The Full Wiki

More info on Charles de Valois, Duc de Berry

Charles de Valois, Duc de Berry: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

French Monarchy
Capetian Dynasty
(House of Valois)
France Ancient.svg

Philip VI
Children
   John II
John II
Children
   Charles V
   Louis I of Anjou
   John, Duke of Berry
   Philip the Bold
Charles V
Children
   Charles VI
   Louis, Duke of Orléans
Charles VI
Children
   Isabella of Valois
   Michelle of Valois
   Catherine of Valois
   Charles VII
Charles VII
Children
   Louis XI
   Charles, Duke of Berry
Louis XI
Children
   Charles VIII
Charles VIII

Charles de Valois (26 December 1446 – 24 May 1472) was the son of Charles VII, King of France and Marie of Anjou. He spent most of his life plotting against his brother Louis XI and held the title Charles II, Duke of Normandy. He would be Charles V of Aquitaine (Guyenne) if you count Charles, 5th Dauphin; the Carolingian kings of Aquitaine: Charles I of Aquitaine (Charlemagne), Charles II the Bald), and Charles III the Child.

Charles was born at Tours, last child and fourth son of Charles VII and Marie of Anjou. In 1461, Louis XI granted Charles the Duchy of Berry as an appanage. Charles was dissatisfied with this compensation, and joined with Charles, Count of Charolais (the future Duke of Burgundy, better known as Charles the Bold) and other powerful nobles such as Francis II, Duke of Brittany in the League of the Public Weal in May 1465, provoking the Guerre folle (Mad War).

The war ended in October, with the Treaty of Conflans signed between Louis XI and the Count of Charolais. Charles was granted an additional appanage by his brother, the Duchy of Normandy, of which he was the last independent ruler. Charles proved unable to control his new possession, coming into conflict with his former ally Francis II of Brittany. Louis dispatched the royal army to Normandy, dispossessing Charles, who, now reconciled with Duke Francis, fled to Brittany.

He remained an exile until September 1468, when he and Francis signed the Treaty of Ancenis with Louis, promising to abandon the former Count of Charolais, now the Duke of Burgundy. Louis, imprisoned by Charles of Burgundy in October 1468 during a conference at Péronne, agreed to grant Champagne to his brother as compensation for Normandy, a promise which he lost no time in breaking after his release.

However, the brothers were reconciled in April 1469, and Charles was granted the Duchy of Guyenne as compensation. At the same time, the betrothal of Charles to Mary of Burgundy, Charles of Burgundy's only child and heir to the duchy, was announced, but Louis had no intention of allowing such a marriage to take place. He dispatched envoys to Pope Paul II to ensure that the necessary dispensation, required on grounds of consanguinity, was not granted. The Pope nonetheless granted the dispensation, but the marriage plan still came to nothing.

Charles, however, died at Bordeaux in May 1472 before any marriage could take place, probably from a combination of tuberculosis and a venereal disease contracted from his mistress, Colette de Chambes (who, legend has it, had been fed poisoned fish by her aged but jealous husband, Louis d'Amboise, viscount of Thouars).[1] Charles left no legitimate issue and his lands returned to the crown. His daughter by the viscountess, Anne batarde de Valois, died childless not long after her marriage in 1490 to François de Volvire, Baron of Russec.[2]

French royalty
Preceded by
Louis, Dauphin of France
Heir to the Throne
as Heir presumptive
22 July 1461 — 4 December 1466
Succeeded by
Francis, Dauphin of France
Preceded by
Francis, Dauphin of France
Heir to the Throne
as Heir presumptive
4 December 1466 — 30 June 1470
Succeeded by
Charles, Dauphin of France
French nobility
Preceded by:
new creations
Duke of Berry
1461–1465
Succeeded by:
to royal domain
Duke of Normandy
1465–1466
Duke of Guyenne
1469–1472

References

  1. ^ "Nicole de Chambes". Genealogical database. Gene Web. http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=263048. Retrieved 2008-07-09.  
  2. ^ "Anne de Valois". Genealogical database. Gene Web. http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=67928. Retrieved 2008-07-09.  
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message