The Full Wiki

ChemSpider: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chemspider
Founded United States
Headquarters Raleigh, North Carolina February, 2007
Key people Antony Williams, President
Industry Internet, Information science
Parent Royal Society of Chemistry
Website www.ChemSpider.com

Chemspider is a chemical database. The system was first launched in March 2007 in a beta release form and transitioned to release in March 2008. ChemSpider has expanded the generic support of a chemistry database to include support of the Wikipedia chemical structure collection via their WiChempedia implementation. ChemSpider was acquired by the Royal Society of Chemistry in May, 2009.[1]

Contents

Database

The database contains more than 20 million unique molecules from the following sources

The database can be updated with user contributions including chemical structure deposition, spectra deposition and user curation.

Searching

A number of available search modules are provided

Chemistry document mark-up

The ChemSpider database has been used in combination with text mining as the basis of chemistry document markup. ChemMantis[2], the Chemistry Markup And Nomenclature Transformation Integrated System uses algorithms to identify and extract chemical names from documents and web pages and converts the chemical names to chemical structures using name-to-structure conversion algorithms and dictionary look-ups in the ChemSpider database. The result is an integrated system between chemistry documents and information look-up via ChemSpider into over 150 data sources.

Commercial versus free

The ChemSpider service is owned by the Royal Society of Chemistry, and its services are offered free of charge. Search hits include both free information and pointers into commercial databases that may require a subscription for access. Prior to the acquisition by RSC, ChemSpider was controlled by a private corporation, ChemZoo Inc.

Services

A number of services are made available online. These include the conversion of chemical names to chemical structures, the generation of SMILES and InChI strings as well as the prediction of many physicochemical parameters and integration to a web service allowing NMR prediction. The organization is working with RSC to develop a hash table resolver for InChIKeys, shorter hashed forms of InChIs.

See also

References

  1. ^ "RSC acquires ChemSpider". Royal Society of Chemistry. 11 May 2009. http://www.rsc.org/AboutUs/News/PressReleases/2009/ChemSpider.asp. Retrieved 2009-05-11. 
  2. ^ Welcome ChemMantis to ChemZoo and a Call for Contributions from the Community,2008-10-23, A. Williams,blog post

External links

Advertisements

Chemspider
Industry Internet, Information science
Founded
Headquarters Raleigh, North Carolina February, 2007
Key people Antony Williams, President
Parent Royal Society of Chemistry
Website www.ChemSpider.com

Chemspider is a chemical database. The system was first launched in March 2007 in a beta release form and transitioned to release in March 2008. ChemSpider has expanded the generic support of a chemistry database to include support of the Wikipedia chemical structure collection via their WiChempedia implementation. ChemSpider was acquired by the Royal Society of Chemistry in May, 2009.[1]

Contents

Database

The database contains more than 20 million unique molecules from the following sources

The database can be updated with user contributions including chemical structure deposition, spectra deposition and user curation.

Searching

A number of available search modules are provided

Chemistry document mark-up

The ChemSpider database has been used in combination with text mining as the basis of chemistry document markup. ChemMantis[2], the Chemistry Markup And Nomenclature Transformation Integrated System uses algorithms to identify and extract chemical names from documents and web pages and converts the chemical names to chemical structures using name-to-structure conversion algorithms and dictionary look-ups in the ChemSpider database. The result is an integrated system between chemistry documents and information look-up via ChemSpider into over 150 data sources.

Commercial versus free

The ChemSpider service is owned by the Royal Society of Chemistry, and its services are offered free of charge. Search hits include both free information and pointers into commercial databases that may require a subscription for access. Prior to the acquisition by RSC, ChemSpider was controlled by a private corporation, ChemZoo Inc.

Services

A number of services are made available online. These include the conversion of chemical names to chemical structures, the generation of SMILES and InChI strings as well as the prediction of many physicochemical parameters and integration to a web service allowing NMR prediction. The organization is working with RSC to develop a hash table resolver for InChIKeys, shorter hashed forms of InChIs.

See also

References

  1. ^ "RSC acquires ChemSpider". Royal Society of Chemistry. 11 May 2009. http://www.rsc.org/AboutUs/News/PressReleases/2009/ChemSpider.asp. Retrieved 2009-05-11. 
  2. ^ Welcome ChemMantis to ChemZoo and a Call for Contributions from the Community,2008-10-23, A. Williams,blog post

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message