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Chola incident
India Sikkim locator map.svg
The 1967 Sino-Indian skirmish occurred between the two Asian giants, China and India.
Date October 1 ‚ÄĒ October 2, 1967
Location Chola, Sikkim
Result PLA invasion repelled. Bilateral ceasefire.
Belligerents
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China Flag of India.svg India
Commanders
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Unknown Flag of India.svg K.B. Joshi
Casualties and losses
1 killed 9 wounded [1] 4 killed[2]

The 1967 Sino-Indian skirmish also known as the Chola incident, was a day-long battle between Indian troops and members of the Chinese People's Liberation Army in Sikkim, who had infiltrated the area. The end of the battle saw the retreatment of the People's Liberation Army from Sikkim.

Contents

Location

The skirmish occurred in Sikkim, which later became a state of India in 1975. India was responsible for the defense of Sikkim which was a protectorate at that time. The region is one of high altitudes and thus mountainous maneuvers were crucial in battle. Early Chinese positions in regions of higher altitudes would thus have provided them with an advantage. To reclaim high ground would generally require a higher ratio of a attackers to defenders.

Background

China has claimed that the McMahon Line created by Britain in NEFA was illegal. Thus they claimed the territory of Sikkim as part of South Tibet, a part of China. [3] China eventually recognized Sikkim as an Indian state in 2003, on the condition that India accepted Tibet Autonomous Region as a part of China.[4] This mutual agreement led to a thaw in Sino-Indian relations. [5] New Delhi accepted Tibet as a part of China in 1953 during the government of then Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru. [6] While Chinese casualties are 1 killed 9 wounded, Indian casualties are 4 killed in action: Joginder Pal Singh and B.K. Deka of the Regiment of Artillery, Satheesh Kumar M. of the Madras Regiment, and Krishna Bahadur Chhetri of the Assam Regiment.

See also

References

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