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Christian Social Union of Bavaria
Christlich-Soziale Union in Bayern
Leader Horst Seehofer
Founded 1945
Headquarters Franz-Josef-Strauß-Haus
Nymphenburger Str. 64
80335 München
Ideology Bavarian regionalism,[1]
Christian democracy,[1]
Conservatism[1]
International affiliation International Democrat Union
European affiliation European People's Party
European Parliament Group European People's Party
Official colours Blue (campaign colour)
Website
http://www.csu.de/
Politics of Germany
Political parties
Elections

The Christian Social Union in Bavaria (About this sound CSUChristlich-Soziale Union in Bayern ) is a Christian democratic and conservative political party in Germany. It was founded as a continuation of the Weimar-era Catholic Bavarian People's Party. It operates only in the state of Bavaria, while its sister party, the Christian Democratic Union (CDU), operates in the other 15 states of Germany. The difference between the CDU and the CSU is mainly that the CSU is more conservative in domestic issues but more progressive in social issues. At the federal level, it forms a common faction in the Bundestag, the federal parliament, with the CDU. This makes up the CDU/CSU faction, which is frequently referred to as die Unionsfraktion (the Union faction). The CSU currently governs at the federal level with the CDU and FDP. In the state of Bavaria, the CSU governs in a coalition with the FDP. Even after the 2009 general election, the CDU/CSU emerged as the largest party in Germany, yet both lost votes predominantly to the FDP. The CSU received only 42.5% of the vote in Bavaria in the 2009 election, which constitutes its weakest showing in the party's history.

Franz Josef Strauß (1915–1988) had left behind the strongest legacy as a leader of the party, having led the party from 1961 until his death in 1988. His political career in the federal cabinet was unique in that he had served four ministerial posts in the years between 1953 and 1969. From 1978 until his death in 1988 he served as the minister-president of Bavaria. He was the first leader of the CSU to be a candidate for the German chancellery, in 1980. In the 1980 elections he ran against the incumbent Helmut Schmidt of the SPD, but lost thereafter, as the SPD and the FDP managed to secure an absolute majority in a social-liberal coalition.

The CSU has led the Bavarian state government since it came into existence in 1946, save from 1950 to 1953 when the Bavaria Party formed a state government in coalition with the German Branches of the SPD and the FDP. The CSU currently governs with the FDP. Before the 2008 elections in Bavaria, the CSU perennially achieved absolute majorities at the state level. This level of dominance is unique among Germany's 16 states. Edmund Stoiber took over the CSU leadership in 1999. He ran for Federal Chancellor in 2002, but his preferred CDU/CSU and FDP coalition lost against the SPD candidate Gerhard Schröders Red-Green coalition. In 2003, the CSU was re-elected as the Bavarian government with a majority (60.7% and 124 of 180 seats in the state parliament). On January 18, 2007, Stoiber announced his decision to step down from the posts of minister-president and CSU chairman by September 30 of that year.

On September 28, 2008, the CSU failed to gain an absolute majority, attaining 43%, of the vote in the Bavaria state election for the first time since 1966 on a percentage basis and was forced into a coalition with the FDP.

The CSU is a member of the European People's Party (EPP) and its European parliamentarians sit in the EPP Group. At the moment they have three ministers in Berlin: Baron Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg (Minister of Defence), Peter Ramsauer (Federal Minister of Transport, Building and Urban Affairs) and Ilse Aigner (Minister of Food, Agriculture and Consumer Protection).

Contents

Chairmen of the Christian Social Union, 1946–present

Chairman Franz Josef Strauß in 1976

Politicians

See: List of Bavarian Christian Social Union politicians

See also

Notes and references

http://allstates-flag.com/fotw/flags/de%7Dcsu.html
http://www.deutschland.de/link.php?lang=2&category2=190&link_id=1002

External links

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Christian Social Union of Bavaria
Christlich-Soziale Union in Bayern
Leader Horst Seehofer
Founded 1945
Headquarters Franz-Josef-Strauß-Haus
Nymphenburger Str. 64
80335 München
Ideology Bavarian regionalism,[1]
Christian democracy,[1]
Conservatism[1]
Political position Centre-right
International affiliation Christian Democrat International, International Democrat Union
European affiliation European People's Party
European Parliament Group European People's Party
Official colours Blue (campaign colour)
Website
http://www.csu.de/
Politics of Germany
Political parties
Elections

