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Coordinates: 53°22′55″N 2°12′11″W / 53.382°N 2.203°W / 53.382; -2.203

Cheadle and Marple Sixth Form College
CAMSFC.JPG
Motto Working with you to succeed
Established 15 August 1995
Type State Funded 6th Form
Principal Christina Cassidy
Location Stockport
Greater Manchester
England
LEA Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council
Gender Mixed
Ages 16+
Website www.camsfc.ac.uk

Cheadle and Marple Sixth Form College, or CAMSFC, is a sixth form college in Stockport. It has two campuses, one in Cheadle Hulme and the other in Marple.

The college offers a very wide range of courses, including GCSEs, AS and A Levels, International Baccalaureate, vocational NVQs and BTECs, and Access courses for adults.

History

The newly built Cheadle County Grammar School for Girls in 1956

In 1946, following the Education Act 1944, a building known as Moseley Hall was acquired by the local authority for £6,500, and converted into a grammar school, which took its name from the building it occupied. It was situated north-west down the road from the current campus, and bordered neighbouring Cheadle. It was originally co-educational, but in 1956 a new school was built where the current Cheadle campus is today, and this became Cheadle County Grammar School for Girls. Moseley Hall therefore became a boys-only school.

In 1970, a new school was built adjacent to the girls' school. It cost £370,000, and became known as Cheadle Moseley Boys' Grammar School.[1] The two schools, whilst next to each other, remained separate, despite plans to merge them.[2][3] The boys' school at one time had its own railway line.[4] Moseley Hall was eventually demolished in the late 1970s and replaced by a hotel and entertainment complex.[5]

The schools were eventually merged and became known as The Manor County Secondary School. In 1991 it was converted into a college of further education: the girls' school became known as the Bulkley Building, and the boys' school became the Moseley Building. Initially the college was called Margaret Danyers College.

The Marple Campus was initially called Marple Ridge College. In 1995 Margaret Danyers College and Marple Ridge College combined to become Ridge Danyers College with two campuses.[6] There were some problems with the Cheadle Campus as part of the Moseley building was declared unsafe in the early 1990s due to the decay of the reinforced concrete with which it was constructed. This building was eventually demolished in August 2001, and replaced by a new building. In October 2004 the college changed its name to CAMSFC (Cheadle and Marple Sixth Form College).[7] It was the largest college in the country in 2004, with around 9000 students.[8]

References

  1. ^ "Old school may be demolished". Stockport Express. 20 May 1971.  
  2. ^ "500 parents of the school girls in crushing "No" to merger with boys". Stockport Express. 27 March 1975.  
  3. ^ "Schools can stay single sex". Stockport Express. 12 February 1976.  
  4. ^ Lee, Janette (23 September 1976). "Full steam ahead for school railway club". Stockport Express.  
  5. ^ Johnson, Terry (19 April 2002). "A reunion quest goes worldwide". Manchester Evening News.  
  6. ^ "The Ridge College, Stockport and Margaret Danyers College (Dissolution) Order 1995". Office of Public Sector Information. http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si1995/Uksi_19951927_en_1.htm. Retrieved 6 June 2009.  
  7. ^ "Letter from College website" (doc). Cheadle and Marple Sixth Form College. September 2007. http://www.camsfc.ac.uk/img/files/recruitment-covering-letter-without-curr-areas-(sept-07).doc. Retrieved 6 June 2009.  
  8. ^ "GCE Advanced Level Providers In England" (PDF). Nuffield 14-19 review. http://www.nuffield14-19review.org.uk/files/documents157-1.pdf. Retrieved 6 June 2009.  

External links

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