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Charles W. Davis
February 21, 1917(1917-02-21) – January 18, 1991 (aged 73)
Place of birth Gordo, Alabama
Place of burial Arlington National Cemetery
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Army
Rank Colonel
Unit 25th Infantry Division
Battles/wars World War II
*Guadalcanal Campaign
Korean War
Vietnam War
Awards Medal of Honor

Charles W. Davis (February 21, 1917 – January 18, 1991) was a United States Army officer and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in World War II.

Contents

Biography

Davis joined the Army from Montgomery, Alabama, and by January 12, 1943 was serving as a captain in the 25th Infantry Division. On that day, on the island of Guadalcanal, he volunteered to carry messages to several companies which were pinned down by Japanese fire. He stayed with the companies overnight and on the next day personally led a successful attack against a Japanese-held hill. He was subsequently promoted to major and, on July 17, 1943, awarded the Medal of Honor.

Davis reached the rank of colonel and served in the Korean and Vietnam Wars before leaving the Army. He died at age 73 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington County, Virginia.

Medal of Honor citations

Davis' official Medal of Honor citation reads:

For distinguishing himself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy on Guadalcanal Island. On January 12, 1943, Maj. Davis (then Capt.), executive officer of an infantry battalion, volunteered to carry instructions to the leading companies of his battalion which had been caught in crossfire from Japanese machineguns. With complete disregard for his own safety, he made his way to the trapped units, delivered the instructions, supervised their execution, and remained overnight in this exposed position. On the following day, Maj. Davis again volunteered to lead an assault on the Japanese position which was holding up the advance. When his rifle jammed at its first shot, he drew his pistol and, waving his men on, led the assault over the top of the hill. Electrified by this action, another body of soldiers followed and seized the hill. The capture of this position broke Japanese resistance and the battalion was then able to proceed and secure the corps objective. The courage and leadership displayed by Maj. Davis inspired the entire battalion and unquestionably led to the success of its attack.

See also

References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Army Center of Military History.
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