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Chorioamnionitis: Wikis

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Chorioamnionitis
Classification and external resources

Micrograph showing chorioamnionitis. H&E stain.
ICD-10 O41.1, P02.7
ICD-9 658.4, 762.7
eMedicine ped/89
MeSH D002821

Chorioamnionitis is an inflammation of the fetal membranes (amnion and chorion) due to a bacterial infection. It typically results from bacteria ascending into the uterus from the vagina and is most often associated with prolonged labour.

Contents

Background

The fetal membranes consist of two parts:

  • The outer membrane is the chorion. It is closest to the mother and physically supports the much thinner amnion.
  • The inner membrane is the amnion. It is in direct contact with the amniotic fluid, which surrounds the fetus.

Diagnosis

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Clinical

Chorioamnionitis is diagnosed clinically in the setting of:[1]

Exclusions:

Pathologic

Moderate chorioamnionitis (micrograph) with involvement of the subamniotic tissue. H&E stain.

Chorioamnionitis can be diagnosed from a histologic examination of the fetal membranes.

Infiltration of the chorionic plate by neutrophils is diagnostic of (mild) chorioamnionitis. More severe chorioamnionitis involves subamniotic tissue and may have fetal membrane necrosis and/or abscess formation.

Severe chorioamnionitis may be accompanied by vasculitis of the umbilical vessels (due to the fetus' inflammatory cells) and, if very severe, funisitis (inflammation of the umbilical cord's connective tissue).

Treatment

Treatment consists of:

  • antibiotics (amoxycillin + gentamicin + metronidazole) for the mother, and
  • quickly delivering the baby.

Associations

Chorioamnionitis is a risk factor for periventricular leukomalacia and cerebral palsy.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Elmar Peter Sakala, MD, MA, MPH, FACOG. Professor of GYNOB, Loma Linda University of medicine, California. Codirector of Student Clerkship. Dept of GYNOB
  2. ^ Wu YW, Colford JM (2000). "Chorioamnionitis as a risk factor for cerebral palsy: A meta-analysis". JAMA 284 (11): 1417–24. doi:10.1001/jama.284.11.1417. PMID 10989405.  

External links


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