The Christian Social Union in Bavaria ( CSUChristlich-Soziale Union in Bayern ) is a Christian democratic and conservative political party in Germany. It was founded as a continuation of the Weimar-era Catholic Bavarian People's Party. It operates only in the state of Bavaria, while its sister party, the Christian Democratic Union (CDU), operates in the other 15 states of Germany. At the federal level, it forms a common faction in the Bundestag, the federal parliament, with the CDU. This makes up the CDU/CSU faction, which is frequently referred to as die Unionsfraktion (the Union faction). The CSU currently governs at the federal level with the CDU and FDP. In the state of Bavaria, the CSU governs in a coalition with the FDP. Even after the 2009 general election, the CDU/CSU emerged as the largest party in Germany, yet both lost votes predominantly to the FDP. The CSU received only 42.5% of the vote in Bavaria in the 2009 election, which constitutes its weakest showing in the party's history.

Franz Josef Strauss (1915–1988) had left behind the strongest legacy as a leader of the party, having led the party from 1961 until his death in 1988. His political career in the federal cabinet was unique in that he had served four ministerial posts in the years between 1953 and 1969. From 1978 until his death in 1988 he served as the minister-president of Bavaria. He was the first leader of the CSU to be a candidate for the German chancellery, in 1980. In the 1980 elections he ran against the incumbent Helmut Schmidt of the SPD, but lost thereafter, as the SPD and the FDP managed to secure an absolute majority in a social-liberal coalition.

The CSU has led the Bavarian state government since it came into existence in 1946, save from 1950 to 1953 when the Bavaria Party formed a state government in coalition with the German Branches of the SPD and the FDP. The CSU currently governs with the FDP. Before the 2008 elections in Bavaria, the CSU perennially achieved absolute majorities at the state level. This level of dominance is unique among Germany's 16 states. Edmund Stoiber took over the CSU leadership in 1999. He ran for Federal Chancellor in 2002, but his preferred CDU/CSU and FDP coalition lost against the SPD candidate Gerhard Schröders Red-Green coalition. In 2003, the CSU was re-elected as the Bavarian government with a majority (60.7% and 124 of 180 seats in the state parliament). On January 18, 2007, Stoiber announced his decision to step down from the posts of minister-president and CSU chairman by September 30 of that year.

On September 28, 2008, the CSU failed to gain an absolute majority, attaining 43%, of the vote in the Bavaria state election for the first time since 1966 on a percentage basis and was forced into a coalition with the FDP.

The CSU is a member of the European People's Party (EPP) and its European parliamentarians sit in the EPP Group. At the moment they have three ministers in Berlin: Baron Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg (Minister of Defence), Peter Ramsauer (Federal Minister of Transport, Building and Urban Affairs) and Ilse Aigner (Minister of Food, Agriculture and Consumer Protection).

Contents

Chairmen of the Christian Social Union, 1946–present

Politicians

See: List of Bavarian Christian Social Union politicians

See also

Notes and references

http://allstates-flag.com/fotw/flags/de%7Dcsu.html
http://www.deutschland.de/link.php?lang=2&category2=190&link_id=1002

External links


Simple English

Christlich-Soziale Union in Bayern
Leader Erwin Huber
Founded 1945
Headquarters Franz Josef Strauß-Haus
Nymphenburger Str. 64
80335 München
Political Ideology Christian Democracy
International Affiliation Christian Democrat International and International Democrat Union
European Affiliation European People's Party
European Parliament Group European People's Party - European Democrats
Colours Blue (campaign colour)
Website http://www.csu.de
See also Politics of Germany

Political parties
Elections

The Christian Social Union of Bavaria or Christlich Soziale Union (short CSU) is a conservative political party in the German state of Bavaria. In the federal parliament of Germany (Bundestag) the CSU and the CDU always join together.

Its chief is Erwin Huber.

History

In 1945, two local CSU groups were founded. One in Würzburg and the other in Munich.

In January 1946 the CSU was founded for the whole of Bavaria.

All state elections of Bavaria were won by the CSU. Sometimes the CSU had to make some coalitions with the Bayernpartei (Bavarian Party), the FDP or the SPD.

In the federal government the CSU always joins with the CDU.

One very famous leader of the CSU was Franz Josef Strauß. Sometimes he was well known for the good that he did. Other times because of scandals.

Programme

The CSU is a very conservative party according to the people of Bavaria, who mainly live in the countryside and smaller towns and villages.

Traditionally it tried to make a compromise between conservative tradition and social welfare.

Currently it leans to more free market beliefs instead of social care.


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