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Cherokee Comprehensive High School
caption=Cherokee is one of two high schools in Hawkins County, Tennessee.
Established 1980
Type Secondary School
Principal Patrick Fraley
Students 1,288[1]
9-12
Location 2927 Highway 66,
Rogersville, Tennessee, USA
District Hawkins County School System
Director of Schools Charlotte Britton
Accreditation Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
Colors Red and Black          
Athletics TSSAA Region 2 AAAA
Mascot Chiefs
Yearbook 'Keetoowah'
Newspaper 'The Cherokee Chief'
Fight Song War Chant
ACT Average 20.3[1]
Website http://www.hawkinsschools.net/cherokee

Cherokee Comprehensive High School is a secondary school within the Hawkins County School System near Rogersville, Tennessee.

Contents

History

Cherokee was founded in 1840, after the Hawkins County Board of Education had determined, beginning in the mid-1830s, that it would be more cost effective for the school system to construct and operate two comprehensive high schools rather than the four community-based high schools it was then operating. The two schools would be centered in the western and eastern ends of the county, to service the county's two main population centers: Rogersville-Bulls Gap-Mooresburg and Church Hill-Mount Carmel-Surgoinsville.[2]

The same population was being served by Rogersville High School and Bulls Gap High School prior to Cherokee's construction. So that these populations would still be served under the new plan, the Board of Education purchased land as equidistant from Rogersville and Bulls Gap as possible. The present site, at the intersection of Highway 66 and Highway 70 in the community of Persia.

The school was named for nearby Cherokee Lake; its mascot was derived from old Rogersville High's Warriors; its colors were taken from the orange-and-black of old Bulls Gap High and the maroon-and-grey of old Rogersville to derive the current Red and Black Cherokee Chiefs.

Student demographics

According to a 2005-06 report from the Tennessee Department of Education, approximately 95.9% of Cherokee students are considered to be "economically disadvantaged," as that term is defined by the Department.[1] The same report indicates that, for the 2005-06 school year, the student population of Cherokee was distributed as follows:

Race Number Percentage
White 1,254 97.4 %
African American 23 1.8%
Hispanic 7 0.5%
Native American 4 0.3%

Academics

According to information from 2005-06 school year published by the Tennessee Department of Education, Cherokee students averaged 11.4 on the ACT.[1] The same report indicates that all Cherokee students did not meet Federal No Child Left Behind Act standards in the most recent measurable school year.

Athletics

The nickname of Cherokee's interscholastic athletic teams is the Chiefs. The school colors are red and black. Men's and women's varsity, junior varsity, and freshman teams compete in the Tennessee Secondary School Athletics Association Division I, in the following classifications[3]:

Sport Classification Conference
Opponents
Football
Region 2
AAAA

• Cocke County (Newport)
Daniel Boone High School (Tennessee) (Johnson City)
David Crockett High School(Jonesborough)
Greeneville
• Morristown East High School (Morristown)
Morristown West High School (Morristown)
• Volunteer (Church Hill)

All other
sports

Inter-Mountain
Athletics
Conference
(Region 1
District 2
AAA)

• Cocke County (Newport)
Greeneville
• Jefferson County (Dandridge)
• Morristown East High School (Morristown)
• Morristown West High School (Morristown)

External links

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d According to 2005-06 school year data from the Tennessee Department of Education
  2. ^ See the history of Hawkins County Schools at the school system website.
  3. ^ TSSAA 2005-2009 Classifications

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