with an expression of doubt as to its correctness, in Mathematics, Our Great Heritage : Essays on the Nature and Cultural Significance of Mathematics (1948) by William Leonard Schaaf, p.^ The evidence is overwhelming that Darwin had been collecting information on changes within species for numerous years and he started his serious note-taking on the theory of evolution on September 28, 1838, "when he wrote down his first clear statement of the principle of evolution through natural selection [Howard Gruber, 1974, Darwin On Man: A Psychological Study Of Creativity , page 261]."
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ "When Darwin deduced the theory of natural selection to explain the adaptations in which he had previously seen the handiwork of God, he knew that he was committing cultural murder.
      • URBANOWICZ ON DARWIN/September 1996 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.csuchico.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ First Edition of Darwin Book Sells for $170,569 Cultural Heritage News Agency, November 25, 2009 ...distinctive green spine after visiting an exhibition on Darwin, Artdaily reported.
      • Charles Darwin – Author Profile and Information & Video at Simon & Schuster 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC authors.simonandschuster.com [Source type: General]

      163; also attributed in Pie in the Sky : Counting, Thinking and Being (1992). .There are a number of similar expressions to this with various attributions, but the earliest published variants seem to be quotations of Lord Bowen:
    • When I hear of an 'equity' in a case like this, I am reminded of a blind man in a dark room — looking for a black hat — which isn't there.
      • Lord Bowen, as quoted in in Pie Powder", Being Dust from the Law Courts: Collected and Recollected on the Western Circuit, by a Circuit Tramp (1911) by John Alderson Foote; this seems to be the earliest account of any similar expression.^ It gives all my observations and an immense number of facts collected from various sources, about our domestic productions.
        • Autobiography Of Charles Darwin, The 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

        ^ He is a man about whom vast amounts (of very varying quality) have been published.
        • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

        ^ Moreover they vary according to age, and perhaps from vigour of growth, and there seems inherent variability, as Strasburger (whom I quote) found with spores.
        • More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II by Charles Darwin - Full Text Free Book (Part 9/14) 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

        .It is mentioned by the author that this expression has become misquoted as a "black cat" rather than "black hat."
    • With his obscure and uncertain speculations as to the intimate nature and causes of things, the philosopher is likened to a 'blind man in a dark room looking for a black cat that is not there.'
      • William James, himself apparently quoting someone else's expression, in Some Problems of Philosophy : A Beginning of an Introduction to Philosophy (1911) Ch.^ "Without DNA repair there can be some major problems.
        • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

        ^ Darwin would, of it would have seemed to him absurd to suppose that this would involve renouncing evolution itself rather than just some of his materialistic assumptions.
        • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

        ^ Darwin himself had become indirectly involved in the gospel and temperance movement through an Irish member of the Brethren church James Fegan.
        • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

        1 : Philosophy and its Critics
    • A blind man in a dark room seeking for a black cat — which is not there.
      • A definition of metaphysics attributed to Lord Bowen, as quoted in Science from an Easy Chair (1913) by Edwin Ray Lankester, p. 99
    • A blind man in a dark room looking for a black cat which isn't there.
      • A definition of metaphysics attributed to Lord Balfour, as quoted in God in Our Work: Religious Addresses (1949) by Richard Stafford Cripps, p. 72
    • A philosopher is a blind man in a dark room looking for a black cat that isn't there. A theologian is the man who finds it.
      • H. L. Mencken, as quoted in Peter's Quotations : Ideas for Our Time (1977) by Laurence J. Peter, p.. .427
    • A metaphysician is like a blind man in a dark room, looking for a black cat — which isn't there.^ He accepted that all this resulted from God's natural laws, and if it looked like leading to a godless conclusion, a "Man would earnestly pray "deliver us from temptation".'
      • Dr Paul Marston: Charles Darwin and Christian Faith 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC scibel.com [Source type: Original source]

      ^ The cheetah in Africa is an example of an animal in the cat family with very limited variety in the DNA. Each cheetah looks like an identical twin.
      • Top Ten Scientific Facts Proving Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution IsWrong, False, and Impossible. 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.biblelife.org [Source type: Original source]

      • Variant published in Smiles and Chuckles (1952) by B. Hagspiel

See also

External links

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Charles Darwin (1809-1882)
.Charles Robert Darwin - (12.II.1809 - 19.IV.1882).^ CHARLES DARWIN (1809-1882) IT'S TIME FOR THE TRUTH TO BE TOLD...
  • Charles Darwin; Time For the Truth to be Told 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.ukapologetics.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Charles Robert Darwin, aged 45 in 1854, pondering his ideas on the origin of species.
  • CBC Radio | Ideas | Features 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC www.cbc.ca [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Charles Robert Darwin Quotes and Quotations, Famous Quotes by Authors .
  • Charles Robert Darwin Quotes and Quotations, Famous Quotes by Authors 15 September 2009 6:40 UTC www.yuni.com [Source type: Original source]

English naturalist. .Wrote On The Origin of Species.^ Template:Harvnb Template:Harvnb He later wrote that such facts "seemed to me to throw some light on the origin of species".
  • Charles Darwin - Hwiki 10 February 2010 13:13 UTC hwiki.fzk.de [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ English biologist; discovered evolution by natural selection; wrote "The Origin of Species" 1859 .
  • Charles Darwin - Author details and biography - The Quotations Page 19 January 2010 8:49 UTC www.quotationspage.com [Source type: General]

^ In 1857 Wallace wrote On the Law which has Regulated the Introduction of New Species and On the Tendency of Varieties to Depart Indefinitely from the Original Type, which he sent to Darwin, among others.


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 02, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Charles Darwin, which are similar to those in the above article.








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